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36

The following screenshot is taken from the speech by Jon Wiley at UXweek 2011 (Original video). He explains the design decisions made by google in the past months. Look towards the end (after minute 27) of the video to see it by yourself: red is for "create something" green is for "share something" blue is for "do something" (e.g. submit a form) Keep ...


34

They arrange the items depending on what you search for. I.E. searching for 'Tax' is likely to return many News results, so that is shown alongside 'web': Searching for 'Mexico Flag' is likely to return lots of images, so they set 'Images' as the next tab: Whereas searching for 'Bristol' (A city in England) returns 'maps' as the next tab: ...


33

Sometimes things exist not because they still make sense, but because their presence is an affordance -- i.e. it works not because it's good, but because the visitor understands what it is, what it does, and how to use it, because they've been inculcated over years with this knowledge. The "I'm Feeling Lucky" button is a grand example of this, because as ...


29

drag'n'drop nearly always has bad affordance. The current model in gmail is the following: Albeit I'm not sure if they're really serious about it, esp. as it only appears to the hovered element. The previous one was this: More dragg-ish, but still bad. I think in order to reach good affordance with a drag-n-drop control, it either has to be ...


18

Interestingly, the button costs google up to $110 million per year. In 2007, Google search boss Marissa Mayer estimated that 1% of all Google searches go through the I'm Feeling Lucky button – skipping Google's search results pages entirely. That meant that Google showed ZERO ads (and therefore got ZERO ad clicks) on 1% of all Google search queries. ...


18

Neither approach is ideal. You almost need a combination of the two. If I select that I want something to happen every single month, just because it's on the 31st doesn't mean that I don't want it to reoccur. I would stop trusting my calendar forever if even once it failed to notify me. Better to assume people want it reoccurring than to just be OCD. Those ...


16

Three bar icons are now being used widely to indicate a "show list/menu" function - it's not just Chrome. Below are screenshots from Day One and PlaceMe (I only had to open a couple of apps to find examples of this usage). I believe the icon was a poor choice by Apple (in hindsight) - it does not give a clear interaction cue, it's more of a reorderable ...


13

Google actually removes autosuggestions for specific searches. In which cases? Searchengineland writes: Were things being removed? Yes, and for these specific reasons, Google says: Hate or violence related suggestions Personally identifiable information in suggestions Porn & adult-content related suggestions Legally mandated ...


12

I don't work for Google, so my answer will just be a guess at best. Let's look at this button in basic terms: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups It's necessary to make clear that the state is active. Google does this by changing the colour. With this type of button, you would expect that clicking again would ...


12

There are two psychological key aspects that are in play when it comes to this matter. Users want to feel as they are in control Users (people) want the ability to choose The I'm feeling lucky feature does not cater to either of these aspects. It is true that the user and the SEO will agree on the most suiting search result on a majority of the time. ...


12

The way outlook handles it is closer to what I would imagine a persons intentions would be when scheduling an appointment. However Outlook doesn't give you the option to handle it differently, which is a mistake. You should be given the choice which way you would like it handled when you schedule an appointment for a day that each month doesn't have ...


11

The hand cursor icon is used for controls that provide navigation-like interaction. The regular cursor icon is retained when the interactive items are not for navigation, e.g. command/action buttons. The distinction between navigation and navigation/action can sometimes be subtle in apps like Gmail, but it is an important one and can drive user expectations ...


11

It seems to be an attempt to : reduce the need for labelling and custom filtering allow users to process their emails faster (in a broad sense) help users to focus on what they feel is important at the moment: checking regular emails, social networks chores and notifications, promotional emails, etc.


9

Yes there is. Apple OS X UX Guidelines: https://developer.apple.com/library/mac/#documentation/UserExperience/Conceptual/AppleHIGuidelines/Intro/Intro.html Apple iOS Guidelines: http://developer.apple.com/library/ios/#documentation/userexperience/conceptual/mobilehig/Introduction/Introduction.html Android UX Guidelines: ...


9

If you had 20 links, it would take you longer to scan for the attachment button than it would with two links and an expansion button. They are just optimising the most common use case. You should always optimise for very common actions over rare actions. How much more common or rare they need to be is a judgement call which should be based on data and ...


