New answers tagged

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When I design questionnaires for mobile, I preload all the questions and display one at a time. That way there's no need for scrolling and each question can be large and clearly laid out, but users also don't have to sit through painful page loads. You can do this quite easily with jQuery Mobile's data-role="page" attribute. To prevent data loss in case the ...


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If it were me, I'd set your persons schedule to maybe start at the start of every hour (or however you'd like to do so) So have a drop down (or radio set) that has: 10-10:45 11-11:45 12-12:45 Then maybe a dropdown for recurrence: Weekly Bi-Weekly Monthly


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Q1 - it depends: A) are you more interested in ensuring the user picks the most appropriate option without any type of influention? Hide all dependent fields. B) by the form usage you clearly understand that the majority of users will pick one popular option, mostly without exploring the remaining options? R: present that popular option selected. Q2 - the ...


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As far as I can tell you just want a mini version of Apple's country chooser. I suggest having an expanding box that shows the available languages between those that have translations and those that don't:


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I've seen something along these lines when buying an iPad Pro. The initial colour option changes the image on the left hand side and collapses the selection showing you what you've selected. Step 1: Step 2 (after clicking on colour): Step 3 (after selecting Storage):


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I think this needs work on making it more obvious on what you should do, but I think this is probably about as efficient as you'll get in terms of clicks. It also should be quicker for the shop keeper to make updates. It's based on how I envisage a shop keeper might write down his time table: M,T,W,F: 8:30 - 18 T: 8 - 12, 13 - 20 S: 10 - 16 S: Closed ...


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Here is my solution to collect working times:


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Even though this is an older post, the core issue remains. ChrisF makes a valid point--core functionality of the Web browser shouldn't be disabled unless absolutely necessary. Also, adding text instructions may often be overlooked/ignored by users. A good possible solution is to incorporate some JavaScript that will alert the user if they attempt to use ...


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Like JDanniel Pacheco, i think the best solution would be to group the possible options. But I would go for something like this: Additionally, you can let the user maybe enter the filter themselves like:


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maybe you can group your items and you filters like:


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You could indicate lines separately. Also, you could try showing a visual marker for lines to indicate there are only 10 lines of space. Here is a quick sketch -


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Symbols on the buttons warn of mutable state Some clickable things in web pages and applications, like hyperlinks, are immutable. Meaning: you can undo clicking a link (back button) clicking the link again has the same result (go to same page again) By contrast, certain other clickable things mutate persistent state somewhere (often in a database). ...


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Here is a jsfiddle fiddle link https://jsfiddle.net/Simplybj/2w6c71bt/ i have created three prototype. just informing the user that spaces are also counted as the length of the user's input. 2nd one is the prototype which describes the spaces left by user as dotted part which is not as good i think. the third one is forcing the user not to use more then ...


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No don't add another label with 1/10 - this has no precedent and is confusing. The best solution is to remove the line limit - it's only going to confuse and/or frustrate people. If you are concerned about someone inputting too many newlines, then simply limit the output to only display the first 10 lines, followed by an option to view 'more...'. If you ...


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Both patterns are in use across a wide variety of applications, so there's no definitive answer. Most operating system menus have settled on graying out invalid options, so absent any other consideration you might want to follow their lead. Consider your users. Are they employees (aka a captive audience?) They may be trained and adapt more rapidly to hiding ...


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How about something where admins can click/drag the hours for each day. You could provide extra feedback of the actual hours selected during this action.


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The convention on iOS seems to be that if a field is editable, it'll have a disclosure arrow ( > ), and tapping that field slides in a new view where you can enter a new value or select from a list of options (for example, see Settings > General > About). You've already used a disclosure arrow in the Guests section, so I'd suggest just being consistent and ...


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I think you need a clear indication that location is the same, but let user change it: I would leave them with no option to rollback to "Same as Pickup" because it makes layout less crowded, but if you notice that this option is valuable you may add a link to "undo" or "cancel".


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Here's a quick sketch of something you can try: You can add multiple websites and hierarchies and make the location field specific to that combination of website and hierarchy. You can also individually close each field. I think it's important let users toggle between multiple combinations that you have, which could also be done easily in this ...


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i would recommend using the parent dropdown as a way of adding new child entries. Then have a delete button for each child element (kind of like how you have it). Remove ALL borders of the child elements and the "Add another ***" buttons. Add some basic animation to the child entries when they appear, for some light flair. DO you have any live examples ...


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If you like graphical solutions you may try something like this: Clicking in the stripe below the edit field helps to select the hours without typing them. User may also click and drag, if they like.


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Have the user agree separately to each term and condition you specifically want them to be aware of: Label1 [Textbox] Label2 [Textbox] Terms and Conditions [Textarea] [] I will not upload any copyrighted material to this service [] I promise to be respectful to other users [] I am aware that all my usage data will be sold to the Russian mafia [Submit] By ...


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Unfortunately there is no way to force the long-winded to speak more concisely; a hard character limit is a band-aid approach that often just results in the user filing multiple partial reports your support staff will need to piece together to make sense of. By all means you can encourage it by using smaller input fields, but a hard limit will just annoy ...


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It's important that each pairing of selects has a parent label to bind them. A side benefit of this is it provides you a full line width – it could actually wrap to multiple lines and still work property – in which to explain the purpose of each grouping.


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It's helpful that you grouped optional information together and avoided the annoying red asterisks. However, why repeat "(optional)" for each select? Group them as optional under a single headline after required fields, thus reducing cognitive load and length for the long labels.


