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2

For me it would make sense to split the flow in two. Have Add Tip and Ask Question flows. This way there may be fewer mistakes when users are filling in the form.


0

I believe it is better to break this into several steps when going for a mobile or responsive approach. People on the phone might not be able to fill the whole page in one go and giving them several steps might help on finalising the form. The reason being is that the forum is rather large and also keep in mind that every-time the user has to input ...


0

In my opinion, right side above of the table would be a better place, it looks good if it display in same size of the button and font size which is used for - Shift 1 button


-1

Something like this would inform the user that longer answers are welcome, but you would want to do a better job than I have done in the image below; formatting the link and the "optional" tag so that they are obviously related. As my example stands, some might think that the question is optional, which isn't good.


0

Showing many text areas for every single question could add too much friction. Showing many toggles is less friction but still more friction than not showing anything at all until required. I would suggest that you automatically show the comment text area only for the question currently being answered. Just make sure the place to comment doesn't demand ...


1

Break it up into multiple forms and present them to the user in several steps, see http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/apps/xaml/jj839734.aspx You can process the answers after every step on the server-side and show different questions in the following steps based on what the user entered.


-1

There might be a slightly hacky way of showing and hiding using CSS. However it might be better to split the inputs into multiple "pages" and deal with this via server side coding, then build an AJAX solution alongside or on top, that handles the paging without changing the page in the browser. The only thing to ensure with either solution is that it ...


0

When I've seen these in the past they have always been called Conditional Logic forms, e.g. http://www.gravityforms.com/features/conditional-logic/


1

In marketing lingo, it's called qualifying question or filter question. I doubt there's a proper technical term, it's more like two things mixed up: that it's a form and that it's reactive / dynamic / conditional. But if you need a catchy name, how about responsive form? In a web based solution, a form would be done in HTML (<form>, <input>, ...


2

Having built a few apps in a similar space many years ago, the underlying UI/app framework is unhelpful. Essentially what you have is both a "List UI" and "Item details" on the same screen. Two basic options: 1. Have two separate screens - List & Item Simplest to implement. Arguably could be less efficient. download bmml source – ...


2

Tabs usually contain different data. For example different sections of a form, like @staccato said. Now each tab is a new annex which the user add. When adding a lot of annexes it will be difficult to distinct different tabs. Instead of tabs you could have a list of annexes and a plus button below it. (For creating a new annex) You can have a list of ...


1

Current Password without a doubt. The typing clarification isn't necessary, and as general rule, if it doesn't make it better, discard it. Consider: That kind of form (password changing) is the same in almost every site. Also it's placed in the same section (edit profile, settings, etc). Inside a text input, specially a password input, to add the "Type ...


0

Funny, I always default the remember me checkbox to off, but I do it in defense of the site owner. My logic works like this... A user account gets accessed by another unauthorized user and real substantive damage is done to the owner of the account. This damage can take many forms, including theft of a credit balance on the site, the unauthorized sale of ...


0

The logic in the answers on this page are all correct, but there is something people are not considering which may change the answer depending on the type of product. 95% of the time you are accessing a website from a device you trust, so the odds are that this is what is best for the user even when it is best for the user, many users will forget to the ...


4

I don't think there is a different name for the form itself. The form is still a form - except that maybe it borders on becoming a survey! When you start creating the form you shouldn't need to decide whether you need a straight form or an 'adaptive form' - you should be able to decide at any point - and add or remove the logic at any time. You don't need ...


9

I use the term 'conditional input' to indicate that there are elements within the form that is conditional to the input provided by the user. I think appending the term 'conditional' in front of a UI element suggests that they are triggered by a particular condition. Remember that it is not necessarily the entire form that changes, but just specific ...


1

I understand that this is a data entry form for inserting and updating system entities into a database. Seems like a tool that people would need to work with on a daily basis and it's therefore imperative that the UI they use doesn't cause too much cognitive load, which results in unhappy users. The form you're presenting is over 20 fields long. I first ...


