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45

You could use several cues to reinforce each other: Background getting slightly darker at more difficulty. Use a star - which is a positive symbol, whatever the difficulty. Use more of the stars for more difficult levels Use colours for the stars. For example:


38

I would suggest going with a bar loading screen which basically informs the user that content is loading and you are preparing them for an unique experience. You can also try to engage the user by informing them about the game and the experience offered For example Empire total war informs the user about what he can experience in the game This game ...


34

In an actual plane, the steering column isn't really pulled up or down. Instead the pilot pushes the steering wheel or joystick away to dive, and pulls it towards him to pull up. Same goes for games which you control with a joystick. You push it away to go forward, and back to go backward. This forward and backward motion is most probably why inverted ...


28

From a strictly usability perspective (a subset of all that’s UX), here’re some lessons and advice I’ve gathered: Games should be about mastering the game-world, not mastering the user interface. “My hope is that the designers of these games learn from the mistakes of the GUI, rather than reinventing that old wheel and inheriting all its problems.” More ...


18

I would recommend going with a combination of pictures and colors to convey information as studies have shown that children relate to bright and vivid colors better as mentioned in this article Ever notice that toys, books and children's web sites usually contain large blocks of bright, primary colors? Young children prefer these colors and respond ...


16

Call Of Duty: Advanced Warfare has a practice shooting range as a loading screen, which enhances the user experience by allowing users to practice without consequences. Depending on your game you add a mini-game which enhances regular gameplay. Because your game is so small, it should load within a few seconds up to maybe 20 seconds on a slow connection so a ...


14

This book has been brought up many times on this site: http://artofgamedesign.com/ Megasweet. Games are unique from a UX perspective because you have (almost) limitless control over the context you create for the game-player. You have their undivided attention. They want to be lost in your world. Contrast that with ho-hum ;) UX the rest of us practice. ...


13

Here is a nice explanation from What Grinds My Gears: Flight simulators were one of the first three-dimensional PC games where the mouse could be used as a controller, to control the orientation of the camera (in other words, the airplane). The most natural mapping of the mouse axes to control the "aircraft" was, of course, to simulate the movement of ...


10

Casino Interfaces I'm not in the casino industry anymore, so I'd like to share a few tips. Enjoy. Casino games are a unique subset of the game industry. The audience for these games may be older. They want graphics that look and behave like classic games. The interface must easily allow for purchasing credits Since casino gaming are constantly monetized, ...


10

You can have the players click the cards themselves, and then you use a visual indication on the card itself, preferably an indication that suggests that the card will be passed, e.g. an arrow. As to which cards to select - I'd let them select the cards to pass. They are selecting items and then performing an action, so it makes more sense to select the ...


10

There are some comics stereotypes that are related to the knowledge - you can use them - for example - little girl in pink dress with flowers (easy), then girl with schoolbag - medium and girl with glasses, pile of books and pencil behind the ear - hard. The same icons can be created with boy faces - depending on the player gender, or with two kids on the ...


10

This may be a bit wacky but I would use a child pushing a rock up a hill image / cartoon. Something like this: I'd keep making the rock bigger for the harder versions. I felt that's one image which is clear and universally accessible. Alternatively, something like the image below:


9

It's better to be consistent with other games rather than doing it opposite for the sake on being different. As we read from left to right and go the opposite direction when deleting, undoing. I believe this is the reason why it is so. We have certain mental models like this set up and going against them creates a kind of friction in the user. Imagine ...


8

Animation in its very basic form is used to signify change. Whether that's a change in relationship between elements or the status of an element itself, doesn't matter. However, this is when you look at animation in the context of animation vs no animation. If you take it out of that context, animation is like color, pattern, shape, etc. It's just another ...


8

It is a carryover from arcade games. When the users insert their coins, it is undesirable to have the game begin right away (especially when the coin slots were typically at knee level). They served other purposes as well: One of the ways I like to do this is with an attract loop. This was made popular by arcade games that needed to keep changing ...


