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22

You've somewhat discovered the answer to your own question. The best time to include development in the design process depends on the development team you are working with. Your initial intuition is correct...get the developers in sooner than later. Ideally, they are a part of the design process from the beginning. They have insights and ideas that can ...


18

This is not the definite answer, but perhaps you can try to think of the difference between UI/UX and front-end development as the difference between design and implementation. The problem is that UX designers tend to come from either a graphic design or software development background, and so there are naturally overlaps between their role and that of a '...


17

The Sharing Mockups stage is too late Assuming you want the developers fully engaged and understanding the reasoning behind the design and decisions made then you should have them in a UX Design Workshop - before mockups are done In my typical workshop I'd Explore related User Stories Itemise concepts user will be thinking about Do multiple UI ideas ...


14

A metaphor I sometimes use is the difference between an architect and a construction foreman, working to build a building. A foreman can build a building herself--she's built buildings before, she knows generally what goes where, and she knows how to actually put screws and nails and wood and plaster together to form a structure. However, the foreman has ...


14

The easiest way to fix it is make them the same people. Hire people with both UX and development skills. Knowing code makes your UX better, because you know what is possible and what the impact of your UX decisions are. Knowing UX makes your code better, because you can prevent development decisions from compromising the experience. They're ultimately two ...


9

Normally, I prefer to start with a example which may not be the project core but explains the client the philosophy behind. And once the client understand the concept he starts believing in you and then you should bring in the core topic. Let me explain you with an example. First try to explain you Front-end and Back-end idea with reference to something he ...


9

First off, it's not wrong of the client to refer to the admin side as back-end. It's actually fairly common terminology to call any aspects of a content management system that aren't publicly available the "back end." This confusion between the front and back end of a CMS and the front and back end of code may be a large part of the problem you're ...


8

If I were to diagram the range of skills each has: <-- Art & Design Computer Science --> | ------------- Web Designer ------------| | --------- Front End Developer ---------| | --------- Back End Developer ---------| That, of course, is just a general ...


7

From what I have experienced, it is rather a problem of team management than a problem specific to UX VS. Developers. Each company will have the risk of two teams being in a competition, whether it is the cooks VS. the dishwashers in a restaurant, the drivers VS. the mechanics in a bus company, etc. Based on that, try to reduce group separation. Having ...


5

Actually, I would be surprised if the development work isn't pixel perfect. Developers need logic and rules for programming, and if you are not supplying them with a style guide that they can plug into their development framework then I should think they will be asking you a question every five minutes about the spacing or alignment or hex value for the ...


5

straight away. For various reasons: they can give insight that you would never get from anyone else; can flag technical limitations very early; become emotionally attached to the project.


4

Involve developers in the design process. This helps developers understand what how and why the design is the way it is, and it helps the designers understand any technical limitations there may be and look to create a design which enables it. It also helps create empathy amongst teams to understand what each other are working towards. There should be a ...


4

I'm not sure if this question really belongs into this forum, but since I think I know quite well what you mean, I dare to write an 'answer' anyways: IMHO The larger the company and the bigger the business –> the more likely you will find yourself in a team of highly specialised people. Teams of developers are split into front-end and back-end ("wait! I ...


4

According to Bill Buxton "We are NOT all designers", although "we are all potential participants in the design process", but design is "a profession as reach as math or medicine" that cannot be performed without experience and knowledge. Although the designer must process and evaluate all possible contributions, the final design is the designer's role and ...


4

I am a developer with about the same design talent as the average rutabaga. I think you may be asking the wrong question - you should probably be asking "As a designer, how can I most quickly gain the trust of the developers on my team?" Most of the "designers" I have worked with were developers whose management told them they were now designers, and then ...


3

In my company this is how it goes: Interaction Designers are tasked with conceptualizing, and implementing high fidelity wireframes to give to the visual designer. Wireframes are annotated (this means we specify what certain elements do what, like if a modal pops up, we want it to bounce three times for instance). Once we have all the wireframes annotated ...


3

It entirely depend on your organizational structure as to who would be responsible to transform the psd designs to html/css. But in a typical scenario, a designer is expected to take up their PSD files and prepare a set of image assets to be used in HTML/CSS and also create a specification document defining all styles used alongwith sizes. This ...


3

User Experience is something that many people claim to do but few do it well, the reason there is so much work out there for people who only do user experience (and are not visual designers and/or front end coders). Usually the larger the project the higher the need to have a dedicated user experience person / team. It's much like constructing a building. ...


3

It bears being said: The reason to stick with it is because it is the standard, and standards are empowering. A 'browser' is a complex class creature. It includes screen readers and other systems for non-standard display. If you haven't read what Accessibility is about, check chapter 3 of the Government usability guidelines Remember that ...


3

I am a developer, and the designers on my team work pretty closely with us. We set it up so we have the opportunity to raise questions and give input when the designers give us designs, but then when the decision is being finalized, the designers get to decide and we don't get a vote. Get input from people who care, but establish a clear boundary between ...


2

Ideal solution is that UX and Front End Dev aren't separate departments run by different managers and housed in different org charts. How practical that solution is entirely dependent on your corporate structure. I find the bigger the corporate structure, the more segregation there is between each individual component of the process. What happens where ...


2

One way is to educate your customer. Let him read Wikipedia and ask him if he sees a difference between his current knowledge and the article: The front end is responsible for collecting input in various forms from the user and processing it to conform to a specification the back end can use. The front end is an interface between the user and the back ...


2

reference: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Front_and_back_ends Front end is what the user sees and interacts with. Back end is what will process the data. The back end may leverage formatting and validation made by the front end or perform these tasks itself; e.g. when front end is limited to user input and validation is done server-side.


2

Front-end and back-end are terms used to characterize program interfaces and services relative to the initial user of these interfaces and services. (The "user" may be a human being or a program.) A "front-end" application is one that application users interact with directly. A "back-end" application or program serves indirectly in support of the front-...


2

Both of these terms are an unfortunate by-product of the industry's preoccupation with rigid role separation. In the most general sense, a web designer is a designer who designs for the web environment, whereas a front-end developer develops primarily for the client-side portion of the web environment (the browser). Realistically, a web designer is the ...


2

Personally, I love Balsamiq because it allows you to focus on the information and interaction, and not needless details. This is right level for functional design that has to be passed around and agreed upon. However, this has to be translated into detailed specific layout. This is best done by the actual developer, and possibly with an agile review cycle ...


2

A customer probably doesn't need to know or care what a back end or a front end is. To the user it is simply a website and all they are worried about is the website to working to do what they need. The complexity of the details like this are things that we concern ourselves with, not them, so trying to explain to the customer is defeating the purpose of ...


2

You could open your open company. You could find work at a small company; the smaller the company the better chance the developer has of making the decisions and design. Try jobs like Technical Product Manager where you may be expected to do some of both design and coding. Get a job as a developer in a "not too rigid" company, and make sure to get involved ...


2

Wait, you can be that guy on a big company too. I was in the same position. I work in a big company (big => 300k people) as a UX designer. All the dev's in my project are oriented to take care of the backend. So, it's not surprise that our web and mobile interface are terrible. The guy who was developing frontend here is using primefaces (how i miss the 90'...


1

You asked why we don't use AJAX techniques more: to me the key is in the word 'rely' that you used later in that paragraph. AJAX relies on JavaScript; some users disable JavaScript in their browsers, for whatever reason, which precludes them from viewing AJAX-driven content as intended, meaning you would still need the standard refresh as a fallback. The ...



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