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Assuming lengthy support requests are a true problem for the support team, limiting characters may not solve the problem. Your user will only discover the character limit when they intended to write more. That only leads to anger and discontentment. Find out what kind of information your support team wants in each request, and use chunking to extract that ...


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There is no reason to add a field into a form if you dont really need that information. In e-commerce the average abandonment rate is near at 70% (contact form could have some analogies). In each guidelines for form designing, one of the main suggestions is ever to make the form as simply as possible, avoiding all unnecessary requests.


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In 2010, the Post Office stopped the requirement for including County in a postal address so it is indeed not necessary to keep it for the purposes of 'a complete address'. Currently on the Post Office help system, the answer to the question Should I use a county name in my address? is: When you address your mail, you don’t need to include a county name ...


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I'm not sure when this section was added, but currently, the specs do have a short section about required fields: To indicate that a field is required, display an asterisk (*) next to the field. At the bottom of the form, include a note explaining that an asterisk indicates a required field.


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I don't think a reasonable character limit would frustrate the user. The tricky part would be to figure out what is reasonable. In my opinion, something in the range of 600 characters (3-4 paragraphs) should be enough to describe most tech-related issues. Try it, and if you find that it negatively impacts the user, or the quality of feedback that is ...


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I would suggest you use some sort of "filter" that allows users to choose a topic from a list of common customer support requests/issues you have, this would help with having tickets that are more straight to the point and would allow you to implement a character limit. In addition to this, you should include an "other" option that would eliminate the ...


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This is unfortunately a "it depends" question. A good request ticket should contain sufficient details for the customer support staff to diagnose the issue. How much info is required depends on what you're trying to troubleshoot. Another thing to consider is that a longer description does not necessarily make it's more helpful if it's filled with irrelevant ...


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A common way to handle this is by adding the selected country to a list of search filters, and then allowing the filters that have already been added to be deleted. Here is a rather crude example: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups After selecting a country, the drop-down is replaced with a deletable tag: ...


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Personally, id go with "Any Country" simply because it implies that no filter would be applied to the selection. As far as the other choices, I agree that "No country", "...", and blank can sound unclear. Have you considered "None" or "Other".


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Since this select is a filter how about "No Filter"?


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Option 2 is the clear choice. The field labels need to read as labels and not data right from the start. In options 1 and 3, before a selection is made, the labels are indistinguishable from data. Additionally, it is important that the labels remain persistent in style and location to avoid confusion, unnecessary learning, and a sense of instability. Once ...


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For excellent form UX and Ui, take a look at Typeform. We do our own forms internally and we view Typeform as the gold standard. That said, both work. I'd argue that the tagging-look is better because there's a clearer distinction between what is and isn't selected. Checkboxes are also harder to click, and spending the time to build it so selecting the ...


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You might want to do a search on the topic "Style guide" or "Living style guide". There are a couple of frontend frameworks out there that you can use to achieve the same UI consistent look and get you started quickly. Bootstrap and Foundation are some of the more widely used frameworks. They are all customisable as well. In my opinion using tables to ...


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Concern with the 1st and 3rd option is 1) Once you have selected an option (or entered the text in a field) there is no label to indicate what this field is about. 2) Since there is no label with the input field, you loose the opportunity to show any validation about the field (such as mandatory indicator *, etc.) So out of the three options you have ...


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Yes its a good idea to right align them. The reasons being:- Its an established accounting practice that all numeric values should be right aligned, for simple reasons as better readability and less room for human error - so its best to follow them If there are decimals then its more easy to read if they are right aligned My right aligning them it will ...


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It is good UX for the values to be aligned in the way that works best, and you need to take into consideration a number of factors (some of which I have listed here): Basic of numerical value (integers or decimals) Data type of numerical value and conventions (e.g. $, date, time) Alignment with the rest of the fields Length of the numerical value Behaviour ...


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From a UX perspective: I see two solutions. One: A regex that checks for something like https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=images and prompts them with useful information like "This looks like a link to a search result image, try copying the image address, and not the link address" This way you can get the URL with a ...


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I agree with the octern that it depends on whether choosing a future date is helpful or not... An example of how this is done today is how Google Analytics shows their date picker. Since there is no valid state for a report of the future they gray out the content:


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For editing values in a text field, it depends where you edit them, and what other fields are in its context: if the layout stays data-table-like, and the cell simply becomes editable, then I agree with @Erisu's answer, to conform to excel-like solution. if the text field is in a form, it is better to be consistent across fields, to prevent user having to ...


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Managing Readability As you rightly pointed out, the alignment rule works best when the data is in a list/tabular format. Basically when the user will have to scan related vertically. It is the context around the data that defines the alignment. If the context remains the same then do retain the same alignment. If it is a mixed data, like a form, ...


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If I understood you correctly , This is so called Data Justification. You need to justify the data according to its content. There two types of content numeric data and textual data. For Textual Data it is a good UX that you do left justification , For Numeric Data , it is a good UX that you do right justification. In this case data comparisons will be ...


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No, for two main reasons 1) Difficult to update - It becomes extremely painful to update the field on a mobile device (it is not a piece of cake on desktops either, though more manageable ) since then your fingers will have to tap towards the end of the textbox right-border, which is certainly painful thing to do every time. 2) Misaligned form - If your ...


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Looking at Excel as an example, when a cell becomes a numeric value, the numbers are right aligned. When double clicking into the cell to edit, they maintain the content right aligned. As people are accustom to Excel, it might be sound to follow the same flow?



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