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42

Don't rely on shaking as the only way of selecting any common action. The exception is novelty apps like whips or throwing dice. For other apps it is poor UX as it: Is uncommon behaviour for many users, as most apps (sanely) don't use this action. Has poor discoverability as there is no cue on the screen letting you know how to use it. There may be an ...


10

Let's assume for a moment that we're talking about a touch interface without any other controls. Direct Manipulation As noted in the comments above, there are a limited number of gestures for directly manipulating content. From gestureworks: The Tap family are all out. Rotation is possible, but unlikely to be intuitive. It's also not particularly ...


9

Yes. Not because I think it's a big problem (I know other think it's bad though), but because I often pick up my phone and find it unintentionally shaken. The Google+ app brings up the bug-report form when shaken, and standard iOS behavior is to "undo". When I pick up my phone and find the messages "send bug?" or "really undo?" and I always think: "Oh, ...


8

The basic gestures, such as flicking, pinching, and tapping, are mentioned in user guides that are included in the box. For example, see PDF manuals for Apple iPad, HP TouchPad, and Barnes & Noble NOOK (search for "pinch" to find the section on gestures). If an application uses gestures in an unusual manner, developers provide an intro about the ...


8

If the gesture is easier than the code, why haven't website login pages adopted this? Accessibility: How is someone supposed to draw a squiggle if they can't use the mouse? Recordability: Look at a numeric keypad (1 in the lower left corner). "183456" is easy to write down in a text editor for the memory-challenged. Furthermore, the only squiggle I ...


8

I definitely wouldn't do this; the pull down to refresh mentioned in John's answer is probably the most common gesture. Though if refreshing isn't automatic or is a common action for non-power users I'd personally recommend just sticking with a button; you have a pretty universal "refresh" icon at your disposal and refresh is quite often initiated from a ...


7

There is not yet any standard, but a good place to start for any touch symbols is the Touch Gesture Reference Guide. In that the gesture would be (depending on what you mean by swipe)


6

Gestures that don't mimic real physical interaction are not easily learned. I would suggest you do not use a gesture for this but a button, icon, or text instead. Questions to ask before introducing a gesture: Am I adding value? Or is it a gimmick? Does this gesture make sense if it were manipulating the physical. How many seconds does this add to the ...


5

This won't work with just thumb, but neither does pinch. Have the user put 4 fingers spread on the screen, the map then zooms in so that the polygon whose vertices are your fingers fills the whole screen. To me this seems much more intuitive than pinch zoom, especially for pictures and maps. For instance, if I have a picture with a face in it, I just put ...


5

Firstly, try to make that gesture as simple as possible (probably requiring only one finger) and as differentiated as possible from the usual ones (used for other purposes elsewhere) such as the two-finger zoom. "Differentiated" here does not imply that the gesture needs to be absolutely different but it should ideally be a less common one so that user can ...


5

Shaking is a physical gesture. Apart from a physical gesture, there should be a primary digital counterpart too. Volume can be controlled by sliding the volume bar of clicking the volume buttons. Phone can be answered by swiping/moving the slider or clicking the handsfree button. Physical gestures can be thought of as short-cuts, it is fine if you have ...


5

Current design has some bad features: Per-column layout isn't scalable, as the screen width is limited. And horisontal swipe for scrolling could conflict with screen changing gesture interaction. Per-column interaction isn't convenient, as the data is best readed row by row. Increase and decrease buttons rather small for touch interaction. You ...


4

Gesture-based interfaces, such as those on smartphones and tablets, gained a lot of criticism for the disadvantages of gestures as an interaction system. One of the main points against gesture interfaces is the problem of discovery - since these gestural interactions are supposed to be "natural" and "intuitive", there is usually no affordance (hint for ...


4

The thing with Touch is despite all the talk of "gestures" there are really only a few basic gestures humanly possible: Tap Tap and hold Swipe Drag (swipe with constant physical contact) Pinch (in/out) As you'll note even these gestures you're partially repeating yourself; tap and hold is just a longer tap, swiping is just dragging but letting go ...


4

The principle of 'the point under the finger follows the finger' is already behind the gestures for pan, swipe, pinch and zoom. The principle suggests how to add new gestures for transforms like rotate and flip too. One index finger left to right at same time as other index finger right to left. Swaps left and right. One index finger top to bottom at ...


