Tag Info

New answers tagged

-1

The best (only) solution that I tend to arrive at eventually whenever I have this problem is to add a third component of some kind to the form. The otherwise awkward gap is then filled in and the form no longer feels like it's wasting space.


0

From your options, a popup that includes the entire form is my vote. If you want people to complete the form, the number of fields should be as low as possible. The best example of this is a single email address field and a submit button (with more friendly words than "submit"). Secondly, the more pre-fill you can do, the better, right? If you have two (or ...


0

Make your content interesting Not every user is going to want to immediately convert on arrival to your site. Make your content interesting, relevant to the terms that brought them there and tightly coupled to the goal achieved by completing the form. It's reasonable to assume that someone who has searched for something, found a well written, interesting ...


3

By auto-selecting if there's just one option you make things significantly easier for your user. Consider the comparison (which focus on one selection): No Pre-selection, text box User clicks checkbox Moves across to text box Enters some value Validation passes / fails Form is submitted No Pre-selection, dropdown User clicks checkbox Moves across to ...


2

There are expectations at play — users have an idea of the form and would want to see button there, otherwise the whole component would seem incomplete/broken. Disabled button implies visually that user has to complete the form (correctly) before it can be submitted. By hiding the button, you are hinting that there is no such condition. As users know from ...


3

Hiding the submit button is not part of progressive disclosure. The only case where a submit button is not available upfront is probably within a Staged disclosure where there are a number of interdependent steps displayed in a wizard or similar pattern and submission taking place as part of the last task in the process: see below for distinction between ...


3

In most cases this is not a good idea. It comes down to UX goals: The main goal of a credit card form is usually to get the user to complete a purchase. Error correction and validation is only useful if it helps you accomplish that goal. The Buy it now, Purchase it, or Complete purchase buttons are usually excellent opportunities to display a clear ...


2

According to me and based on the mistakes i have made in the past, putting any kind of condition for the user is not a good idea. Instead of showing countdown, you could tell them more about advantages of opening an account with your service. They should find value in opening an account at first place. People would die to open an account only if you are ...


0

From a programmer's point of view, login processes are mostly still POST forms. If you handle both the login form and the login process in the same page (say index.php), any future reload of the page (e.g. via F5) would also trigger sending the POST data again, which is not desired. Hence it is considered best practice to outsource the login logic to ...


0

I think a very similar challenge has linkedin when you are editing your profile. It gives you some visual representation of how much you have completed in your profile. To motivate you for more input, it constantly puts a prominent text box at the top of the screen, one by one, to ask for more input. For your case it does not perfectly fit due to the lack ...


2

It'll be hard to suggest how to consolidate two interfaces without seeing them first. Your question is a bit more of action consolidation - to which the answer is yes, this is possible: You can provide a two column view, one for users one for groups, multi-select list in each, and allow drag & drop between them, both ways. Something similar to this ...


1

The user story here would be: As a user, I'd like to easily locate to the next field where my action is required. Now there are many ways to satisfy this, but also quite a few assumptions being made. Visual inspection anyone? One of them, is simply by visual inspection. If you know a bit about visual cognition, you can design the interface in such ...


2

This is a well known design pattern. You have a form which contains sub-workflows, which can be fired off at different times in different orders. Problems: Legends (asterisks in your case) should be avoided if possible, because it forces the user to dart around the screen to figure out which controls are asterisked. Having the action buttons in a ...


4

Usually the primary active element (in this case a 'Submit' verb button) affords the user a clue about what to do. A disabled button is encoded with two dimensions: what do do and that you cannot do it yet. While this might also be confusing it does not leave as much to mystery. It also might not appear as a mistake. The big question to ask is: Why? I do ...


1

Color-coding the data entry boxes will give additional affordance. Are there other visual representations of the two actions (A and B) that might be represented with an icon or symbol? Can you logically group the required fields for each action?


2

There are simply too many rules to validate a phone number input by a user. 1. Phone numbers are ultimately just a string of numeric digits Here is one example showing how to convert anything a user inputs as a list of numeric digits. You would want to use the raw input from the user everywhere in the UI and then also store the converted string of ...


