New answers tagged

0

Whenever I have seen crosses used, they never look like close or delete crosses - they are typically stylised crosses. However, you rarely see crosses being used - it is almost always ticks being used these days, so don't deviate from convention by doing something different. Also, keep it simple - every time you customise or deviate from convention you ...


0

Crosses for checkboxes are confusing. Instead to let the user see the action of check the field was completed, the "x" seems to indicate an error. I didn't see this before and I really hope this will not be a trend.


0

I would't risk using check boxes with crosses. You've analyzed pretty well why. It's best to stick with standard web components and avoid breaking consistency because for me this is one of the most valid usability heuristics!


0

What I understand for your design is you want the user save first the data in English, then duplicate the product and edit it for other languages. Also, I understand you want to add options that offer an automatic translation. In this case, I like your solutions with tabs, because you offer a small number of choices. I don't really see why you think you ...


0

If I understood your question correctly, the objective of your project is : Develop an application that will have custom-forms. The application will have multiple languages including rtl ( Arabic,etc). In this case, I would recommend your solution Make the language into tabs so user can easily see other language for comparison All you need to ...


0

For a good design giving feedback to user is most important. You can give a message with timer like Your Changes will be Auto Saved in 58 Sec..(Timer keeps on decreasing) On the header bar along with the Save button. User can click the Save button any time but the auto save will be done after every 1 minutes. This way you are not forcing user to keep on ...


0

I'm not sure that I fully understand your question but my interpretation of it is "When should an autosave enabled page trigger the autosave mechanism?" If this is the case then it depends on your use case and the amount of processing power your users will have access to: Ideally, you would work like Google Docs where every single keystroke triggers an ...


1

I think when you are looking at a one-off selection, the size of the button would certainly have some impact on the way a user makes the selection (think about the way home pages or landing pages on websites are designed to draw attention to certain call-to-actions). They often do this by emphasizing the size, colour or styling of these buttons, to both ...


0

Your design shows current progress but it doesn't indicate how many steps are left and any form of navigation. Something like this will solve your problem. While showing progress it also splits into a set number of steps. also the visual elements allows the user to be able to jump to previous steps but not steps that are ahead unless the present form is ...


0

Another possibility to indicate how much remains to be done is to use a count of the steps based on which field within the form has focus so rather than x% complete you could display Step n of m where m is the total number of fields and n is the index of the field that currently has focus plus the total number of the fields on the preceding pages. This would ...


4

Presently your idea is great but if you want to show the number of screens in a minimal way then one way to do this is to segment it into different screens and provide the link at every checkpoint. By using this method it is easier to go back, skip and if the screens are at most 10 then it is easy to calculate too.


2

I would do the following: Either go with radio buttons or a segmented control to really show that this is a multiple choice - single answer question. Of course you can style them so they look something like this. Put the labels for the icons (BIKE and CAR) below the icons, but inside the circle (or whatever you end up using). Increase the font size and ...


1

Thanks for pointing out this behavior. I do it too, completing forms without examining them. This is the kind of thing that makes us want to call users stupid. Of course they're not, they're just taking shortcuts through the parts of the site that they'd rather not be in. The obvious answer, I think, is to rearrange the fields so the password field is last. ...


1

I think this is a real case where a user is expecting an established design pattern (that of a username field followed immediately by a password field, or a username field, password field & confirm password field together) and is being tripped up by encountering something else. In this instance, the cost is that passwords are being typed into clear-text ...


0

In addition to all these suggestions I would like to add the usage of iconography. If you or anyone of your team can make it look appropriate it will present more clarity to the user. You can also consider of making the Password field as the last item.


2

Label the fields clearly (high contrast between font and background). Make sure that there is enough space between the fields to avoid misclicks and the likes. Ensure that labels are closest to the corresponding input field compared to any other form input Don't solely rely on inline labels as those disappear usually when you start typing. Ensure that the ...


1

The simple answer is you cannot stop people doing stupid things. This is what makes us human rather than a robot. As designers, all we can do is devise as many guard rails in your design as you can, but these cannot totally eliminate all dumb behaviour - there will always be someone who will do something stupid that totally surprises you. I doubt your ...


