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0

How I see this situation: for some users, additional features are available. It is useful that you display the inputs for the others. You can display a message to highlight that more options are possible (if users really can change this and if you want to highlight this).


0

Simply locking them in field will be strange and could be harmful for users. Take the point of view of the user, not the system. "I can't edit some informations, alright, explain me why? So... why there is fields?" Showing locked information out of the field could be better, and of course, explaining why I can't edit them could much better. Maybe ...


0

Showing disabled input fields can be useful because it indicates to the user that there are additional options or that the information can be edited in different circumstances. If there is a benefit in your particular application for the user to know that this information is editable in a certain scenario (the correct role), then you could show them as ...


0

I'd flatten out multi-level stuff in a single linear sequence of steps, eventually skipping forward/backwards more than one as needed, I'm thinking something similar to Microsoft SQL Server setup. Let's say your wizard needs the user to input two multilevel objects O1 and O2, the interface could look like this: download bmml source – Wireframes ...


0

I think it is a good idea to use this waiting time to highlight something, the logo (minimalist and simply) or a competitive advantage of the product.


1

Let me see if I understand you (because I think you're overthinking the problem). As a user I want to associate a person with an item. I look up a person (Josh); think I have the correct information and then realize that I have the wrong Josh and start to edit the information. (Or maybe I have Josh's updated phone number and the system is out of date so I ...


1

You might want to look at how Google's Material design solves this with its concept of chips. So in your case once the user links to a person, it is displayed on the screen as a chip. The user can could then remove the chip (unlink) or add a new chip (link a different person). Here's a link to the design guide on chips: Google Material Design Chip ...


0

This is real-time email validation service and quite a few companies have started offering it. For example, you can take a look at LeadSpend real-time email verification. Quoting from their website: Validate emails instantly at the point of collection and make sure accurate data is entering your system. Whether you’re obtaining email addresses ...


0

Using the asterisk in whatever prominent colour you want and showing a legend or calling it out above the form [*-Required fields] would help.


2

Any rule for the specific color of the asterisk (or anything else, except for very strong conventions like a traffic light metaphor) is a red herring. When you design a form, you must know what happens to it, or what the user needs at any given moment. During the initial filling of the form, the user focuses his attention on the fields one at a time, ...


-1

These are generally the domain names they test. For example, they only allow Emails from say, the popular email domains such as Gmail, Yahoo, Outlook, Live, Hotmail, etc. A popular Email service I use to keep away from Spam is Mailinator However, some email validation forms seem to also block this particular domain for the same reason. It is effective ...


0

Why not avoid having the user specify the postal code at all? Have the application look it up based on the address.


2

From what I understand, I wouldn't go an ask the user what he wants to do, because we'll assume that this is the wanted action. In such a case, you'd need to provide a draft-save; as some required fields aren't filled in yet. Due note, that a good working auto-save isn't that trivial, as you need to think about a lot more now. For instance, the biggest ...


0

Scrolling to 30: takes a long scroll. Not a good UX, IMHO. Keyboard numpad: requires validation afterwards. Slider: hard to use for accurate actions. Solution: Build your own widget. That listed all possible numbers in one window. Actually, this is the standard for choosing a date in a calendar. Thus, you can create something similar


0

If you require exact times, use either text input or a drop-down. If approximate times are acceptable, use a slider. Personally, I'd opt for a dropdown as I think they are faster and less cognitive load, especially with small data sets or easily scannable lists such as sequential numbers.


0

It's good practice to have a default value so as to always show feedback without requiring the user to dive deeper. (What that default would be should be researched with users and possibly a become a user-set preference.) With that in mind, the slider version works best. However, sliders can be difficult to precisely control especially using touch. Perhaps ...


2

At issue is not the particular color you choose but rather that you indicate to the user that the element is read-only. The UX part is telling users that this element functions differently than other elements (and of course gray is the color normally used for this purpose). Ultimately this is more of a question for your graphic designers and, by the way, ...


