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1

There's also another study, also done by Nielsen about navigation menus which touches the idea of categories as well. For example, if there are a lot of categories, you may choose to group them in bigger groups to help with quick scanning. You can also choose to put at the top the most used or popular if you have any data to support you in this. Or place ...


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There are some questions you can ask yourself to help you make this decision: How many categories are their going to be? 3? 6? A list is probably efficient. 9? 12? 15? A grid would reduce scrolling. Can you accurately convey meaning with just icons? Even on a smaller screen Android device? If not, you're going to be in trouble with a grid. How often will ...


2

The boys in the back garden Here's a story to illustrates the problem with tables and pagination: "Good morning Mr. Smith! Here, per your request, 20 of the town's finest - 10 young men and 10 young women". "It is ever so kind of you Gordon. Now I'd like to start by having a look at the girls, please send the boys somewhere". "Very well Sir. BOYS! chop, ...


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Grid views can indeed allow for bigger thumbnails - although not necessarily, as the height of a row on a list view could be the same height as a cell in a grid view. The main differences, IMHO, are: Grid view offers a greater number of thumbnails to the user, at any one time, than list view given the same screen real estate. This is because a list view ...


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I admit the user is very likely to go back to the first page - but is that a reasonable expectation that they should do themselves? It might feel jumpy. I don't like when interfaces do things without my command.


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Survival The need of animals to visually recognise things in their environment for what they are, and in the case of humans - face recognition, are key survival skills. This cognitive ability has evolved in humans well before language was invented, let alone written one. As such, the brain ability to recognise imagery is quicker than its ability to ...


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I don't have any beautiful research at hand, but I can explain why just images probably isn't going to be an option: A lot of users have vague and/or generic profile pictures. If everybody would upload beautiful profile pictures like in the Brewster screenshot then it would definitely be a great idea to just show a grid of images. Now, it could be that the ...


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My gut reaction would be images rather than text. The human mind operates by pattern matching which is why its often easy to recognised someone instantly - but sometimes harder to recall their name. Text has to be 'processed' by the mind so its a slower process. This is vaguely related to the findings on "recall versus recognition'. Here's a UX related ...


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What i tend to do in some cases where i have too much data to show than the table can hold, is only show the most important data in a row that is expandable like an accordion. The other data is only shown when the user clicks on that row to expand it, a bit like this. A good article on this is: ...


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Don’t combine multiple data fields in one grid column. Additionally to the sorting/ filtering problems you mention, the data will not be aligned. Non-aligned data are difficult to scan. In your example, if the ID has variable length, the starting position of the name will vary. This will make vertical reading of names difficult for users. Alternative ...


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Case 1:- Grid with few rows (<10) Show radio buttons always instead of combo(repetition is not a big deal with few rows). Case 2:- Grid with several rows (>10) Show radio buttons on mouseover only(to avoid repetition), otherwise by default show selected action in that column. Combo is not a good choice for following reasons:- Need to click ...


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If the number of selection options (Yes, No & Undecided) are the only ones or to the max if the options increase to 5 the following approach is feasible. Herein you want such a control in a grid and that too for every row wherein numerous other controls and values will be displayed. In such a scenario using a "Drop-down" for the same will be an ideal ...


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This is the most logical name for your data layout for the reasons above, as it displays all of the features/attributes of it. I would call that a grid-based card layout. It shows attributes of a card, in that is is a small area containing text data, in a grid-based format.


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I cannot reply as a comment (I miss reputation points to do that). Therefore I write an answer- let's see if it helps you. In my opinion the "card" name represents it in the best way- a single piece of data that should be viewed as a separate entity. In general, cards of various sorts are very popular on the web nowadays: ...


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In General - You'll have to look at the use cases you want to cover: You said it's about "sequential events to occur", which sounds like users want to advance or delay events (1). You also said sometimes large movements are required (2). Additional questions are: How many items are (typically) in the list? How many items does the user (typically) need ...


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Instead of having two buttons for each row, you may have only two buttons above the grid ("UP" and "DOWN") that will move the selected row up or down. Additionally you may add another two buttons above the grid ("FIRST", "LAST"), that will move the selected row at the beginning or the end of the list. This will reduce the need to repeatedly press the ...


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Users sometimes want to move things up, sometimes move things down; so you should offer both. Asking users to calculate an alternative way to achieve their task reduces usability. Consider the following daily task list: Tidy room. Buy a book on Amazon. Reply to John's email. A person might go: I can't be asked cleaning my room, this is the least of ...



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