0

This feels like the time to use a modal. This is something that impedes their progress and aside from fixing a typo in the card number they provided, they can't remedy it through your UI. That seems like sufficient reason to take precedence over the form data and "force" them to read the message.


0

I would guess that any of the following could be the cause: The Designer did not think of this The Product Owner or BSA did not specify it The Developer was too junior so didnt know how to do it The widget used did not alow it The tech stack they used prevented it The security policy vetoed it There wasn't enough time to do anything fancy (e.g, MVP) The ...


2

Looking at the image, the first thing that is somewhat similar came to my mind was, Windows Registry Editor. According to me there are 2 changes you could do, they are: 1) Keeping three columns as it is and just removing (replacing) top and below buttons of ADD,DELETE, SAVE & CANCEL. 2) Changing layout to two columns and on double click of attribute ...


1

In our program we showed an empty list with a message saying something like "Select your criteria and click Search."and users hated it. Apparently some were thinking that there were no employees in the list. We end up showing the first page (10 records) of the unfiltered list. I personally like the idea of showing the most recently "used" records. Meaning ...


2

Dependending on the type of information you need in your app, I too think a Facebook login can help with a quick start, like Paul mentioned. Rewarding people for filling out their user profile also works great. Have a look at LinkedIn for example, telling you via mail or after login that you've completed 70% of your profile. You'll be amazed what a simple ...


0

A complex, manual, redundant process is not more “secure”, it’s actually error-prone, and encourages users to try to circumvent the system. The way to best ensure that errors are prevented, speed up the process, raise the barrier to forgery, and encourage user happiness all at the same time is to cut out the human input. Let computers do the busywork. That’...


1

As was pointed out in a comment, I would revisit the idea of using a multiline text field instead. I'm sure you can find a way to watch for changes -- for example, on Android, there's a TextWatcher class you can use. Another option is to make the field look like a text field, but open up a dialog when it is clicked. If you still opt for an edit button, ...


0

I would have it break under the text area unless there are other form items that may be edited in this fashion. In which case having it flow in line like that is great. If this is a standalone text area then break it to the next line.


3

The approach that you have used here is reasonable but it needs some tweaks to make the user better understand the flow of the validation process. As a user, I would prefer to have the details that have to be filled first to be kept on top and once the user fills the details they can click the find & match button to enable the unique identity field. ...


4

Actually you have already answered your half of the question. Que - "If the system knows all the data, why can't the user just input the unique ID?" Ans - "The reason for this breakdown in input and validation is an extra security measure." But the important thing here is the flow. Current Flow (doesn't make any sense): Step 1: Personal Details Check ...


0

Replace all short (>=5) lists in comboboxes with button ranges, as explained here https://uxdesign.cc/design-better-forms-96fadca0f49c Yes, having a precise entry input form is a good idea. Consider using a sliding wheel with values (like in the iOS date picker) for weight and age, it is easier to operate than slider on touch. Your search list might ...


2

I think you're on the right track. However, I do think you need to consider a few things. Multi-step forms My wife's parents own a farm and you never know what can happen on any given day (tractor breaking down, missing cows, faulty livestock scales, etc) so I would provide: a way for the user to select which part of the multi-step form they want to ...


2

In terms of a users experience whatever is fastest will be best. If you can get all records on the page and search them in the memory of the browser faster than you can send a search request over the wire that will be the better way of doing it. Unless you can know why people would be searching the employee records in some way I don't think you can possibly ...


4

Here's a different idea, what about a department list? Just brainstorming in terms of what people might be doing when it comes to looking at a list of employees. If I know the name of the person I'm looking for, I'll directly search for that. I'm guessing the 2nd most common case would probably be "I know the person is in XYZ department". Instead of ...


0

Several things spring to mind. My first thought is about the possible similarity with online chat support. I've come across two types of chat support. One where you can't interact until you're connected with an agent, and one where you can already formulate your question(s) while you wait. I don't know in what way this might be applicable to your situation, ...


