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42

Don't rely on shaking as the only way of selecting any common action. The exception is novelty apps like whips or throwing dice. For other apps it is poor UX as it: Is uncommon behaviour for many users, as most apps (sanely) don't use this action. Has poor discoverability as there is no cue on the screen letting you know how to use it. There may be an ...


30

Admittedly, I'm not a Kinect user, but to me this doesn't seem like a good fit for a gesture. Gestures are useful for actions that: You want to do frequently - The point of gestures is making something easy to do; and you aren't likely to remember a gesture for something you do rarely. Are easily reversible - It is easy to accidentally make a gesture, so ...


20

Why not try some variation of the following (crude) sketch, with the circle indicating a touch point and the arrow a swipe?


18

On the XBox, there is the standard Guide gesture which pauses games and opens a menu where you can e.g. quit or restart the current level. Maybe you could use such a menu to offer a log out button that the user can touch or push. Use the Kinect Guide gesture to pause game play or open the Kinect Guide. To do this, position both arms at your sides. ...


17

Maybe an approach... Show the user in page indicator under the list, there a more items available. The beneficial: the arrangement corresponds with user mental model and user sees the current page.


11

If the gesture is easier than the code, why haven't website login pages adopted this? Accessibility: How is someone supposed to draw a squiggle if they can't use the mouse? Recordability: Look at a numeric keypad (1 in the lower left corner). "183456" is easy to write down in a text editor for the memory-challenged. Furthermore, the only squiggle I ...


11

Let's assume for a moment that we're talking about a touch interface without any other controls. Direct Manipulation As noted in the comments above, there are a limited number of gestures for directly manipulating content. From gestureworks: The Tap family are all out. Rotation is possible, but unlikely to be intuitive. It's also not particularly ...


11

Have the system log you out if you walk away. The workflow becomes walking up to the camera, holding up a QR code to log in, doing your work, then walking away. Next person repeats the same steps. If there are cases where a second user enters the range of the camera while the first is still present, or the same user needs to log in under a second account, ...


9

Yes. Not because I think it's a big problem (I know other think it's bad though), but because I often pick up my phone and find it unintentionally shaken. The Google+ app brings up the bug-report form when shaken, and standard iOS behavior is to "undo". When I pick up my phone and find the messages "send bug?" or "really undo?" and I always think: "Oh, ...


9

As you have mentioned in the comments to the answer from @dan1111 logging in is as simple as holding up a QR code Could you not have a second QR code which the users hold up to log out? Alternatively you also state that spoken word input is acceptable so why try to re-invent the wheel - Just have the users state "Log me out" (I assume here that you ...


8

Apple's original unlock screen design seems as good as any:


8

The basic gestures, such as flicking, pinching, and tapping, are mentioned in user guides that are included in the box. For example, see PDF manuals for Apple iPad, HP TouchPad, and Barnes & Noble NOOK (search for "pinch" to find the section on gestures). If an application uses gestures in an unusual manner, developers provide an intro about the ...


8

I definitely wouldn't do this; the pull down to refresh mentioned in John's answer is probably the most common gesture. Though if refreshing isn't automatic or is a common action for non-power users I'd personally recommend just sticking with a button; you have a pretty universal "refresh" icon at your disposal and refresh is quite often initiated from a ...


7

There is not yet any standard, but a good place to start for any touch symbols is the Touch Gesture Reference Guide. In that the gesture would be (depending on what you mean by swipe)


7

I'm not sure usage heat maps are all that useful, as users tend to interact with the regions where the most important controls are - regardless if they are in the optimum location or not. There are some optimal thumb range heat maps in an article about thumb reachability for different sized iPhones. It might be used with tablets as well by mirroring the ...


6

Drawing a pattern with your finger is a lot easier than doing it with a mouse. It's one of the reasons electronic pen/tablet became populare with graphics designers and CAD users. On a website therefore, typing in the numbers is probably a lot easier...


6

This won't work with just thumb, but neither does pinch. Have the user put 4 fingers spread on the screen, the map then zooms in so that the polygon whose vertices are your fingers fills the whole screen. To me this seems much more intuitive than pinch zoom, especially for pictures and maps. For instance, if I have a picture with a face in it, I just put ...


6

Gestures that don't mimic real physical interaction are not easily learned. I would suggest you do not use a gesture for this but a button, icon, or text instead. Questions to ask before introducing a gesture: Am I adding value? Or is it a gimmick? Does this gesture make sense if it were manipulating the physical. How many seconds does this add to the ...


5

Firstly, try to make that gesture as simple as possible (probably requiring only one finger) and as differentiated as possible from the usual ones (used for other purposes elsewhere) such as the two-finger zoom. "Differentiated" here does not imply that the gesture needs to be absolutely different but it should ideally be a less common one so that user can ...


5

Shaking is a physical gesture. Apart from a physical gesture, there should be a primary digital counterpart too. Volume can be controlled by sliding the volume bar of clicking the volume buttons. Phone can be answered by swiping/moving the slider or clicking the handsfree button. Physical gestures can be thought of as short-cuts, it is fine if you have ...


5

Current design has some bad features: Per-column layout isn't scalable, as the screen width is limited. And horisontal swipe for scrolling could conflict with screen changing gesture interaction. Per-column interaction isn't convenient, as the data is best readed row by row. Increase and decrease buttons rather small for touch interaction. You ...


4

Gestures will get more and more important as the touchscreen technology gets popular. Imagine a popup that closes when user draws a line across it instead of clicking the ok button or the tiniest cross ever in the corner of the window. The time is coming for the point&drag interfaces to emerge ;) I'm not advocating nor promoting them. Consider it a ...


4

The principle of 'the point under the finger follows the finger' is already behind the gestures for pan, swipe, pinch and zoom. The principle suggests how to add new gestures for transforms like rotate and flip too. One index finger left to right at same time as other index finger right to left. Swaps left and right. One index finger top to bottom at ...


4

What's wrong with doing all 3 ?! I am strong fan of appealing to different kinds of intuitions when guiding people.


4

The thing about gestures is that they should have consistent behavior across all apps on a platform. Otherwise, they'll be confusing and hard to discover. As I've mentioned in my comment to the OP, HP's webOS uses sliding pane a lot (it's actually a part of the official style guide). Here're a few screenshots showing how the layout is implemented in apps ...


4

Gesture-based interfaces, such as those on smartphones and tablets, gained a lot of criticism for the disadvantages of gestures as an interaction system. One of the main points against gesture interfaces is the problem of discovery - since these gestural interactions are supposed to be "natural" and "intuitive", there is usually no affordance (hint for ...


4

The thing with Touch is despite all the talk of "gestures" there are really only a few basic gestures humanly possible: Tap Tap and hold Swipe Drag (swipe with constant physical contact) Pinch (in/out) As you'll note even these gestures you're partially repeating yourself; tap and hold is just a longer tap, swiping is just dragging but letting go ...


4

"Client explicitly asked for something connected to the world of agriculture" Perhaps you could argue the following simple metaphors: Touch to keep. To touch is akin to identifying with something, to form a bond, or to nurture or care for something. By using the word touch you are suggesting the user wants to keep the item. It's also the simplest ...


4

I believe this is what you're looking for: http://www.mobiletuxedo.com/touch-gesture-icons/


3

Which one is easier to remember I would say it depends on the kind of memory that prevails on the user: Declarative memory would prefer a numerical password, since it "consists of information that is explicitly stored and retrieved". Procedural memory would prefer a gesture, since "it is revealed when one does better in a given task due only to ...



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