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11

The easiest way to fix it is make them the same people. Hire people with both UX and development skills. Knowing code makes your UX better, because you know what is possible and what the impact of your UX decisions are. Knowing UX makes your code better, because you can prevent development decisions from compromising the experience. They're ultimately two ...


10

This is not the definite answer, but perhaps you can try to think of the difference between UI/UX and front-end development as the difference between design and implementation. The problem is that UX designers tend to come from either a graphic design or software development background, and so there are naturally overlaps between their role and that of a ...


8

First off, it's not wrong of the client to refer to the admin side as back-end. It's actually fairly common terminology to call any aspects of a content management system that aren't publicly available the "back end." This confusion between the front and back end of a CMS and the front and back end of code may be a large part of the problem you're ...


6

Normally, I prefer to start with a example which may not be the project core but explains the client the philosophy behind. And once the client understand the concept he starts believing in you and then you should bring in the core topic. Let me explain you with an example. First try to explain you Front-end and Back-end idea with reference to something he ...


6

From what I have experienced, it is rather a problem of team management than a problem specific to UX VS. Developers. Each company will have the risk of two teams being in a competition, whether it is the cooks VS. the dishwashers in a restaurant, the drivers VS. the mechanics in a bus company, etc. Based on that, try to reduce group separation. Having ...


5

A metaphor I sometimes use is the difference between an architect and a construction foreman, working to build a building. The foreman can build a building herself--she's built buildings before, she knows generally what goes where, and she knows how to actually put screws and nails and wood and plaster together to form a structure. However, the foreman has ...


3

Involve developers in the design process. This helps developers understand what how and why the design is the way it is, and it helps the designers understand any technical limitations there may be and look to create a design which enables it. It also helps create empathy amongst teams to understand what each other are working towards. There should be a ...


3

User Experience is something that many people claim to do but few do it well, the reason there is so much work out there for people who only do user experience (and are not visual designers and/or front end coders). Usually the larger the project the higher the need to have a dedicated user experience person / team. It's much like constructing a building. ...


3

In my company this is how it goes: Interaction Designers are tasked with conceptualizing, and implementing high fidelity wireframes to give to the visual designer. Wireframes are annotated (this means we specify what certain elements do what, like if a modal pops up, we want it to bounce three times for instance). Once we have all the wireframes annotated ...


3

It entirely depend on your organizational structure as to who would be responsible to transform the psd designs to html/css. But in a typical scenario, a designer is expected to take up their PSD files and prepare a set of image assets to be used in HTML/CSS and also create a specification document defining all styles used alongwith sizes. This ...


3

It bears being said: The reason to stick with it is because it is the standard, and standards are empowering. A 'browser' is a complex class creature. It includes screen readers and other systems for non-standard display. If you haven't read what Accessibility is about, check chapter 3 of the Government usability guidelines Remember that ...


2

Personally, I love Balsamiq because it allows you to focus on the information and interaction, and not needless details. This is right level for functional design that has to be passed around and agreed upon. However, this has to be translated into detailed specific layout. This is best done by the actual developer, and possibly with an agile review cycle ...


1

You asked why we don't use AJAX techniques more: to me the key is in the word 'rely' that you used later in that paragraph. AJAX relies on JavaScript; some users disable JavaScript in their browsers, for whatever reason, which precludes them from viewing AJAX-driven content as intended, meaning you would still need the standard refresh as a fallback. The ...


1

One way is to educate your customer. Let him read Wikipedia and ask him if he sees a difference between his current knowledge and the article: The front end is responsible for collecting input in various forms from the user and processing it to conform to a specification the back end can use. The front end is an interface between the user and the back ...


1

reference: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Front_and_back_ends Front end is what the user sees and interacts with. Back end is what will process the data. The back end may leverage formatting and validation made by the front end or perform these tasks itself; e.g. when front end is limited to user input and validation is done server-side.


1

Design doesn't mean you have to code. In fact, a lot of designers would be rather offended if you asked them to code. Software design involves a lot of user research to figure out how people are actually going to interact with the software, whereas front-end development codes the interface. Sometimes, one person will do both jobs, but this can be ...


1

The words that you used in the question provides the answer. Wed design has more focus on the designing aspect of the task, where as front-end development deals more with the implementation side of the task. Of course, there are overlapping skill sets between the two roles (e.g. CSS, HTML, Javascript), and in many cases the two jobs are done by the same ...


1

Dave, Could I suggest a slightly different approach. Instead of thinking of these are policies, you can look at this in MVP (minimum viable product) terms. That means for example browser support, you could take a decision and just go with the one browser or say webkit based browsers as the focus. Doesn't mean that it'll not work with others, but the effort ...


1

Policy decisions regarding development tend to be an ongoing discussion rather than a few rules set in stone. The fluid nature of IT requires a slightly more agile approach than just a PDF with the company's laws. Wikis I'd recommend using a wiki-style framework. A lot of developers tend to be familiar enough with that and will want to contribute to it. ...


1

Front-end and back-end are terms used to characterize program interfaces and services relative to the initial user of these interfaces and services. (The "user" may be a human being or a program.) A "front-end" application is one that application users interact with directly. A "back-end" application or program serves indirectly in support of the ...


1

A customer probably doesn't need to know or care what a back end or a front end is. To the user it is simply a website and all they are worried about is the website to working to do what they need. The complexity of the details like this are things that we concern ourselves with, not them, so trying to explain to the customer is defeating the purpose of ...


1

Ideal solution is that UX and Front End Dev aren't separate departments run by different managers and housed in different org charts. How practical that solution is entirely dependent on your corporate structure. I find the bigger the corporate structure, the more segregation there is between each individual component of the process. What happens where ...


1

Though I like J. Jeffryes answer,my primary challenge with that is that not only are people who can code and design expensive,they dont really have time to focus on multiple tasks in parallel i.e. code and design at the same time.Also throw in the mix of having to attend UI reviews, usability testing sessions,code reviews and product management stuff and you ...



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