1

The rule in ecommerce is to NEVER return an empty page after search. Show similar items or when the search query is to incoherent, show popular items or items on sale. But you're asking about default. If there's room you could show something. Recent searches would be a good one. Facebook displays those if you linger in the search box for a few seconds. I ...


5

Unlike B2C shopping sites where you can display a list of popular items or new promotions, there is nothing useful that you can display when it comes to finding employees, so a simple search field would suffice. You might also want to consider including a department filter if it help the user to narrow down the search criteria (assuming your data model ...


2

It sounds very important to the business that this information be exactly correct. You're right--it could be done with just a primary key entry, however, being this strict with the matching process decreases the likelihood of mistakes or incorrect matches. I have worked on a similar project where we validate data based on user-uploaded documents, and there ...


1

I can think of three reasons: Security -- requiring multi-factor authentication of the database record is a pretty effective security measure; very important for sensitive data like voter records. Error checking -- it's very easy to make a mistake when entering a number. It would be easy to attribute the scan to the wrong individual, many times over. The ...


2

It seems like security matters the designers of the system, not UX. The identification process is indeed confusing and, from first site, does not make sense. I would like to raise another point. You are saying: ...the unique identifier might contain tiny errors (like one digit smudged or missing)... But in case the name and address are are strictly ...


0

I'll start with the stat of image recognition in general, It is getting better but still has a long way to go. The process would seem very straightforward if the user can enter his/her ID into the system first. It will break the process into minimal and simple steps - Actions: 1. Enter the ID 2. Scan the document Outcome: 1. If it's a match - nothing ...


0

I am not 100% sure what data you are using and not using, but is sounds like you capture data at some point from the user then you are asking the user to input the data again. If you have this data already recorded you can display the data to the user. Say you ask for a users name on one page and the user gives you there name. and on another page you have ...


0

In my opinion, you could use a concept like able/disabled. In other words, you could represent the requirements no longer required in a faded-out, "disabled" mode.


0

I think the best design solution to this is thinking of the use cases. A typical 'shopping cart' involves 'one order' with everything centering around the one order. In your use case, it doesn't make sense to have one overall shopping cart, so you need to group things in some manner. It sounds like the best way to group things would be based on location ...


0

Having run an almost excessive amount of user testing into the subject of forms (our app is very form-heavy), the conclusion was always that users cared far more about how much they could see on the screen as opposed to how long the form is. In any of the few variants, users that saw more on the screen were easily put off because they could see the amount of ...


0

Yes you can split the form and ask user to fill it which improves experience. 1) You may categorize the fields by which are mandatory and optional one. 2) we can use progress bar or navigation (step1 -> 2 ->3) for marking progress. The important thing here is usrr should able to go to prev screens form fields. 3) you may ask user to fill optional fields ...


-2

Users do not fill such long forms on mobile when they have to type stuff. My suggestions is to have minimum fields or have fields where users do not have to type much and select from given options.


3

I've had to handle a similar situation like this recently. You can try having each question on a single page and track the users progress with a fluid progress bar (dots will just highlight the length). For the dropdown, you can have a scrollable dropdown view, so the user can scroll that instead of the page without loosing focus.


0

I'm a bit confused at the words input and textarea, because if these are really input and textarea elements, they shouldn't have any ellipsis at all. I'll assume you mean just one line or several lines of text. In this case, your best option is to vertically expand the line of text (think on an accordion type of element). Thus, if you have this: I'm a ...


2

As you will already have the mobile number, go for the most restrictive questions first in order to prevent frustration and avoid a negative experience on the first contact with the company/brand/product. At the point of the 'not qualified' notification, then you could ask if they would like to be notified when they qualify. This would workaround data ...


1

If the goal is accuracy and reducing errors, then the second one (dynamic dropdown lists) is better. If the goal is speed, then the first one (let user type) is better. There is lots of articles online about dropdown lists not being ideal. The main reason is that it takes a (1) click (2) scroll down a long list (3) select. Most users can type pretty fast ...


0

You can have both or just one, it really depends directly on your use case: Input field usually works fine in any case if enough helping information is provided (field format, field name, helping text) Input field + range slider (after of below) is used when you want to give the user broad control over a pre-defined range of values with increments; For ...



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