Tag Info

New answers tagged

2

Maybe you should separate the target and the actual pointers to make it more clear? Sometimes (I for one) spend far too much time trying to do things too minimalistically - as in this case; get two values to show up on the same area instead of just separating them...


2

The problem here is the design itself Besides the problem you have encountered, this design is just plain confusing, and it requires a lot of effort to look at and figure out what the actual and target levels are, since they aren't always in the same place. Instead of displaying all five levels, only display two boxes, in two columns: the target value and ...


0

Look this tutorial for validation rules: http://wpftutorial.net/DataValidation.html The error message is inside the tooltip, but you can put the error message in a storyboard and animate it. Like showing up only, if an error occured. This is how inline validation is used at websites. Don't ask me how I did it. It's some years ago, but feasible. I think ...


1

Don't rely on the user; collect the information you want yourself. What you have presented here makes it clear that you know that the application crashed; you also know some state information about the conditions when the crash occurred (the open tabs). You should change your code to collect any other state information you are interested in. You surely ...


0

WPF has a great Validation framework. I find it to be intuitive with many options. And it conserves screen space. It uses borders and optional tool tips. Programming is not that easy but it is nice for programmers as it enforces rules at the data layer. The business / data layers does not have to care how enforcement of those rules bubble to the UI ...


1

The placement should be where the user is looking (the submit button and the form). The fact that something went wrong should be made VERY clear: the form changes color, etc... Re the wording - I'm assuming you're talking about non-techies who are asked to send PDFs (as for example) and send word docs or something else instead. The error msg itself should ...


2

I would recommend an "accordion" style form. Namely: Select a provider: [ Provider drop down v ] Or [ Add a new provider ]. When the user clicks the button (or the hyperlink, whatever you prefer), the form slides apart to reveal the new provider form. That information is submitted at the same time the main form is submitted, and you can handle the sequence ...


0

Since the domain is hotel reservations/booking, you will have to add more attractive elements to the page and they shouldn't take the user move away(of course). You can maintain a column where the form stays always or a fixed top band with a "Book Now" or "Reserve Now" option which can show the form. Now showing the form shouldn't distract the user. A few ...


0

If you are not already using row colours to provide information, perhaps you could use multiple shades of one colour to indicate freshness. The less fresh (riper? I concur with Jayfang, freshness seems a little counter-intuitive here) a question is the stronger/bolder the colour is to draw the user's attention to that question. Conversely, the fresher a ...


0

Consider changing the concept. "Freshness" is generally seen as a positive - how can something be "too fresh"? It's not a natural concept for most users. Consider an aged product like wine or cheese "too fresh" is not really used. Rather the concepts are "not ready", "not optimal", "cellar for a while", "ready at " If the system concepts better match ...


2

While (as @inkmarble mentioned) clicking may be more effort compared to a mouse-over we now also have to keep in mind the growing amount of users on touch-only devices. With the current state of the art, there simply is no way to mouse-over an icon on a touch device, thus making this help information inaccessible to this user group. Example: I recently got ...


1

I see two issues with your design. It is not accessible to color blind users. Once a questionairre has been completed, there is no way to tell if it was mandatory. I could imagine this being something people might want to know. However, the top design suffers from a lack of clarity. While * to indicate that a form field is mandatory is a well-known ...


1

Suggestion 1: Use the checkbox space? If I understand correctly, when items are fresh, they can't be checked & send to other users, so you will not need a checkbox on those, or have the checkbox greyed out? Can you not use that space then to indicate 'freshness'? A light, greyed out circle containing the item's 'freshnesh' in days (eg 24d) or weeks ...


0

In the JS Fiddle example you could try eliminating one level by replacing the top level with recurring icons on the right. For locations you could maybe use the abbreviation of a country or state (I don't know what your top level is). Since users can't select the top level (at least, I assume thet can't), you could make it more grey. However, it seems to me ...


0

Using indentation and fonts to separate hierarchy levels has its problems: Why should an italic text signify top level, and boldface signal subordination? If the intermediate levels are not selectable, you may also use space to separate levels: The first level is shown as Transportation --------- Car Aircraft --------- Clicking "Car", the next level is ...


