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33

Arrows have been an indicator of direction for so long that it's hard to say for sure, but my guess would be that an arrow fired from a bow only has one direction it can go, lending ease of communication when direction is needed. And since bow & arrows have been around long enough, and in practically every culture it has basically become universal. ...


29

Is the arrow symbol truly universal? The United States launched two spacecraft in 1972 and 1973 with a message for any alien species that might encounter them. The message was specifically designed to be universally interpretable. It built up it's own number system from scratch using the fundamental properties of the Hydrogen atom. The goal was to ...


25

Just to offer an alternative hypothesis, the fact that the basic shape is two lines converging on a single point, might have something to do with perspective: In this case the sense of direction is created by our very own direction. There may not have been very many highways in paleolithic Africa, but the plains may well have had some similar features. At ...


13

Think of travelling to a new place and being lost, and being frustrated and worried because you don't know how to go where you need to go. Imagine your car, dishwasher or stove is causing you problems (or any device which you care nothing about - only having it work) and then you will start having a feel about what most computer users think about computers ...


13

UXD is Bad UI Detection User Experience Design itself, when effectively practiced, could be described as a methodology for "detecting bad UI" (when the concept of UI is applicable). A fundamental reason to practice user-centricity in the form of empathetic problem solving, and use an iterative continuous-validation design process, is to detect those ...


7

No, it's not always necessary. System-defined screens are not obligatory, and there is no need to reproduce clone pages/elements with minor changes. Alternatives to hi-fi prototypes are lo-fi wireframes, user journey maps, PRDs. Yes, paper sketches/prototypes are legitimate prototypes if they are detailed enough and capture/highlight on all important parts. ...


6

The best way to detect usability issues with your application is observing people actually using it. However, even without user testing a lot of design errors can be found with Heuristics evaluation. The most used design heristics are probably those developed by Jakob Nielsen. The ten Nielsen heuristics Visibility of system status Match between system ...


6

Normal markers can be as is, but cluster markers can be distinguished by having group of overlapping makers, as show in the snap below:- This is similar to having user icon, and user group icon. Zoomed in view


5

I think the Arrow symbol is pretty universal, even without spears or perspective. Easy task: Specify a certain point / direction with colour on a wall. If you just paint a Dot it is hardly visible. A line may provide direction, but is ambiguous as it points in two directions. The best way to explicitly point to one direction/think is having multiple lines, ...


4

The Settings should be in the header. Look at the Google Material design structure as a reference. A 3-dot menu doesn't take up too much space.


4

Main problem with the sliders is that ordering is important: you cannot easily move €30 from Channel 2 to Channel 5. I see the following operations as relevant: increasing one channel's budget by decreasing the budget of one other channel increasing (decreasing) one channel's budget by proportionally taking (adding) bits from (to) other channels In ...


4

This original solution is attractive, but I agree with your assessment that it is not scalable. I would also argue that it is somewhat counter-intuitive because of its horizontal but proportional nature. For starters, I would change this interaction pattern to a set of linked fader controls. Something like what's found here for adjusting Bass & Treble: ...


4

It could have also been done because the other two options are preferred. For the example you gave, perhaps paying with a credit card or paypal only took 2% off the top of the payment while paying through Amazon might have taken 5% or more. It would be beneficial to the site owner (but not the user) if the user went through the trouble of making a new ...


4

Basically, mousestop would be used the same way as mouseover, but with one major difference. It only triggers if the mouse stops over the element. Or to say it more usefully it does not trigger useless events when the cursor enters the element accidentally because the user is just moving the cursor over the element or scrolling the page under the cursor. The ...


3

Print out the screen on plain white paper using a color printer. Put the paper in an opaque folder. Walk out to the desk of the lowest tech person in the office. Ask them to look at something for you. Open the folder, facing them... count to five... close the folder. Then, with all your colleagues within earshot, have the lowest tech person in your ...


3

Version 2 looks to me more like a grid selection to me. But I am not your user (most of the UX community here probably is not either). I am also well aware of select/deselect and grid/list views because I design this sort of thing all the time. Your users may not. So let's dig deeper... Don't mix metaphors Showing something is selected with an active ...


3

I'm assuming that you want to rate a professional's competency in a skill against the spectrum of possible competency in that skill. If that is the case, you may want to define specific levels (naïve, beginner, intermediate, advanced, master, guru, rock-star) with implied communally-held definitions. The skill name can then be followed by the ascribed ...


3

You should take a look at how linkedIn does this. Their competency ratings come from other users, and they make that transparent by showing who those "99+" endorsements came from. This makes the competency feel more real and believable. I'm not sure where your ratings will come from, but having a visual that's directly connected to the data is pretty ...


3

Does using color help? Try using matching colors on the nodes of the flow chart and the connectors like so...


2

The more cruft you can cut, the more efficient you can be in conveying your message.


2

What a great question, Niklas. I'm a huge fan of minimalism so I took a chance to write an elaborate answer. First, I beg to differ: the art movement and the design style are not the same thing. “Minimalism” as an eponymous art movement has formed in 60s, after the WWII, taking it’s roots in various precessing art movements such as Constructivism, ...


2

Advantages - Minimalist Web Designs Have Faster Download Speeds Easy Maintenance People Do Not Like Pop-Ups Helps the Focus on Content Convert Better White Space Helps Your Website “Breathe” Easier Navigation Fewer Server Resources Less Maintenance Easier Responsive Web Design


2

This is a standard verification scenario, the most common example of which is domain verification. i.e. when setting up Google Analytics a user must paste a meta tag in the homepage on the site to prove they have access. The key is to require a verification or confirmation step on Site A, and to make sure it's obvious from the interaction design that the ...


2

See this picture, a great example how Humble Bundle solves your problem: You see the three main sliders: Developers, Charity and Humble Tip. You can see, how they find a solution for the "Charity" slider, which is divided into two others sliders which can be changed without moving the other sliders - subsliders.


2

I think this will not work well for the same reason that dynamic menus failed. The user uses location cues to select items quickly. The user may use the absolute location of the item, or relative to another item (e.g. LemonChiffon is below LawnGreen). Removing the item from the list when selected, will disrupt the formation of the above cues and it will ...


2

Absolutely. To be able to do that, you need to recalibrate your brain slightly to know users' model of mind. It may sound scary but it isn't. Think of it as running a virtual machine with some OS that you don't typically use. Just the machine you are going to run is going to be a generic user, a Layman. This model of mind will be entirely different from ...


2

This may not be an answer to the specific question you are asking ("Any specific site, application or book...?"), but perhaps it can help... A drag-n-drop, graphical interface for Set-Manipulation should have a strong mapping of screen-geography to some aspect of the data being represented. When viewing a selection of Sets, the arrangement of those Sets on ...


2

Well in short - and I'm sure your team has come to this conclusion already - users won't be able to run all of these in one fell swoop. The closest you could get would be to mimic Excel-like functionality whereby users can add cell-level functions to manipulate the values. My gut reaction/solution: Grids. 3,000-5,000 records is a trivial amount. Minuscule ...


2

The requirements sound like a good fit for a spreadsheet-like application to me: the primary focus should be on the data - display as much info as possible about the records (5000 is not that many data, but you could use infinite scroll techniques) autofilter-like search on the data, saved searches and tick-box selection would provide the best way to ...


2

The very fundamentals in creating good user interfaces is to be able to view them from other user's perspectives - not from your own. If you are a user of the software it can be a good thing, but don't expect others to see the product as you do. This is the basics of why programs designed by the programmers often ends up hard to use for "regular customers" ...



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