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14

For comprehensive coverage of when and how to use badging/achievements, you should definitely see the "Collectible Achievements" pattern on Designing Social Interfaces by Erin Malone and Christian Crumlish. There is expanded coverage in the book, including examples. I highly recommend the book for anyone designing anything to do with even a tiny piece of ...


10

When the student gets an answer wrong, you probably shouldn't play any sound at all. From About Face 3, chapter 25: Given the choice of no noise versus noise for negative feedback, people will choose the former. Given the choice of no noise versus soft and pleasant noises for positive feedback, however, people will choose the feedback. The ...


5

You need to beware of thinking of a wrong answer as a "user error". Your application's purpose is to tell the user whether their entered answer is correct or not. An incorrect answer is not an "error" as such, and shouldn't be treated like "invalid input". It's valid input that happens to be the wrong answer. (Carried to extremes, applying 'error handling' ...


5

Depends on the look and feel of the game and the game mechanics, but you should try and match the sounds to the feel of the graphics and pace you want to achieve, how rewarded a person should feel for answering a single question, versus passing a level, etc. Examples: if you use avatars(illustrations of people), record someone saying "Correct!" or ...


3

The best way to minimize bias in voting is to have random contestant ordering. Any ordering other than random will introduce a bias that favors what appears at the top, whether it's the ones already winning, those who come alphabetically first, or whatever other consistent sorting you choose. To allow contestants to provide 'vote for me' links, you can use ...


2

Depends on your target audience. I can think of some sounds 11 year olds would find 100% appropriate, while mature audiences might not...


2

Googling around I found three books explaining to some degree the difference between 'Point-and-click' and what they call 'Direct-Control'. Book: Game Design Secrets Book: Fundamentals of Game Design Book: Andrew Rollings and Ernest Adams on Game Design Although they state that Point-and-click has been the standard for years in adventure-games, action ...


2

It may depend on where the emphasis is meant to go, and from there it could be related to culture. In the English-speaking world, we read from left to right, top to bottom. That's why it's general practice in newspapers to have the heading and initial print on the top / top left, and picture on the right (and of course, this interesting stuff above the ...


1

UX concepts do apply to videogame design, but this is possibly less about micro-interaction analysis and more about larger design direction. Some principles from HCI and UX that work well in videogames include: Consistency Notice how all platformers use the same visual clues for elements that can be interacted with in the same way? Seen how creatures with ...


1

Of course HCI applies, and you should always have your mind on User Centered Design (UCD). A game application is no different from any other application when it comes to User Experience. However, and this is important, you should never implement strict usability conventions if they interfere with your gaming experience. The most simple (and I admit, a silly ...


1

I agree that random ordering is best and you should provide an option to "show more" entries, so the user can keep exposing themselves to more and more random entries, if they want. Also, it makes sense to have a link to show the top entries, even if it's not the first point of exposure to the entries. Every entry should have its own "page" so that people ...


1

Penny Arcade's Extra Credits show on Gamifying Education has some interesting ideas. One of them is to reward community achievements by giving bonus points to the entire community. For example, when a student or five students reach a certain threshold, give 100 bonus points to every community member. I think that makes sense for your problem. Actions that ...


1

Regardless of the actual sound you choose, the sound for "correct" should be higher (in term of frequency). Think of TV games with bells ringing (high) and a buzzer (low). If you play a chord or a melody, you can use a major versus a minor scale.


1

You might find the sounds used by Slot Machines to be useful. IIRC, Casino slot machines only give audible feedback for success - failure is silent. And, all of the beeps and tones and melodies are played in the key of G Major, so that all of the sounds of all the machines in the same space merge together in a way that doesn't clash. So, perhaps some kind ...


1

I'm actually in the process of designing a new site that will use badges to declare users and rewards. It really gives a site that game feeling which plays off the human addiction to collect things and fulfillment of being rewarded. It's very crucial that you take time to design and establish the entire reward process so users will quickly adapt and will ...



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