0

I think this is a reasonable design if the number of items is not huge. The structure is clear, and it allows quick selection of an item. I have tweaked it a little bit to separate the top two levels more. If there is a large number of items, you should use a collapsing tree structure, so the user can narrow down the item they want without having to see ...


0

If you have a use case where a user already knows in advance whether or not the client already exists in advance you can also integrate the "Add new client" option inside the search dropdown. What is critical here is that the dropdown list should be shown immediately when the input field is focused, so that the "Add new client" option is visible without ...


0

I think a clear distinction between levels can come with such a structure. You can provide states, then locations and Alphabetize it. Also, you can use guides from @Izhaki What's good UX for selecting an item from a list of potentially 20k+ items?


0

I like MonkeyZeus starting message about freeing the slot for other people to use it. As of he countdown, IMO it's annoying for the users that will feel pressed and won't enter the best data they can. I like the ATM method, asking "Do you need more time?" after a TBD while. One advantage of this approach is that slow users have already experimented in in the ...


1

I would have the Create button, near the top of the page (perhaps in a fixed/sticky bar, so always visible) as you mention. Then if your design is a table of items which can each be read, updated or deleted. Have a column to the far right, with buttons for each action arranged horizontally. These could be simple text links, buttons or icons.


0

I am implementing something similar; this is my approach, and more a reply to @omcgo (http://ux.stackexchange.com/a/64134/39632) than to the original question. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups In this case, when the user first starts the login the Register section is hidden. If the user tries to log in, and the ...


0

The way I see it is that you are trying to solve two problems: Tell the user not to dilly-dally with the survey but don't distract them When appropriate, let them know they are running out of time Issue #1 possible solution At the start of the survey, simply have a message stating that "Please note that after 20 minutes of inactivity your session will ...


0

Showing the time remaining should and as well shouldn't affect the user. It must remind the user about the time and that it for which the input area where the user is writing can be highlighted with a mild red color to wake him/her up. As the color fades a small sandclock/digital time remaining can be indicated at the top. This can also be like the color ...


1

I think that: since for a "normally" working user (i.e. one that types in his/her answer without any major no-typing-breaks) there's no need to display anything (like you said, in this case, showing a non-counting counter would be just confusing) then, don't display anything only show the counter when a no-typing break duration has been reached. This ...


5

The state you describe appears to happen when a user is away from keyboard or no longer actually doing something. What would be appropriate is to put a gray overlay over the screen/survey with a messagebox in the center, modal dialog. This will show a kind of disabled state and allows you to put a timer and explanation in it. Something like "It appears ...


0

To make user more perceptive of how time might work use something much more understandable yet not tangible to give exact measure. This will give them an idea that time is not infinite, and yet they won't be scared by numbers.


0

You could map from a scale [0,1] to [0, Infinity), with the condition that the derivative at x=0 is 0, the derivative at x=1 is Infinity and that y=500 at x=0.5, say. For example, f(x) = 1000*x*tan(0.5*pi*x), which looks something like this: On this scale, you have the following values: 0 <-> 0 miles 0.1 <-> 16 miles 0.25 <-> 103 miles 0.5 ...


0

I think the expected behaviour really depends on the categories of option available & the language of the answers themselves could be enough to prompt the user on what to expect. For answers that fit in the same category, users would normally expect an OR search: What type of take-away would you like? Chinese Mexican Pizza Since all ...


0

I agree with dan1111. From a product standpoint you will also want to think about why you are using these services. For ex: Social products often will create their own authentication-—where they can add value by creating their own social graph.


0

Sometimes these odd UX choices don't come directly from the designer but rather from legal or another group within an organization. It's common to see these patterns when dealing with security & authentication.


0

You could always incorporate a snap-to-value slider at low resolutions. It's a lot easier to work than 7 small buttons. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


0

I've been replacing most radio buttons with button groups lately. I find dropdowns are just plain unintuitive on a touch screen. You said you have already done this, and I agree it is the best solution. Just give consideration for vertical flowing on small devices. If you still have trouble with people picking them, make them bigger, or consider ...


4

Instead of presenting the user with 7 radio buttons, I would suggest using a dropdown. A reference for mobile would be the Apple HIG - "Consider using a pop-up menu if you need to display more than five items."


1

It's simple: their design makes no sense. Entering something twice has a purpose when there is no recourse if you get it wrong the first time: If you type your password wrong when setting it, you won't be able to log in (and you can't see your password, so it's easy to make a mistake). If you enter your email address wrong, the organization has no way to ...