0

Beside adding dashes, you will need to deal with the position of the cursor, especially in case of deletion. This AMD module does exactly that: https://github.com/whenyoubelieve2014/us-telephone-input


1

Personally, I prefer the method used in the Google Chrome settings pages of Apple's control panels: Each time any control is changed, switch is toggled, field completed, etc the new state is stored automatically as soon as the state for that particular input is changed. However, when I am wary of the changes I am making (if it's something difficult, ...


0

I do agree with the pros of Top-aligned labes and other types of labels. However, my question is - is it rather imperative to have the type of labeling be consistent across the whole application, i.e. for the whole Internet Banking application or the best practice is rather use all types of alignment given the different types of forms?


1

I do agree with the pros & cons of Top-aligned labes, however, the last conclusion that Top-aligned labels are only ideal for Simple forms sounds strange to me. Should not the type of labeling be consistent across the whole application, i.e. for the whole Internet Banking application that has both simple and complex forms?


1

I'm not personally a fan of using icons in form fields, but I think it should be pointed out that they are not always just a purely stylistic choice. One of the reasons icons are increasingly used for email/password forms in particular is: browsers and plugins (like Lastpass) are increasingly insistent on autofilling these fields. And autofill behavior is ...


1

I believe it's important to maintain a design language throughout your site/app. If you use icons on one form but not on another, it may tend to confuse your users, and sometimes even mislead them into believing they're on the wrong page. I personally would get around this problem of similar fields that don't have uniquely identifying icons themselves, by ...


1

I will keep this short and to the point as most answers are already covering a lot of valid and good areas. Does it add value? I am not able to think of a case where the user will/should look at the continue button to know whether he has finished filling in a form. Whenever a user wishes to click the button he believes he has finished the form and ...


-2

ONLY disable the button if required data is missing or is not entered in a valid way - but still, even if you choose to do that, make sure you easily notify the user that some fields are correct.


1

The icons in the example are fairly recognizable. And as they are there along with text, I'd say they certainly aren't harming anything. However, some things to consider (both pros and cons): email/password are perhaps the most identifiable form pattern on the internet right now. Odds are the icons aren't improving the usability at all, as a ...


1

Icons are generally used in buttons for Web and mobile applications for actions. Like email icon for u want use this button to send an email. Using icons in text field like search is valid, however, I feel there are times it's ok to use icons in text field and this case I don't think so.


0

Passwords are a thing of the past. Users should just provide you with an e-mail. What do you need their names for? Then you send them a link and the link acts as their login. So when they click the link it takes them to a new project page. I think that is the best approach, as it will reduce your UI a lot, and users will check their email anyway. ...


0

To me it seems like there are two clear options: [ the ] bulk of the [ form ] [dropdown dropdown dropdown dropdown][submitbtn] or [ the [dropdown] bulk ...


8

Icons and labels If I was you I would not use icons for these specific fields, Words are (generally) unequivocal in there meaning (They obey conventions) while icons and the metaphores they represent are prone to multiple interpretations. Judging from your question, Having two icons that will look quite similar (Name & Surname being conceptually ...


1

One possible approach I can think of is a mix of the two approaches you have mentioned. While its best to keep the account creation simple and not make it look like multi-step process, we always strive to make things simpler for users. As per my understanding, once the user has created the account, they still cannot use the app since they need to ...


1

I believe there is a middle-ground. A visually disabled button doesn't have to mean that clicking it does "nothing" as suggested. It will logically prevent the user from advancing in the absence of whatever is required to enable that primary action, but there is no reason that clicking it could not present an alert message to the user explaining why it is ...


1

Why not look at it from another POV. Why do we need a checkbox "Keep me signed in" at the first place? It does nothing more than just toggle a setting right? Why not add 2 confirmation buttons? One with the text "Login and never ask again" and one with "Login and please nag me again next time" (maybe do something on the labels??) Clicking the first button ...


0

From a usability POV I definitely agree that there should be a remember me function within the logged in section of the web site. It seems logical that a user would decide they want remembering after they have seen a site is worthwhile rather than before they have ever logged in for the first time. From a security POV this idea falls down though; too easy ...


7

One should not disable the button Consider the situation from the user's perspective. Divide users into two groups Those that do not currently believe they can proceed, so are not looking for a way to continue Those who believe they are ready to proceed, and are looking for a way to do so. For the former group, disabling the "continue" button is merely ...