1

Decided to make UI much simpler and obvious, saved a lot of space in the process! :)


0

After each job is completed, you could have the system revert all settings to off, so that the user is forced to turn on the appropriate settings for the job at hand before they can proceed.


0

I wouldn't opt for any of presented options. Two latter fall out of question, because CTA is too far and detached from the action it submits. First option has a doubled CTA, and doubling essential controls confuses users. There is also no need to show "Next": users know when it comes to confirmation, it's a sequence, a wizard of a sort. You cannot jump ...


0

The first one is the best option: easy to reach and the colour makes it very easy to see where the 'save' options are. Option 2 is okay - but someone not as familiar with iOS may not see the button straight away as it isn't quite as obvious as the blocks of blue. Third one is a big no no for me - will take the user too long to find the button/if they can ...


0

I would NOT use two different contact forms. Hearing you talk about a "quick and easy" contact form accessible on every page in addition to the "full" (a.k.a not quick and easy) contact form makes me ask the question, Why wouldn't users always want the quick and easy option?


0

So here's what we are going to do. We are going to 'warn' the user about the similarity criteria in the following cases: There's a spelling mistake in any of the constituent words of the name and there exists a name already. Eg. Rajan Electricals and Rjaan Electricals. There's a word which has a short abbreviation in use, and the rest of the words match ...


1

Why not have 3 separate drop-areas? You seem to have horizontal real-estate to make it work. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups It would be a challenge to make the dialog balanced, as this heavy control at the bottom will draw a lot of attention. Possible solutions: Add more contrast at the top - brighter text, ...


0

The title of your dialogue is 'Join us today'. If I encounter this on the web, I'd certainly assume that I am on a Sign Up page, and the login button would take me to the Sign In page. The two intentions of joining and signing in to an existing account are very different. I'd suggest keeping the two separate.


0

The solution is to have an outer table with a single cell per row and then within that cell have a form which contains another table with only a single row where each row contains all your input and grayed fields along with both buttons. ...or you could do it with javascript where your buttons run clientside scripts to gather their associated fields and ...


1

You should experiment with various options and try which is the most intuitive to your users - you will likely need a Settings menu anyway so users will be able to choose 1st day of the week and so on... default status for the dates could be undecided, default action of 1 click could be to make the day available, 2nd click would toggle it to unavailable ...


3

Not an easy question. 1. You can't let people click 5 years' worth of days. That will take ages. 2. Off the top of my head, a nice way to lower the amount of clicking: Perface the date picker with some thing like this download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups This will at least ensure the user doesn't have to click ...


1

First of all: I understand you're under pressure and under some limitation. I will try to offer some improvements, but this is not the best solution, and might be problematic. Try to make the best of this by Monday, but try to get another timeframe for improvements. Suggestion: If you must view, edit and add on the same UI, tread carefully. You're ...


0

Start off with a calender, and keep it clean, using very minimal colors (white reccomended), and when the user wants to set availability, just let them click on the date, and bring up a split menu, with the right half showing a green button saying 'available', and the left being red and saying 'unavailable'. Good luck!


0

My rule(s) of thumb: if the option is boolean: checkbox if the number of options is 2 - 4: radios if the options have a lot of text: radios if there are lots of options: dropdown if there are LOTS of options: dropdown with search, like chosen


0

If the number of answer options is less than two, then we should avoid using dropdown button. This is because the survey participant has to click on the button to see the answer options and he/she might get annoyed if there are only two answer options. Instead, it's better to use a radio button if there are 3 or 4 answer options.


1

I think you're on to something. I would say that handling it server-side only and not alerting the user would be an acceptable way of handling it. However, some sort of feedback could be useful and personal as long as they don't feel penalized. One option is to tailor your submission response to be a generic catch-all. For example, it could just say "You're ...


0

It should be an information dialog. You're informing the user of something they didn't know. It is not an error. If you're a human and someone hands you a form with "W" in the "age" field, do you yell at them "Error! You gave me a bad age!", or do you politely ask "I don't understand what you wrote in the age field, can you tell me your age"? Bad input ...


