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12

Pragmatically it's when the cost of doing the graceful degradation outweighs the benefit. So in your case, you really need to know the number of users who have JavaScript turned off. If this is a large proportion of your user base, then you probably have to do something to cater for them. If it's only a small percentage, then you probably don't need to ...


6

There's no answer that applies universally. I will say that accommodating non-JS is becoming much less of a priority. From an accessibility standpoint, things like ARIA are helping us move in the right direction allowing JavaScript to be an assumed standard tool. I usually draw the line at sanity. At a certain point, the amount of time/effort spent on an ...


6

I think you can add a button after the 'country select input', then reload the incomplete form with the selected country territories. When Javascript is enabled, hide the button. If it's worth worrying about users with Javascript disabled, I think it depends on the kind of thing you're doing, the target, and the time you have to do it. In this case, seems ...


2

Why don't you use compatibility check library like Modernizr http://www.modernizr.com/ Than based on your detection, decide what you load, so that newer browsers get the HTML5 goodies and all the rest get to work with jQuery UI.


2

I think of something like this: Which is inspired by pie (curcular or radial) menu.


1

FavBrowser as very good ones for the specific case of Internet Explorer 6: Why People are Still Using Internet Explorer 6? You Seem to Be Using IE6 Internet Explorer 6 Motivation How To Deal With People That Use Internet Explorer 6 Internet Explorer 6 CSS Mess


1

I personally don't like the idea of graceful degradation, especially now that almost every new Windows PC from an OEM ships with Chrome preinstalled and Mac's should mostly have some sort of version of Safari that supports most HTML5 features. One approach is that the app is either fully supported or it doesn't work and the user is pointed to a free web ...


1

Unfortunately, the only option is a form submit after the selection. I would recommend a combo-box with a handy "submit" button nearby. Then the next page would load with a new list based on the user's previous selection. Keep the lists short though. If you need to present a lot of options you may want to consider radio buttons or checkboxes. I am unsure ...


1

It depends! If your entire loading time of the page within the process stays within a second, I would recommend to implement similar controls of the web page. Your image of Firefox implementing the range input is really bad, and if it can be avoided it should. Jacob Nielsen, a usability guru, wrote an article of Response time limits on applications and web ...



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