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0

An absolute and resounding Yes. Every time you remove friction from the flow, your user experience is enhanced. Thus, if your content requires the user to be signed and you facilitate that process, then you're doing things right. Think about how many people will leave your site because they don't want to follow a signup process, filling forms and such, and ...


0

If your website provide something like quick service and you don't need a lot of data from the end user just basic authorization then you can go with facebook,twitter or google signup, because mostly now a days people uses the internet in their own laptop or pc and have fb or twitter already logged in and moreover people hate create a new account for ever ...


1

If you ask for confirmation you make the user aware that login in in the site will create an account specific for that site (even if he is using facebook or gmail for the authentication); more important, in the confirmation (see your example image) the user is agreeing the privacy policy and terms of service at the confirmation.


3

It's usually separated, and on the right Reasons: It's separated because it's not part of the scale range. One of the benefits of the Likert Scale is its ability to visually lay out a gradient/range of values for a user (good-to-bad, mild-to-intense, etc). The "no answer" option is not part of this gradient, so it should be separated to preserve the ...


0

Should the banner appear at the top of the page and push content down? Or should it overlay content? I think this issue is more if you want to make your notification permanent or not, for example on sending an email, you just want to be notified that the email was successfully send or not and there is no reason to continue seeing the message after that ...


0

I completely agree to the other two answers (I upvoted them for that). Don't add more steps to the registration! You're probably asking "When should users invite other people, then?" Since you say this is a newspaper, I think there's a perfect point in time: Together with an article, you present the option to share the article with someone. The user may ...


0

Had a discussion recently when designing our notifications, deciding that 'The user is never wrong'. If the user is wrong it would run the user into a pain point which would be bad UX. So instead we provide the user with attention that something needs to be re-checked during input validation. In terms of execution this meant that there was never any bright ...


0

A registration form is something that you do only once and focusing by default on a field is not a common behaviour that users might be familiar with on mobile platforms, so I think it will bring more confusion than good experience. Additionally, it's recommended to give users the control. I understand that this is be a very simple form, but users won't ...


1

I would suggest that you allow the user to focus manually because, as you say, it will obscure the rest of the form. Users might find it jarring and they would likely prefer to know what they're about to start filling out :)


0

A reported 47% of signups can come from the home page, Sidebar area and exit popup while at the bottom of your content can be up to 73% effective. Here is my source. I believe your answers are there. Home Page 47% Pop-Ups 47% In Content 47% Main Navigation 47% Timed pop-up 13% Bottom 73% Sidebar 47% Exit Pop- Up 47% Content Upgrades ...


0

I don't think there's a single "best" way that fits all cases. As always it depends on the specifics of the site and users. That being said, what you are describing is a branching scenario, and for users who are not likely to do the task frequently and repeatedly, I prefer a multi step form, where the content of each screen depends on the previous selection. ...


0

Some suggestions to put to the test: Concentrate on the experience / task the user is trying to perform. For example they may only care about the total number of rows, the name, contacted status and maybe a snippet of a notes to start with. In which case make it look more like a list of simple clean data. A simple "more" button may be the best experience ...


0

Pagination is important when you have that many number of guests in your list. Currently you are feeling that it'd be a mismatch because of the way your UI is designed. I have worked on a similar requirement. We had to take many actions and edit a record on the fly. I'd recommend a view similar to grid with sorting and column filters on it. This way you ...


0

I think that in your case, a "Show All" link combined with a "display N results" setup would be the most appropriate solution for your problem, unless your research shows really huge lists occurs on a frequent basis. In that case, it could be a good idea to limit results in clusters, like 20 per page. Either way, there's some interesting insight by Nielsen ...


0

Pagination is "necessary" when there are multiple (and potentially conflicting) goals of a specific web page. So, for the CRM example, you might have a user page where the goal is to edit/update the user info. But you wouldn't have a password change option there because it has an additional "are you sure" and security requirement. You wouldn't have in-depth ...


2

Absolutely Not Login attempts lock after a few attempts (or they better, otherwise an attacker could break in trying the top 100 likely passwords), at least for a few minutes. Users would be very confused, I think, if registration screens locked after a few attempts, and by not logging them in, you give the attacker a clue that they password was wrong, so ...