0

You could introduce some color to your form inputs such as border or placeholder color and then lower the opacity when disabled. You can also toy with overlaying a "disabled" looking background to the input field.


0

Though there has been a lot of focus on language in the other answers (which is an important consideration), I believe that the key focus should be on heuristics (this Smashing Magazine article provides a great introduction into heuristics). The Default Effect For your question it's very important to consider the default effect, in that people have the ...


0

Instead of checkbox you can try with the toggle switches(on/off). Now days most the forms you find this kind of options. Please have a look at the below images to get an idea. ![toggle switch][2]


0

Labels for check-boxes should always be phrased in a positive/active way. As a rule of thumb, consider your alternative without the verbs: comments in this post It’s obvious that an empty check-box next to this label means ‘disable’ (or ‘forbid’) and a filled one stands for ‘allow’ (or ‘enable’). You may make it explicit for sure – you may even be ...


1

Think of it via the form perspective. Checkboxes are commonly used to add to the existing form (ex: add me to your newsletter, remember me, etc). So in the perspective it should be "add comments to your post" where a check will enable it. Putting disable with a check is kind of contradictory: I'm "adding" a disable? Also to add to what you're asking ...


1

Possitive wording The general rule is that positive wording is better in general since it's easier to interpret and tends to be shorter which is always good in checkboxs' labels. Microsoft agrees with these in their guidelines. If it is the case of a blogpost, I think it's not a big deal, since users should later be able to delete the comments and ...


0

I would certainly not recommend arranging the panels in a grid layout like shown in the picture. Instead a linear arrangement would be neat and easy on the eyes considering the formal nature of this application. A grid layout might be convenient on something like information portals like excite.com Alternatively as a solution to the question I would ...


1

I would also suggest you make the box red rather than green. Green gives off the feeling it is completed successfully, IMO red would imply more action is required.


2

Not a full answer, but your approach #1 is wrong, as you likely guessed. Bank of America has a similar page when transferring money between accounts or to a friend's account. You pick the from account, the to account, the total amount, the date of the transfer, then hit next. Then you're on the "review everything" page. Once you click "complete transfer", ...


1

No toggle at first; this instead: “Please provide gender.” User clicks, sees this: “[x ] Male” User makes a choice: “[ o] Female” Like that?


2

You could use an indeterminate toggle switch, see Bootstrap Switch or Flip Toggle Switch for examples on how to do this. Then you just append the event to fire validation. As for styling, you'll notice in the examples above they use the closure principle of gestalt to communicate there's a state that needs user to complete it to avoid uncertainty. So, in ...


2

There's nothing wrong or unexpected about a dropdown opening upwards. It happens quite a lot. In fact I wouldn't be surprised if you've seen it yourself, many many times. You just don't question it because it's instinctive. If a dropdown is going to open 'below the fold' then it often opens upwards. It happens on sites like Amazon for example: So ...


3

I encountered something very similar. Our solution was to hide the radio button options with an EDIT link and add a SAVE button for validation, then re-hide. Worked for our situation.


3

You could try making the toggle start in the center of the switch. Then once the user starts interacting with it it toggles only to the on/off states, the centered position is just the default "unset" state. I imagine this would be a bit confusing to users on first glance though so a radio button would probably be more intuitive for required fields. ...


4

Add a 'confirmation' tab last, after 'submit' (and change 'submit' text to 'summary'), so the user knows there's another section to go before they're done. It's odd for user to be on the last step in tabbed checkouts, but not be done.


1

Is there a very good reason why you are putting the confirmation page after the payment details page? Normally, one confirms their email address and shipping details, followed by the payment details (card numbers have checksums to guard against typos, negating any need for additional validation). Furthermore, most banks require some form of 2-factor ...


19

I don't like the words Submit Request - as a designer that is what pressing the button does. For a user, it is more-or-less as meaningless as Press This Button. I don't think Send Request is much better, possibly worse (where is the request going to be sent to?). I suggest Place Booking if that is what your system is about: booking a course somewhere. ...