7

How about each button showing a different number of daggers/guns/bombs? One for easy, two for medium and three for hard. The actual weapon/icon would depend on the context of your game. Or, if you don't have a lot of room have a different weapon/icon for each level. Obviously this only works if your game involves combat of some kind. As always icons don't ...


7

Remember when writing user-interfaces for children that you'll be dealing with a large amount of varied backgrounds and abilities. remember that some of your users will be color-blind. As such, don't simply rely on colors to differentiate. Take into account the age-level of the kids who will be using your application. For example, numbers are great when it ...


6

The standard has usually been the head of the player character. This shows a clear relationship between the lives and the character; it's almost as if you literally have 5 of that character, and then when a character dies you now have 4. Often in shooters the lives icon will show a little version of your ship, for the same reason. Hearts are a common more ...


6

I've seen a similar approach used successfully in pointer and stylus based input systems. It's called a "Pie Menu" or "Radial Menu". Radial Menus are a bit uncommon but they have very good Fitt's Law results Here's a great article about designing pie menus. Radial menus don't always have the "drag" control like your proposed menu, but it's been shown to be ...


6

You should cater the input to the particular usage. In this case it is a Hangman game, so do some research around how other Hangman games work. As some extensive research shows (i.e. doing a quick Google Images search for 'Hangman Game' it shows that the far more popular route is to take an alphabetical approach. Now, this is far from a conclusive ...


6

Its better to keep the width of both energy levels the same as you have shown in the first model. You can try something like that


6

I'm trying to avoid regular numeric keyboard input, both to make it more immersive, and also faster and easier to use. For the claimed I suggest re-think interaction when it's possible. Let's think of army. There is a little sense in army of 1 man or 66 ones. Also it's too fuzzy distinction between army of 1000 men and the one with 1002. In terms of a ...


6

I think the symbol idea you've presented in Option 2 can work well. Depending on the ease of traversal through levels though, you may not want to change the symbol for every level. For example, if there isn't great difficulty between levels 41-50, maybe they can all be represented by the same symbol. And possibly with that, when the game ends, you can ...


5

If I'm sitting down to play a game, one thing I don't want to do is read instructions. Console games don't even come with printed manuals anymore, and users are going to expect a much bigger time investment than with a web game probably. What I do want to do is: play the game. I would recommend against a video for new users - you're asking them to make a ...


5

A cartoon picture of a kid riding a bike. On level ground for the easiest level, and then 2 or 3 increasing grades to indicate more difficult levels. Alternatively, 3 or 4 different bicycles. Tricycle for easiest, then a training wheel bicycle, older child's bicycle, then racing or mountain bike.


5

Could It could work in both orientations? If you had to limit it to one. Fix the orientation and work in whichever is the "longest" Example: If its mobile portrait (go up and down) If its mobile landscape (go left to right) I think the limited space is the main factor that would effect playability. You need to take advantage of the orientation that ...


5

I believe that comes from how actual planes are controlled. If you pull back on the stick, it pulls the elevator up, which causes the plane to go upwards. I think the same thing is for the side aileron controls, pushing left causes the left aileron to move, which makes you move right.


4

Try for a book on it ? returns having found the books... I bought these two when I wanted some background on this ( not necessarily the best - but the best I could see in the store): Game Development Essentials: Game Interface Design http://www.amazon.com/Game-Development-Essentials-Interface-Design/dp/1418016209/ref=pd_bxgy_b_img_b Not a vast amount ...


4

Wowpedia has a page about the Auction House with a section dedicated to describing its UI. If you know the name of what you wish to find, simply enter all or part of it in the Name field, and click the Search button on the upper right, and the UI will return all the items that match the string you entered. Otherwise, you can search by category: on the ...


4

If all players are viewing a split screen, I would just use a standard progress bar in each player's area of the screen. It's a commonly used convention and people understand it. The second method is neat, but it could be confusing. The metaphor of "filling something up" applies to progress bars. But does it apply to your second image? The image implies ...



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