4

This is a meta answer drawing from the diverse opinions expressed. If you want to disable the button, you should still check for clicks and give reason why it is disabled. This has two advantages: fewer errors are displayed, and if you for some reason did not previously communicate why the form can not be submitted, you can explicitly do so.


2

Buttons are meant to be clicked. If user sees a button, he would want to click. Disabled button becoming active only when all the data is filled in that specific form is not a good experience. I would rather tell user ( which i do with the forms i design ) right at the beginning that all the fields are mandatory and you cannot sign up if any of these fields ...


1

A Form's 'Continue' button should be disabled until all required fields have been filled out and have passed validation. Why? Well it's common sense, really: Imagine you are a Bank. And you have a simple form setup which allows the transfer of monies from one party to another. You have a 'From which account would you like to transfer money?' field, a ...


2

On a login page, what is the order for most important fields for all the users? (Irrespective of whether they want to stay logged in or not) I think most of us would have it this way: Username/email Password Login button Keep me logged in option Now going by this order, it won't make a good UX (or even pratically possible) to have a 'Keep me logged in' ...


1

I'm going to give you the simple and correct answer : You NEVER disable a button unless it is performing a server-side, behind-the-scenes call, often referred to as AJAX, where you don't want that server-side action performed multiple times due to multiple clicks. It would also re-enable itself upon return providing you with the information needed to ...


0

You could limit the first type of entry (age for example should be a max 3 digits and maybe a dropdown) keeping a lot of space on the same line. Aside the answer you could have a single line entry field with "add comment" or "elaborate" already written inside it. (Think of Facebook's "what's on your mind".)


0

There are a few questions embedded in here: Why are opt-ins and T&C's not placed inline with form fields? Because it interrupts user flow, which can result in abandonment. Forms are already cognitively "complicated" to users....they have to navigate from field to field, think of an answer and input it. So a lot of effort goes into making forms "flow" ...


1

Yes the "Continue" button should be disabled until all required fields are filled out with at least some text (this assumes that the required fields are designated as such to the user in some way). The affordance here is that the system cannot even attempt to continue until it has the required input from the user. Once the required fields have been filled ...


10

we often see the 'continue' button inactive I think this may be false. Read on! For what it's worth, I'm updating some old research on sign up forms for popular websites at the moment, and have found that quite a small percentage - around 5% or less - disable the Submit button (whether that's the final sign up or a continue type button) until the data ...


52

Type of the information captured and number of fields required It really depends on the type and scope of the information you are asking for and the number of fields that need to be filled: I have tested and used this pattern sucessfuly in login and and password creation. I think because the interface is so simple and the number of fields required ...


0

There is a third option used on some systems where only the most recently typed character is visible for around half a second - as soon as the user adds another character or the time passes 0.5 seconds, the character turns into a bullet symbol - This is my personal favourite as it requires not intervention from the user to either activate or deactivate it.


17

I would have to say that this behavior hinders user experience. If you've ever read Don't Make Me Think by Steve Krug then you will quickly realize that this pattern is breaking the rule stated in the title. One might ask, Why is this disabled? There is no benefit to make a user jump through this hoop. Basically what I am implying is that the user is ...


1

Overall the idea shouldn't be a problem but the location of the feedback could be. Imagine if in the future you have this checkbox towards the very bottom of the visible page and the user doesn't know to look in the upper right for a confirmation. My advice would be to present the feedback as close to the action as possible. Something like this could ...


0

In my humble opinion as the comments go my first reaction to this winform is that this something of the past and I should get out of here as soon as possible. It's nearly scary! BUT if the app is targeting a forum of guys who are madly in love with the windows xp(erience) then knock yourself out! That being said let's move to your specific issue. You ...


1

Your best bet is to start collecting data. If you can observe actual users, great. If not, simulate this using hallway testing. Go to somebody in your office with a single monitor. See how they perform the task. Now try the same with people with multiple monitor setup. Do you see any difference in their workflow? How different is single vs dual monitors? ...


0

In that people expect old things to look old, and new things to look new, I suppose there is some validity to that. I have no data to back this up, but I strongly advocate the abolishment of tooltips--at least in the context of forms. For a few reasons: they're rarely consistently implemented and become usability hurdles they're often poorly coded and ...



Top 50 recent answers are included