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Android have the following terms for each gesture: Source: http://developer.android.com/design/patterns/gestures.html I believe these are good terms as pinch can still be used as the overall term for the type of gesture, but then if you want specifics for which direction then open or close are good terms because they specifically refer to the opening or ...


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How about a phone that just knows it is in the users hand based on bio-metrics and make this whole argument go away.


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Very interesting question. I think this pattern may probably help different kind of users to feel instantly familiar. Mentioned facebook chat icon is obviously the same icon I can see on the website. So first time I open the facebook App, I won't be confused about where the chat is hidden but I will immediately see the icon which teach me this. Next time I ...


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It depends on how you do that exactly. If you have one action at different locations of the app and the user has to use gesture 1 in location 1 but has to use gesture 2 in location 2 this is VERY bad. The user has to remember which gesture does what where. If you allow the user to use multiple gestures for one specific action and all of these gestures do ...


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Multiple user actions to get to the same effect is not necessarily bad. The chat button is the obvious way, the swipe is the fast way. An analogy on the desktop would be menu items (obvious) and keyboard shortcuts (fast). (I don't think anyone's ever suggested keyboard shortcut's are any kind of anti-pattern, but not positive.) Of course on a touch UI ...


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I think there a few very solid reasons to allow one area of content to be accessed by multiple gestures. User education and the introduction of new features being two of them. In the Facebook example you mention, I think the chat icon serves as a stepping stone. After touching the icon and witnessing the animation / location of the friends list, Facebook ...


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I've had a thought about this in the past. First, consider a highly unscientific experiment I just did on myself (it doesn't have ethics board approval). If I go to the home screen on my iPhone 5 and casually swipe upward from above the "dock" (a gesture with no assigned function), the result depends on how I'm holding the phone. If I use my thumb, ...


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The design should be made in such a way that, it can perform equally well in both the case, i.e. user interacting with forefinger and user interacting with thumb. Best way to do this is, to leave enough room surrounding any action elements, so that user would not tap on wrong buttons mistakenly. Now when user controls with forefinger, his finger can ...


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Mathematically speaking, flipping an image is the same as scaling it by a negative factor. Many drawing applications (e.g. Illustrator, SketchUp) let you flip an object in this way-- you scale the object to zero, and then keep going out the other side. The pinch gesture could be made to work this way, although it could be somewhat tricky to do with one ...



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