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53

broken? "If not even the spelling is correct, how can I trust this works correctly?" This is especially troublesome for web sites that want to hold private data. I might not even want to give you my e-mail. dead? When obvious errors remain online for a long time, this suggests that you don't care to fix them (lack of respect) you are technically ...


49

Yes. The Oxford Comma increases readability. When items are logically separate, putting a delimiter between them makes their separation visually obvious. Without the delimiter, the separation can still be determined, but it is not obvious. The Oxford comma removes the requirement that the reader figure out whether item n and item n-1 are logically ...


40

If it's clear, say it in the least number of words possible. If there is no confusion, then there is no problem. "Import image" - clear. "Create app" - clear. "Add description" - clear. For further reading, I suggest the Android Writing Style.


37

The book On Writing Well (a great book,) suggests making things like these plural. In the book, he talks about how to avoid the gender problem when talking about men/women. (By calling them people.) For example, when talking about a specific user, instead of saying "when he clicks on the button..." you'd say "when they click on the button...", or the passive ...


28

"Login" is a noun or adjective. "Log in" is a verb. Go to the login page. - adjective Go to your login. - noun Log in to twitter. - verb


26

In English, both in computers and under the blue ceiling, title-style capitalization (capitalizing first letters of nearly all words) is for titles, and sentence-style capitalization (capitalize only the first letter for the first word) is for sentences. Titles generally include headers for your documents, pages, and sections therein and labels for controls. ...


23

You could consider changing the wording of the values: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


23

I think the top-voted answer is only partially correct... The Oxford comma can resolve ambiguity OR create ambiguity, depending on context. This is the reason that grammar experts and style guides disagree on the use of the Oxford comma - sometimes the Oxford comma helps, sometimes it actually hurts readability. Consider the following examples... "I gave ...


22

Yes this will leave a bad impression. And remember, first impressions are very important. I would get this corrected as soon as possible. Not only will it make the site/company look unprofessional, but it will be difficult to understand. No offense intended, but I actually had to read this question a couple times to fully understand what you were saying ...


21

Spelling mistakes can have quite a large impact on your site's visitors. A quote from the Stanford Guidelines for Web Credibility Typographical errors and broken links hurt a site's credibility more than most people imagine. It's also important to keep your site up and running. Typos make your site look amateurish, just like broken links or unavailable ...


17

I vote A. I read the result/s initially as result per second. Result(s) seems more natural, but I would prefer the option were you'd detect if the number is larger than 1 and change result to results. Maybe take a look here: english.stackexchange here the (s) seems to be the standard. Another option is to put it like this: Matching results: 1 With ...


15

I think the key is in how it sounds when read aloud. When people read a sentence they normally "hear" it as speech with their internal voice (theories on this originally based on Lev Vygotsky's work, and there are even indications that this inner speech has an accent). A comma translates to a pause in speech, so I think readability will be improved if the ...


12

Punctuation is used to reveal the structure of written text. A period separates sentences in a paragraph. All style guides call for no punctuation in captions, titles, and headings, with the exception of question and exclamation marks. From The Oxford Guide to Style. 2002. Oxford: Oxford University Press: Do not use full point in headlines, column ...


11

Keep it simple: Send to: User Admin Manager It is quite common in English to skip articles at all in titles, etc.


10

You should limit the label to some action word if possible. This also makes it easier if you want to replace the label with an icon. Add Create Import And if the context is ambiguous, add a descriptor. Image Contact Description There are cases where you might want to skip the action and directly use the descriptors. Eg: for login, many sites just ...


9

Abdul, there is one other thing to be aware of. There are many established websites with high visitor counts that contain spelling and grammatical errors - but a spelling mistake on those sites is different from a spelling mistake on other sites (such as yours). When your site is established and well-respected (like BBC News) typos are bad, but users will ...


9

Note that "I am" is also not grammatical if two people are operating the machine as a pair. Quite simply Choose destination for image: {User, Administrator, Manager} Send image to: {User, Administrator, Manager} Send image to User is not bad grammar. Rather, it is an example of the condensed dialect of English that is used in newspaper headlines and ...


8

I would keep it as a simple message along the lines of the Android writing style guidelines (even if it isn't for mobile): Download for 1 credit? Download | Cancel It's short, to the point, and avoids words with negative connotations.


8

In the olden days, the written word existed principally to allow reading out loud. The comma indicated that the reader should leave a very short pause before going on to the next word. That pause is almost imperceptible, but it affects the way the hearer understands what has been said. The Oxford comma is no exception. Without that pause the list is ...


7

Messages should be full sentences with correct capitalization, punctuation and grammar. Mistakes to avoid ... Random capitalization of Words in the Middle of sentences. Only proper nouns - names of people and places - should be capitalized. Incorrect use of apostrophe's. Use them to indicate possession (ownership) Incorekt speeling. If you're not sure, ...


7

I tend to follow these guidelines: When the sentence is in a contracted imperative form as: Choose File Select File to Upload -> the words are capitalized. When the sentence is in full form as: Please select a file to upload Browse the complete list of files -> the words aren't capitalized Mostly though, I think the choice is a design one. All lower case ...


7

If you are using English, then the most common way is option A. 100 matching result(s). However I would strongly discourage using this, as it makes it very difficult to internationalise your application. I would suggest finding a way of wording it that does not require a reference to a singular or plural noun. I would rather use: Matching results: ...


6

I'd say this perfectly acceptable. I typically do the same thing when prompting a user to select one or more items. I just use the plural of the word, rather than add a (s) at the end. The idea here is to make it easier for the user to read and understand the label. If making it more grammatically correct makes it more confusing or more cumbersome for the ...


4

Mac OS X Human Interface Guidelines: Provide direct, simple feedback that people can understand. For example, error messages should spell out exactly what situation caused the error (“There’s not enough space on that disk to save the document”) and possible actions the user can take to rectify it (“Try saving the document in another location”). ...


4

Spell Check is never something to rely upon completely. I have a client who mentioned the vast array of products in their "whorehouses". It was spelled correctly, but not exactly accurate.


4

It depends on your target audience and the voice you are using. You can be quite professional and yet use an informal voice. Check out http://balsamiq.com/ for an example (great tool, BTW). Contractions are part of informal communication. If you need to remain formal, then do not use them. Also understand that a seemingly easily missed contraction can ...


4

Grammar largely depends on the language of the viewer I have a few websites that I maintain that are read around the world. Rather than paying a company to rewrite all of the copy on the sites, we've been using the Google Translate Widget to allow visitors to convert the text from English into their own language automatically. One of the things to consider ...


3

Capitalise or don't capitalise? The answer is simple: follow your company's style guide. But I always tell my students: "Don't write your own company style guide, just use a published one from elsewhere." Here is an existing style guide for text (including capitalisation) by Microsoft. Here's why I advise my students to use an existing style guide: A ...


3

I think your question had the right answer, in a way: The program should output: Hello World Further, how are you displaying output when it is long? The most readable tutorial would maintain the formatting regardless of the length of the output example, so if it's not in "pre" tags or set apart some other away, pick a method and stick to it ...


3

Neither. In this case, we are talking about programming, and "strings". It should be specific. If we aren't putting in a "." then we shouldn't say we are going to see one, even if it's grammatically correct. When learning how to program, it is incredibly import to convey how sensitive the syntax is. Evey period (.) comma (,) semicolon (;) etc must be used ...



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