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This question asks for an opinion, rather than an objective answer that can be "accepted". It seems to be a survey.


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You state that you must display the full name of (up to 4) tenants and the full address of the property. Must this information be displayed at all times, or only when the user is making their selection? If the full information that you described need only be displayed when the user is making a selection, then abbreviated information might be used in a list ...


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I gather you're using a select box because only 1 selection is valid? What about converting each option into a radio button? e.g. https://jsfiddle.net/mz9a22cd/


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I agree: drop down menus that are more than, say, five words wide are cumbersome. Users won't (perhaps can't) read all of the text, and so the extra information means they actually comprehend less. I would either a) find a unique subset of the information (the address?) and have that in the select box, or find another way to choose this (property ID, with a ...


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You could have a persistant panel (e.g. either across top, across bottom, to the right of the form) that contains the status of the current saved version compared to the form being edited: For example, the two statuses could be: If a save is required - [warning icon] Changes have been made, [SAVE button (enabled)] If up to date - [tick icon] Saved form is ...


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I think a proper solution here would be to display the save button inside a "floating bar" at the bottom of the screen. That bar is as wide as the page, and simply sticks/snaps to the bottom of the page.. it will scroll up/down along with any field that is in focus. Additionally, you could choose to only show this bar in case changes were made.


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Keep in mind that depending on the age of the students not all of them will have a mobile number, so you'll either need to allow a phone number (the parents) be used for more than one account or have email as a secondary option. I think the key point you're missing is that facebook lets the user choose if they prefer to use an email address or mobile number. ...


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Mobile numbers will go away within a couple of years. Email is ageless technology. The difference is that in most countries a mobile phone number should be linked to a personal ID (passport/security ID, etc.) In mobile-oriented site or app it could be mindful to auth by phone no., but a user could have no one. Linking to the mobile number, you hard-link ...


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I can't help feeling that if you can't answer this question yourself, then you don't know what you are going to use the data for even when you have it. Maybe if you think about what data you actually need it might help? Do a little role playing where you put yourself in a position where you actually need to make use of this information in different ...


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If you're only able to do one, I'd go with email. Mobile number is very personal to a lot of people; they are concerned about spam calls. Sure spam emails are a problem too, but they don't demand time in the same way as a phone call. Also Facebook is a well-known name - providing your phone number to them will be regarded as 'safer' than to a smaller, ...


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I assume you’re designing a public facing web site, where your target is to let new users register to be able to access content. And you want to decide whether to use Email or phone number when they register. If your goal is to get as many users as possible, my recommendation would be to use both. Some users like to register with their Email address and ...


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If the site is for developers or those who are familiar with command line, you can use one, but usually not so much people love the restricted feeling of a command line. You can use a form, and chunk it in category(e.g. Personal details, skills, experience, etc.) For pop-up form, I think is not great because is used as a dark pattern, and usually is not ...


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We recently used the single-field credit card input on a high profile donation campaign that raised 2.4 million in one month. You can check out the form here: https://freezemnd.com/donate/ The most difficult thing for us came after the client asked to add conditional logic to the form for some raffle tickets. This created some trouble with the javascript ...


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The following would be the approach that I take when designing a form (some more context about the use of this contact form would be greatly appreciated to help improve this answer). Though you say that there are 20 required fields for this contact form I'd firstly pose two questions: Is there any contextual information / pre-population that you can ...


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There are few ways to make long forms feel less lengthy group various fields together using things like spacing and visual separation (e.g. personal details, contact information,) Splitting the grouped fields into tabs or accordion so only one group can be seen at a time showing a progress bar or a step indicator to give the user an idea of their progress ...


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The UI you have presented is not consistent either. It has visual consistency. But the interaction is not consistent. When a user adds a form, it is added below the dropdown, but when a new field is added, it is done above it. This affects consistency as well. The user has to get used to one of this pattern (either adding above or below). Otherwise, it ...


