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10

I think you have too quickly ruled out the most intuitive option. Humans are especially good at recognizing faces, and I think you might be surprised how well you can represent the nine different states with 32x32 smileys. For example, take a look at this group of smileys: http://gas13.ru/v3/pixelart/smilies_by_gas13.png or very simply: ...


7

Create a website for your portfolio. It is in essence the same as what you would need for a photography portfolio, so you have many templates to choose from in many content management systems (such as Wordpress, Joomla, Drupal, etc). Display it on dedicated portfolio sites. I have hired people directly off such sites based primarily on their portfolio, ...


7

It seems to me you are looking for the "wizard" ui pattern. Here is a link that has a lot more information explaining the purpose and reasoning behind the pattern: http://ui-patterns.com/patterns/Wizard To give the user feedback on where they are in the wizard either text or graphics can be used. I think this is the particular piece you are referring to. ...


6

You have had some great inputs but in my experience , they key thing which most UX recruiters and UX hiring managers look for is the process with which you have achieved with your end goal. While you can go with a number of different approaches with regards to how to showcase your content (slideshows, carousals, lightboxes) the end result is often not the ...


5

As ever, it depends, and really this question is unanswerable without knowing more. It depends on what your users want to take away from the graph. Some may be concerned about the spikes (which would otherwise be lost if data points were too widespread), where as others may interested in an overview in which case something like the following may suit better ...


5

What about simply graying out the line where the data doesn't exist / is unreliable? That way you can pick back up when you're in-range again, but there's an indication that there was a problem. EDIT: Assuming your "out of ranges" are always trackable right up to the top/bottom of the range, the end-result would look more like this: EDIT 2:For small ...


5

I think that using only color to differ between something as important as which hand you're using is not the way to go here. The problems with that is: Accessability, this would make your application impossible to use if I'm color blind (more common than you might think) Items will not be quickly and easily distinguishable, there are a lot of colors in ...


4

A simple argument of consistency should suffice in an 'ideal' scenario. If the buttons are doing the same function (linking to a page) they should look and feel similar. Using different colors also leads leads to the problem of highlighting everything. Usually, you choose a common theme for buttons and one for highlighting a 'selected' state. If you are ...


4

Nice graphics ;) Your questions is interesting and hard to answer in detail. I think your way of solving the mood states by colour is good and understandable for people, because there is a direct combination of colours and their perception in terms of feelings. I wouldn't use arrows in the circle, because this is a kind of very abstract concept. You have ...


3

Texture, or rather a change in the graininess of the texture over distance can be a strong visual cue for slope or depth. You could have a texture around the entry of the pit that originates from the surrounding graphics and as the gradient of the surface increases into the pit the texture becomes finer and darker in color. This will give the impression of ...


3

I would not use colors alone for displaying the moods, since a 2-d color scale would be much less intuitive than a standard 1-d scale. Also, you have to keep in mind that colors can have different meanings in different countries and cultures. See: http://webdesign.about.com/od/colorcharts/l/bl_colorculture.htm Our congnition is very capable of ...


2

Really interesting example. The main problem here is colour is overloaded - you're already using 7 different colours, so you can't possible use colour to communicate something else as well. The obvious thing is to use something "left-shaped" to communicate the left hand and so on. Perhaps use a gradient shading to the left for the left, and vice versa? It ...


2

I would suggest approaching it from a visual design perspective rather than a usability perspective. I only suggest that because the usability conversation has not worked for you. Going beyond the usability problems of highlighting a selected menu item, you could argue that multi-coloured navigation will make the color contrast of the design suffer. If there ...


2

You could use colour, size and displacement of a circle from a mid line. For example in the following image, I have converted the size of your arrows to the size of the circle, and the direction of the arrow to a displacement above or below the midline - as well as connecting the circle to the midline by a thin line so that it's clear which line it relates ...


2

Since each color can be described with three variables: hue, saturation and brightness, you could try to use a pair of these to code your X/Y. A good starting point would be to use hues (green/red) for horizontal dimension (pleasant/unpleasant) and use brightness or saturation for the vertical dimension: high = bright/saturated, low = dark/unsaturated.


1

What's worked for me over the years is showing my work. Toss up your initial concept sketches, then the wires, visual design then the completed. You know UX is a bunch of other skill-sets mashed together to come up with something that works. Show the person looking at your work that you can think through the processes, how you got there and then what was ...


1

This is something I've been thinking about recently as I don't currently showcase any of my UX work, only front-end web development which is much easier to deal with. The problem I've encountered is that all my UX stuff is part of a process, and not really part of the public-facing finished product, so clients have generally been very unwilling to give me ...


1

Stick with the bordered circle. The fill color being the color of the quadrant, while the border being a color corresponding to the closest axis ray. The closer to an axis the thicker the border. If nearly equally close to the center, or neutral, then, perhaps a solid neutral color; yet I hesitate to suggest white, grey, or black; perhaps a brown.


1

I agree with ChrisF. I recently downloaded a game from my iPad entitled "Falling Fred". The whole game revolves around you dodging obstacles as you fall to your death. Here's how they treat the perspective and the hints at distance. http://static.apptrackr.org/itunes/3/414729389-1303528620/screenshot0_1303528621_a43582a4c8404462fded2d874a325ca9.jpg


1

For numeric values consider bar charts and line charts. The canonical way of representing stock prices over time is a line chart, for example; people understand how to read that. Consider the following example from http://www.uswx.com. This chart shows aligned regions conveying a bunch of numeric weather data over time: You could align check boxes ...


1

I like the classic grid layout that many early games used and is still used today in agrybirds. There is a linier grid of levels and when you select the level it opens a grid of all the levels in that group. Here is the angry birds example from chrome: (and please no making fun of my star ratings, this was my first experience with angry birds) Its very ...



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