0

Yes and no. You should let the user know that the email already has an account associated with. They should then be able to switch to login without retyping anything. The God Login Shows this well, Using just email and password fields while having multiple buttons for the different actions. Hiding the signup button on the login page, is also acceptable as ...


0

Possible Solution Given what you described, After validation is done the user will try to gather missing data but in some situations indicate that it is ok to process without that data (override), and assuming the users are insurance agents rather than lay-people, I would recommend the following process: user enters data from paper into computer program. ...


1

No, because you just doubled the attack surface. Request the user enter an identifier. Atomically check if the identifier already has credentials. If so, offer three choices: Go to login form Go to forgotten credentials form Resubmit a new identifier Same effect as you proposed, but the login barrier remains in exactly one place. Being in one place, ...


1

Option A is more common. Mass-edit is a very common scenario in complex systems and the process is usually to first select the entities to edit, and then to perform the edit, which is applied to all. Option A also provides more visual affordance. Often a table that supports mass edit will have a column of checkboxes, suggesting that more than one entity ...


1

I don't know if my approach fits in your use case, but here what we have been doing for a similar requirement. We have templates for forms. So when a user opens a new inspection, we would present a blank form, she may choose to fill everything manually. Or we have an optional feature which allows her to choose previously saved templates. So for one ...


39

Yes, log the user in There are several ways an existing user might end up on a sign-up page: User clicks sign up by mistake User recently signed up for an account and the browser URL autocomplete takes user back to that URL (most recent) User forgot they signed up previously and is attempting to sign up again (and, like many users, ill-advisedly uses the ...


2

I would say no, do not login eventhough all the credentials are identical. Eventhough it would seem logical to login because all the credentials are identical, it will as mentioned above cause confusion. I would just say give them a notification about the username/email is already in use. If you want to login the user, I'd say work with cookies?


28

I disagree with the other answers, and say yes, it may make sense (with a couple of caveats). There is an increasing prevalence of the combined login/sign up form pattern on some sites, where the whole sign up form is simply email address and password, and all more substantive profile questions become an optional step after registration. This pattern ...


33

NO. There are chances that user might have no idea about their registration status on the site. And start a fresh registration. In such a case, best solution would be to OFFER a way to login by inline validation. Before the user reaches the password field, the validation should suggest ways to login as the email is present in database. But, since its not ...


51

So basically you want someone who signs up for a new account and enters already existing credentials, to log in as the owner of these credentials? I wouldn't recommend this: The chance that the person signing up is not the owner of the existing account may be small, it is still possible. The difference between signing up and logging in should be clear. A ...


5

I would not recommend that. Signing up screen should inform visitor that a certain email is already registered. When you inform the user about that, he/she takes a step back to remember when and what he/she did that. This helps him/her get into context about the last visit to this site. Your website should comply to user's mental model. I do not think every ...


1

No. Irrespective of the fact that you may want to use something other than the e-mail address to uniquely identify a user (such as a separate user ID), no 2 different users can have the same e-mail address. Period. If a user registers with an e-mail address that is already known by you, you may want to direct him/her to the "forgot password" ...


0

Two modes can be given to the user: Basic and Advanced. Basic mode will cover only All/Any option to join all filters. In Advanced mode, the user can write a complicated query using brackets. Otherwise, putting all options in the given UI will make it a bit complicated, and maybe only few users want to use this Advanced feature.


0

Lots of good answers here. I am adding one more. If you are familiar with Microsoft TFS web interface. This is how they currently offer AND/OR based filtering. This also has sub criteria. This only allows one level of cascading. There is a valid reason for that too. Adding more number of levels is overwhelming for the processing logic yielding marginally ...


0

My company researched and tested various query representations for more than a decade now, and the one that works best with our users is a funnel-like representation, where OR conditions are laid out horizontally and AND conditions vertically. The AND conditions work like filters in a query in that they make the results set smaller, so we present them that ...


1

In my opinion the presentation of information and the interaction design needs to be based on the data as well as the user context, so unless you are able to somehow find research that fits exactly with your use case I would be weary about drawing conclusions from it. To guide you in the thinking process, perhaps consider it from a couple of different ...