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Consistency + heirarchy = mo betta There's nothing wrong with consistency among controls. I think the problem you're sensing is hierarchy. In your example, adding a field (the low-level item) is more prominent than added a form (the high-level item). The controls are identical, but the ground contrast is greater within the form edit module. With a few ...


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As @Peter has already said, most users will probably recognize the pattern regardless of what text it contains but you could always test out the theory by printing out a bunch of mockups with your text, his text and no text, and then just spend an afternoon in a coffee shop or shopping mall asking people to look at them at random and tell you where they'd ...


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The first question I would ask is why does he suggest using this? I find most fears about 'Users won't recognise ...' are unfounded: in both cases you have a form and a button; there is a good visual association between the two and it's just the wording that has changed, so users are likely to make the association. 'Sign in' has the benefit of being ...


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The ideal answer is "test both" and see which works better for your users. Without testing, if you have to make a choice, clarity always trumps consistency. Focusing on your specific answer, I would suggest a different UX pattern for adding fields to make it even more different than adding a form. For example, eliminating the dropdown completely, and ...


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You could use AJAX and have it switch the two, I would use links for switching instead of a button.


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At what point in the user flow does this form appear? If the call to action is to register, then yes, it is confusing to have both register and signing in as part of the same form. However, if the registration/log in happens as a secondary stage of a more important user flow, such as a checkout process, then a single form could work. I would agree with the ...


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I would go with option 2, but instead of calling the button "Next Tab" I would be more explicit- "Continue to section Foo to continue entering information about Bar" (and with text that long, consider a clickable hyperlink instead of a button). Likewise, the Previous Tab button could say "Return to section Foo to edit your information about Bar". As for ...


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This is just my personal opinion, but I hate it when I'm trying to shop and somebody is obviously trying to generate leads. I don't care to spend two minutes filling in a form to try to figure out what your product or service is. Give me an option to find out what you are selling and what advantages it offers to me before trying to get my contact ...


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Here is one approach favored by my End Users, have an underlined option stating 'Clear' when the field already has an icon within (calendar in my example). Having an X clear button within the edit field is good, but coloring it red might mean error after the User types in a text. The common theme across apps/web is to use a lighter grey/grey colored X ...


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This example tested well with all types of users It helps if you try it out yourself by clicking the above link but here are the two things that make the X more intuitive and discoverable as a clear button... Only show the X if there is something to clear Place the X inside the input instead of next to it


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You'll find fields with a little "clear" button in them all over the web. Like this:


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I would say it depends on the scope. For a single text field you could simply use an x such as the one provided by Font Awesome (here) If you are clearing all information from the form it'd be better to use a button that has a different color to the submission button. For instance if the submission button is the color green, a good differentiating color ...


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The problem must have different ways of solution, the appropriate solution must address user ease to do intended task with delightful experience. To select appropriate product or features RADIO buttons can be used. So basically it will decrease the form fields and only required form fields will appear to the user. STEP by STEP approach is always better in ...


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As everyone has already said, it's usually required only by the backend. And yes, your colleague was right, users WILL get confused and think that you are asking for two different addresses if you word the lines like this: "Address 1" "Address 2" A better way to word the fields is like this: "Address" "Apartment, Suite, Unit, Etc. (Optional)" This way ...


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Yes it depends on the context and who is using the form and how often. I've just come out of a series of tests with a system that has many forms. The old system preferred progressive disclosure where the questions were split into pages instead of being loaded on one page. It totally annoyed users "why do I have to keep clicking next, why can't they all be ...


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First, you should find out why CAPTCHAs are placed in websites. CAPTCHA is a way to filter the requests from suspicious visitors (robot). So the reason is about "security" itself. And then about UX concern, "Does it provide a good experience?" The answer is NO. It's very frustrating when I visit a register page at first time, I have to solve the CAPTCHA. ...


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No, you should not use CAPTCHA. You should focus on technical ways of solving your problems rather than shifting the technical burden onto your users. As a simple example, you are asking for an email address, so you could validate the email address (which you should do anyway) as a substitute for CAPTCHA. Someone could still write a script to generate ...