9

You should really change the wording on your primary action buttons to make it absolutely clear. "Submitting request" or "Send request" is what your browser does when the user clicks a link or button, but "Pay for session" is what the user wants or has to do in this context to continue. By using a modal dialog you show the user that he has to complete the ...


10

Change the behavior to fit the intuition You might want to change the behavior to fit the user intuition, instead of changing the design to "make the user understand" the behavior that you originally intended. If there are no major reasons for the details to be set in stone at that point (and they aren't, since apparently they can cancel it before the ...


3

Your page gives everything equal weighting, and this is why it looks like a summary page - your instincts are correct. Pick some stuff to highlight, such as what they have bought and how much. The summary information you have here is good. My previous user testing has shown that customers really do read it and use it for correction. For that reason I don't ...


3

You should consider that your checkout funnel is too long. ( so many steps in your progress bar. Think about combining or eliminating of some steps ) , this may scary users + too many opportunities for user to leave funnel w/o converting.


73

Render the confirmation in a modal: This will highlight explicitly to the user that one more action is needed.


0

See also this tangentially related question, What's the rationale behind Google's ''no-save'' approach.


4

If each combobox is always going to have the same set of possible values, you could instead use a DataGridView with multiselectable cells, and change that "Copy to all" button into a "Set Selected Cells" button, so the user has to ctrl+click the cell they want to modify, select the value from the ComboBox and press that Button. This also lets the user select ...


2

Wow! That's an impressive settings table! Even a little scary. From the looks of it, I'm assuming this is a proprietary app you can't tell us too much about. But I'll pose a few questions just the same. Is the position of a cell meaningful to the user? If it's important that they understand how a unit relates to two relational axes, the grid presentation ...


0

Mobile phones do not have a huge screen, even phablets! I think it is better to use a 5-point scale or likert from unlikely to very likely for instance. A10-point scale, as i see in the first pic, would be more complicated for users to complete. I use 7 or 5-point scales in ux artifacts like nps for many reasons, being odd scales better than even for ...


0

I do not really think it matters if you capitalize your placeholder words or not. If you want to be consistent I would suggest going with: Search Restaurants, Cuisines, Dishes Also as far as proper wording check out Yelp, which is heavily search based, does not necessarily honor any consistency, as their search placeholders embodies all different ...


0

In cases of transactions it is essential to provide some feedback indicating whether it is complete or not. One clear example I could state is an ecommerce website. After completing a payment, not redirecting to a success page will leave the user anxious and confused. A non-monetary transaction that may require a success/ failure acknowledgment could be a ...


0

This will depend upon the business flow a bit more than the actual aesthetics. If your user is required to continue using/ accessing relevant information on the same page, "pop-up" is the answer. If trying to "contact sales" is not bringing discontinuity to the business flow or overall experience, you can redirect to a separate page. Hope this helps.


0

This answer is nearly a duplicate of a question answered earlier today, but I don't know how to close and redirect your question. Keep the search button for the search box For a long time, now, these have been the Nielssen Norman Group's published guidelines (available for purchase, not free). They sum up as follows: Have an easily identifiable ...


2

Yes, Nielsen Norman Group have reported on the research. Here's a summary. Yes, provide a search button for the search box For a long time, these were the unchanging research-based published guidelines (available for purchase, not free): Have an easily identifiable search box in the upper right-hand corner of the page, with an open-text field ...


0

Are you looking for something like a price range? (via tweakers.net) You can probably find a template or plugin of your liking online somewhere. If you need more than just a single selected range, though, you'll have to implement something more like what Stewart mentioned.


4

1. Pre-filling a text input increases cognitive load The function of a text input is to get text from a user. We need to tell a user what kind of text we are expecting and this can be done using labels, placeholders, inline hints, etc. A label directly above the text input is the best way to communicate what a user should input. As you have already ...



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