1

User should always know what he is doing or what information needs to be entered Always use Descriptive labels like Enter Your name Enter a valid email and never use Submit on a form button, it must be descriptive too Here are few JQuery and JS plugins for Floating Labels http://clubdesign.github.io/floatlabels.js/ ...


1

If somebody writes 40% it's clear that it is a perecentage, and not an absolute value. Why not use that? If the last character in the input field is an '%' you can store the value as percentage, otherwise as an absolute value. Next to the input field you could show an hint like 'enter absolute or perecentage value'.


0

Use "Save as Draft" and implement autosave. Nothing worse than spending the time to work through a long form and failing.


2

A Draft is an initial or unfinished copy of a document which is expected to have errors and need reworking. I have used this term several times in scenarios like the one you describe to indicate to the user that their work is not finished. A different color can indicate to the user that this button is distinct from the main 'Save' button, and a tooltip or ...


27

@Mayo has, I think, the answer with the clearest affordance. But, if the discount field is going to be used frequently, an approach that has been proven to work with many professional and productivity application is the polymorphic input box. Applications like Microsoft Word, PowerPoint, Photoshop, AutoCAD, Illustrator, and others use these boxes ...


5

The answers so far all focus on ease of understanding. This is important, but if the tool will be frequently used, ease of use is also something to consider. If the typical user is likely to use this feature many times, I would let the option be set by typing % or a currency symbol directly in the field along with the value. This will allow an expert to ...


6

I recommend Gustav's option #2. You can give both, allow both to be editable, and have the counterpart update to reflect the change, either as they type, or upon the input field losing focus. This would also take care of the need to round. I could type 20% for the discount, and then tab to the absolute input field and round to the nearest dollar. In cases ...


18

You could use a toggle switch ABSOLUTE | PERCENTAGE and have the user select which one he wants to use. For example: (don't mind the $ sign I did it quickly) and let the user select between the two options. This format works very well in use cases that I deal with. Buyers and bidders have to make numerous (100+) decisions in a day. It's easy to select ...


3

I see 3 options: 1: The switch. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups Use common symbols like $ | % 2: Show both. 32.43 (0.64%) 3: Take over responsibility. And decide what's the best for your users. Ask what they want to see, why they want to see it. Marketing purposes: go for the one which suits better ...


2

Is it only me or that the textual option you used is better than any of the graphical suggestions above? In my opinion, this is too complex to be solved solely by some sophisticated graphical arrangement. Now, in this point you have to ask yourself, who is your target user? I guess this is meant for some professional/experienced user, not for a novice one. ...


0

If your criteria are mostly simple then a Query By Example (QBE) approach may be sufficient, and simpler for User to learn, construct and debug, especially those users familiar with spreadsheets. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups QBE can scale to more complex terms.


-1

Have you considered something like a report generation rules wizard similar to outlook inbox rules wizard? The reason I'm suggesting this is: most users may be familiar with this kind of design which would improve user experience the user can change parameters and keep it simple or as complex as they want I agree with @gustav test with users


0

The solution is in the interface. Don't make users interpret a tree of inputs. The interface should help the user understand their task. Let the users focus on the filter they are creating. Use form fields, selectors, etc. only as inputs, not to display any information, and remove them once their function is complete. By breaking the statement into ...


1

In case of non-techsavvy users, this might be a good way: Whats about making your search criteria like common language. All links are changeable with a dropdown list or similar. Inputfields for numbers or text.


0

You can choose for fields and take values for each fields instead of fixing the field sequence.


5

I like Googles vision on this. The user should always know what the input field means, even when a user is focussed on an input field (and the placeholder disappears). Take a look at the material design guidlines: http://www.google.com/design/spec/components/text-fields.html#text-fields-multi-line-text-field I also like this tutorial about floating labels: ...


0

Also, it's not necessary to have one submit button for a form, though it is a norm, you can have different submit buttons that do different things, and in that case enter without the buttons wouldn't be very clear on what the intention is download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


6

Users First you need to know who are the users and if this approach fits their needs and skills. For most business users and/or logic is hard to understand and should be avoided. Technicians or clerks in finance, accounting, ... are used to such a logic. UI Depending on the requirements several implementations are conceivable: Simple filter: Implicit ...



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