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Any user will never sign up if he does not know what is there in the website for him. In case you think your site is too complex that a user will not be able to identify the complete potential; you can use an optional tutorial after the user signs up.


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Working on something similar, it may be more complicated than it seems to add multiple fieldsets with an auto-append way I would like to hear your opinions about the following issues: In the initial state should the user see that it is possible to add multiple fieldsets? The new line added should appear just when the user starts to type in the first field ...


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The payment gateways we use (the largest in our country), don't send any address back at all, so if it's not being used to validate a credit card holders address, I don't see any point in asking a user to do enter it. However if it IS used for validation, the common "Billing address same as shipping address" checkbox should be used.


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Make verification a separate task Unless this is a high security application I would strongly advise you to completely separate out the validation portion of your sign-in process. Let people use the application without verifying their email or phone number for a limited time. Be sure to make it clear that they need to verify their email and/or phone ...


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I would also avoid the 10 second timer. The scenario of useful email re-sending is when an user has made a mistake and wants to correct his/her email, so you should not let him wait 10 sec. If you worry about spamming it's better to control sending emails from the same IP or email address, giving 'ordinary' users better UX.


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With the validate "page" this seems good to me, only thought would be to have a "Not the right e-mail address" link below the e-mail, so that they can correct their mistake, rather than needing to sign up again. Most sites and services now let people in without validating email/phone, however (some) then limit functionality until they validate, displaying a ...


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Speak the user’s language “Form” and “text editor” are UI terms. They vaguely describe what the controls are but not what they do. Step back from the problem and get into your user’s head. You’ve described one aspect that would drive the decision (document linking). Is that the only reason? If so, you need to find ...


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I have experienced a similar problem, in which the user was uploading documents of different types. I allowed the user some flexibility in how they accomplished the task. Allow the user to do a bulk upload to a specific type by having the various document types listed out. Each type is a row in a table, wide enough to be a reasonable drop target. So if the ...


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So, you want to be able to change the details for one or many files in one go - I would suggest a file view that lists all the files with a panel to one side that lists the details of the selected file or files as input boxes - the user could select a single file and edit its details in the side panel or they could select multiple files and edit their ...


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It's OK to use a popup here Assuming you need positive user affirmation of the legal disclaimer (ie it's important to you that the user directly clicks to affirm the legal content), a modal pop-up is not only fine but it has several benefits: The pop-up channels user focus onto the legal content (assuming you are masking or otherwise de-emphasizing the ...


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If users are going to be doing this frequently, then they will want to do it quickly and the same way each time. First, the input form should display the formatting, so that users only have to type in numbers, like so: ___.___.___.___/___ Second, I'd recommend that the user be able to configure their preferred method for entering the numbers, and the ...


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This is a great question. I don't think you need to make drastic changes to your UI since the behavior you are describing seems easy to learn if repeated a few times. I would just add a tiny help icon next to the field and when the user clicks or hovers it, display a small tooltip with the instructions.


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The model that springs to mind for me are the widgets used in graphics tools for defining gradients, particularly those that allow for multi-stop gradients. Take, for example, Pixelmator. You start by defining the start and end stops of the gradients - the first and last colour. You can then click the mouse anywhere over the body of the gradient to add a ...


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Use the terms "Login" and "Password", and add a hint to the login field stating it can be "username or email". If you for example check this german real estate site, they have one field for everything (location, city, zip, street, some id) with a hint explaining it: http://www.immobilienscout24.de/


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Because it's helpful to know the first name and the last name, rather than just the full name Why it can't be done automatically Without asking, a site cannot tell the difference between the following names: Why it matters Sites often want to be able to communicate with customers using different styles, where first and last names are more effective ...


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Use email Email provides a clearer prompt to the user around what the field is, and how to remember the value. A simple thought experiment illustrates this. Let's take a common situation: You visit a site which you haven't been to for a while. You are presented with one of these login forms: Common scenario: you don't remember your username or ...


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Each option has advantages, however I think email is much better. Username: generally shorter Email: harder to forget, users are used to entering their email



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