4

Gestures will get more and more important as the touchscreen technology gets popular. Imagine a popup that closes when user draws a line across it instead of clicking the ok button or the tiniest cross ever in the corner of the window. The time is coming for the point&drag interfaces to emerge ;) I'm not advocating nor promoting them. Consider it a ...


4

The thing about gestures is that they should have consistent behavior across all apps on a platform. Otherwise, they'll be confusing and hard to discover. As I've mentioned in my comment to the OP, HP's webOS uses sliding pane a lot (it's actually a part of the official style guide). Here're a few screenshots showing how the layout is implemented in apps ...


4

"Client explicitly asked for something connected to the world of agriculture" Perhaps you could argue the following simple metaphors: Touch to keep. To touch is akin to identifying with something, to form a bond, or to nurture or care for something. By using the word touch you are suggesting the user wants to keep the item. It's also the simplest ...


3

Which one is easier to remember I would say it depends on the kind of memory that prevails on the user: Declarative memory would prefer a numerical password, since it "consists of information that is explicitly stored and retrieved". Procedural memory would prefer a gesture, since "it is revealed when one does better in a given task due only to ...


3

It is getting old (2004), but here's a research article that tries to answer this question : Guidelines for multimodal user interface design. Reeves, L. M., Lai, J., Larson, J. A., Oviatt, S., Balaji, T. S., Buisine, S., Collings, P., Cohen, P., Kraal, B., Martin, J., McTear, M., Raman, T., Stanney, K. M., Su, H., and Wang, Q. Y. 2004. Guidelines for ...


3

If it's truly an on/off or yes/no choice, then a toggle switch is generally preferred. Android, iOS and Windows 8 all have them: It should of course be clear what the "on" and "off" states mean, and by default the "active" state generally involves adding a color (and for whatever reason, moving to the right). I'd recommend sticking to default controls ...


3

Selecting, Zooming, and Panning You pretty much have the right ideas. The Windows User Experience Interaction Guidelines provide standards for this. For example, page 437 specifies: Single-left-click selects. Single-right-click opens the context menu. Double-click (left or right) selects and performs the default command. Single-shift-click (left or right) ...


2

Tailor your gestures to the platform you are using. Users are already familiar with the the gestures of the platform, so use the same in your specification. iPhone and Android both have resources for their standard gestures. And this guide might be a good place to start: http://www.lukew.com/ff/entry.asp?1071


2

Because it's a touchscreen device there might be a few other solutions instead of using icons or buttons. In the design projects I've been working on I've ben trying to envision how the content can function as the interface so the UI can be more directly engaged with, well at least as much as possible. One option would be to continue the vertical list (like ...


2

I think there are two reasons for this. Sites normally have a username and password, both of which are required and they have to be unique. If you are going to type in one, then you may as well type in both. The difference with a phone is that 10 people can have the same pattern, because what differentiates them is the phone they are using. On a ...


2

Jakob Nielsen's Alertbox had an article about first impressions of Kinect gestural UI. One could observe a few different implementations and ideologies for gestures there, varying by the application. The article is about game UIs, so it might not suit as such to your case but gives good tips, anyhow. Some thoughts about gesture UIs: Pros no need for a ...


2

If I were you Id just add a (fake) blinking caret (vertical bar or underscore) after the editable text the first 5 times it's displayed (per user). It will be immediately obvious and noticed. Of course it must be avoided if there are multiple inputs at once: you can't have multiple inputs focused (unless you want to type simultaneously the same text on all ...


2

Don't create a dead zone Assuming you allow both horizontal and vertical swipes and only horizontal and vertical swipes then I see no reason not to simply say that if your swipe is within 45° of horizontal treat as a horizontal swipe and within 45° of vertical, treat it as a vertical swipe. I'm not sure there a need for a dead zone on the middle where it ...


2

Having multiple behaviors for the same gesture makes sense to me if the behaviors are similar and are all on local objects/contexts. In your case, since the swiping sideways acts as a change screen action, overloading the gesture to an expand/open action does not make sense. I would go with a double tap or long tap to expand/open items (rows/objects) ...


2

An icon should perform the same action whether it is in your app or a desktop widget. From your description, it sounds like there is a lot of overlap between the two buttons, but that you want the one on your website to perform additional functions. To do this, you should have two icons on your desktop widget. One that performs the functions that are ...



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