1

The "standard" look of radio selections is a well-understood design pattern The UI you have presented shows a pair of buttons. To the user, it can be unclear what the expected behavior of this control is. Buttons are usually used to change the view state, which is similar to the radio button behavior you intend. This visual appearance is also sometimes used ...


4

If you don't have a default, you probably shouldn't use radio buttons, or Bootstrap radio button groups. In fact, it's your choice of controller here that's creating the problem. One possible solution is simply to present the options as being visually distinct and use appropriate labeling to indicate that an answer is required and the options are mutually ...


0

It can be quite risky to put two forms on one page. I would strongly argue against this if the case is that you have two columns with forms and actions right next to each other. There exist some user research made in this area, where the conclusion is that multi-column forms should be avoided in most cases: The only deviation from this single-column ...


0

You may use a list, and when an item is selected the coresponding fields are displayed. Let the user change any field from any section. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups The print changes form, will only print the changes made e.g. if only favorite color is changed, print only that. download bmml source


1

Since your question is, specifically, Is there any evidence to suggest a user expects one behaviour over the other? I will answer that, and not say "do this one instead of the other", also because I can only speak for myself, and my perceptions. When I read the choices, I was on the fence. Does it mean "I want the thing(s) to have this, and this, and ...


0

I think some of the key questions that will allow you to come up with the optimal design will be: How will the user know if they are going to need to fill out each section? This will determine whether you are trying to get the user to go through the entire form or allow them to simply skim through each heading and go to the section that they want to fill ...


1

You should probably only have a search for AND. Generally, people have an idea of what they want, doodar1 and doodar3, and they want to make sure that they get it. Having a search for OR may be less useful. I think it's rare to want either thing1 or thing2, but not be particularly concerned if it doesn't actually have thing1 or thing2 - as long as the ...


1

I don't like repeating AND OR. What if one of those items actually began with one of the terms. I like the two headers Any, All Have also see And Or as the header If the user can specify Any, All then put that in a radio button Either above or below the question


0

Well, I think the solution here is quite straightforward: use both checkboxes and radio buttons. I think the functionality and difference between the two has been proved and vastly used throughout web design and user experience for many years without disappointment. I would absolutely use radio buttons for the first options array, the OR selection, and ...


2

The exact answer depends on your users (who are they and what services are the likely to be signed up for?) and your use case (you wouldn't want Facebook login on a business site, for example). If you want to research this, it is easy to find demographic information for social media sites. For example, take a look at this PewResearch report. Ultimately, ...


1

This image isn't the best example (I'll try to make a nicer one) but I think if you make each "radio button" in the list into a large selectable item... it should be easy to select and also to read all the details of what you are selecting... e.g. I would just make sure that (however you build it) that only 1 item is selectable and that it is visually ...


3

I like your general idea, but it seems that your users are not getting the metaphor. Which leaves you with two options: Make it very skueoumorphic, hoping that they will get the hint. Instead of using a slider, use something which looks like a physical lever that can be pushed more or less to the left (or right), and beside it a spinning number display ...


0

Based on the information given, your design seems like a very good one. Being able to perform actions without scrolling back to the top of the page is an obvious benefit. Functionality should not be dictated by what is easiest to develop. Within reason, development should be driven by design, not the other way around. And your proposed design is ...


3

I might be missing something (you might have been referring to this when you said "standard +/- values"), but this seems like the perfect use case for a spinner: The design of the spinner is such that "the appearance of the spinner at a given time does not represent the quantity of the associated value" (Wikipedia). Thus, you wouldn't run into the problem ...


2

Put a logarithmic scale on the slider. Larger values rarely need to be precise, so you can put a quite large upper limit on it. Take the largest conceivable value for this input, add 50%. In response to the system wanting volume rather than substance, I will restate what I said in the above paragraph. The question wants a scrubber/slider-style control, ...


1

I propose that you display (1) a position indicator (displaying a number of miles, for instance) and (2) a "speed knob" (a thumb on a slider). Let's suppose that the speed knob position goes from -1 to 1. Then when it's in position x, you increase, once per tick of some clock (e.g., once every 60th of a second) the position indicator by an amount ...



Top 50 recent answers are included