8

I don't think there is any difference from a UX standpoint. But I'd say dashes are much more common and common is good. :) PHP content management systems like Drupal and WordPress prefer dashes. In the past, Matt Cutts at Google has also recommended dashes: http://www.mattcutts.com/blog/dashes-vs-underscores/ Edit: Google recommends dashes/hyphens too: ...


7

It does ever so subtly draw focus on the tab under the cursor. Windows 7 does a similar thing in the icons on the start bar except they pick the dominant colour of the icon. Here's a snip from the msdn blog: ( http://blogs.msdn.com/b/e7/archive/2008/11/20/happy-anniversary-windows-on-the-evolution-of-the-taskbar.aspx ) "Color hot-track is a small touch ...


7

Our admin [Rahul] said that his contact on the Google Chrome team had told him, "because tests indicated it was necessary". Knowing how much testing happens at Google before changes are rolled out, such a response isn't surprising. However, it's not unheard of them to reverse the decision based on negative real-world feedback. So, it might return in a ...


7

It's not completely obvious what the home page should be, both from a usability and from a branding point of view. If the logo always leads to the search engine, it might confuse users in, say, gmail (without actual data this is just speculation but Google would know it better than us from usability tests or log data). But if the logo is linked to the home ...


7

As a style, people often describe very thin lines and neutral shades of color as minimal. If you emphasize everything, nothing gets emphasized. Minimalist art is about emphasis. I suppose you could relate this to web design by saying minimalist design emphasizes content (text, video, sound). Minimalism in design sprung from WW2. There was a new emphasis on ...


7

After thinking about this question for the last couple months and reading some related literature (Stephen P. Anderson's Seductive Interaction Design in particular), I've decided that the continuing existence of the button is likely due to a combination of three factors: Branding - As @RachelKeslensky writes in her answer: keeping the button says "Yes, ...


7

Gmail is opting for pre-organizing some of the information for the user to avoid clutter. There are many emails coming from certain sources that will be read at a later date by the user but that maybe don't usually require immediate attention. Filtering or tagging helps, but a user still has to skim through their properly tagged emails from facebook, ...


7

The Google home page is simple and uncluttered. But, once you search for something - you can filter: Are we missing something - or are you?


7

These are called 'Dark patterns' and these can be used in many different ways to influence users behaviour. Social networks as you mentioned put the logout button in a separate menu, Facebook in particular hide the 'deactivate' option very deeply in a settings structure. Some people also believe that you can never delete your Facebook account, when in ...


6

I do not see how the + sign has anything to do with Google+. :) It is just a matter of balancing the importantance/"commoness" of actions. By each thing you make directly visible, everything else becomes a little less visible. Google simply pushes the simplicity factor to the edge in their visuals, like always. For example, it might be faster for some to ...


6

Bells have been used for signaling forever, really. On that premise, it's easy to go for a bell when it comes to notifications, as they are just that; signals that something is happening. A bell requires - maybe even demands - your attention, and so does a notification! As to whether it's industry standard or not, it currently doesn't pass a quick Google ...


5

Quite simply, I think it's just a way of making the user feels the app is responsive to them. The glow is a subtle 'alive' signal that keeps the application from feeling too static. This is more important than you might think. Users distrust software - they're usually suspicious an app will either not work as expected, or won't work at all (i.e. it just ...


5

The obvious issue with the 'I'm Feeling Lucky' button is that it doesn't do anything useful. (ie it doesn't provide any information that you can't get by pressing 'Return' - which is always easier than having to pick the mouse up and press on a button) If Google were to remove it one day, I'd be surprised if anyone noticed.


4

You might as well ask why websites include Print buttons when people can just print the page by selecting File > Print (or some comparable option). The point is that not every user knows these things about their web browsers, and there is an element of design involved where the immediacy/presence of the control increases the likelihood of it getting used. ...


4

Did anyone see the "Send Feedback" functionality in the bottom right corner? That is by far my favorite interaction on the site and I wish I could somehow implement it on my website. The other thing that I really like about G+ is the integration with the rest of the products and the general update of every interface that I use. The notification bar at the ...



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