0

I would consider displaying all items together, standardise and classify records according to their common attributes to create a basic record template and then attach what is particular to each group of category using icons or/ and descriptive labelling. when users want to edit a specific record they can filter and sort results to zoom in and open each ...


0

Have you looked into Miller Columns? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Miller_columns Might be a place to start looking at examples and getting inspiration. You can do some funky things with them.


0

I think option one is not really an option: making users switch between two languages while they are trying to come up with a good query is not such a good idea. It's better to present results in both languages at once, as you are suggesting in option two (and as Aprillion and other commenters agreed). I suggest two adjustments: not splitting the ...


0

I don’t think you understand the purpose of UTF-8 very well. It is just an encoding that allows you to store all kinds of characters. Choosing the encoding is more a technical decision and since you are creating a multi-lingual application and have the ability to choose UTF-8 it looks like the encoding you need. It is your application that decides what to ...


0

There are good answers, I wanna add: trial and error. Probably you don't know so much your users to arrive a good solution at once. And for sure, we don't know neither your users nor your website. So, you could implement several solutions and made statistics. First, use beta testers. Then, implement changes gradually (for a growing number of users). ...


1

You should never limit it, unless you have a very good reason. The users can sometimes innovate in unsuspected ways (it is said that tea bags where for test, and the consumers began to ask it in that way). Comments: A big NO, unless your system has some very strange use. You could wanna talk about a Greek person (say Socrates: Σωκράτης) in Spanish ...


1

Enforcing one language on an element within a multilingual experience might be confusing. If your users are using several languages on the app, then that should be respected. Otherwise it could be mysterious why all of a sudden everything appears in English, for example. However, to eliminate confusion on the auto-suggest element, you could simply allow ...


1

Don't ask the user a question if you don't have to. Same answer essentially as @Aprillion but explicit rendering can help user e.g. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups Will work OK with up to 3 languages - so default to English + users locale + (optionally) IP based locale


0

Since selecting a record to edit comes before actually editing the record, put the list at the top of the screen. Users tend to look for first steps near the top. Also, batch edits tend to confuse users. I've tried lots of times and never gotten satisfactory results. Better to keep the editing event small scale; a single record, not a session of editing ...


0

In my opinion, asking a user to sign even on a touch screen device is not a good experience. users cannot gauge the required space and will not be able to see part of their drawing as the fingers occlude the image. the only good way to make a proper signature is using a stylus. Having said that, I do not want you to drop the idea of getting a user's ...


2

Usually I would have thought the fallback for signing with a signature is to enter the name. With that in mind you could simply ask the user to confirm with signature or name, with the default being the signature. Entering the name would be almost as good as a signature in as much as it's getting the user to accept responsibility by putting their name to ...


0

I understand you want to encourage users to sign, and only use the checkbox as a technological fallback. If so, I like option #2 the best. Option #1 could work, but would require excellent copy. Option #3 seems a bit over-complicated, and you're also sort of "giving up" to the lower common denominator. This might get fewer signatures. I think your ...


1

Another option is to use the list view, but provide a add icon for each list entry so user doesnt have to tap on the menu btn. You can tap as many times to increment qty or disable add if only one unit can be added at a time. Have a search icon in toolbar (top or bottom) to search for an item. For new users and even generally i think "list of items" is ...


7

For a bilingual search, do not detect the language, just search both and return results from both searches. E.g. when typing "ma" in the autocomplete search box, you could get: maçã (apple) ácer (maple) For multilingual, it wouldn't work that well, but if the search in the chosen language returns 0 hits, you could use a whole-word search in all languages ...


0

System itself will get confused when user starts typing only few characters (e.g. Portuguese), You could delay the search keyword matching until a full word has been entered. That way you can match an appropriate item (in either language).


1

Currently you hide a huge content from users, but it's a critical point for your service. Using multi-language makes the case even worse. For Google it works, but they have strong back-end for doing this. I suggest explicit presentation of the content, using multi-level selection. So you build strong information architecture of your content, which has the ...



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