Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

Having a social signup/login isn't a bad idea and you should generally stick to what users are using, aka what is the likelihood of them having a Google+ account versus a LinkedIn account? You have to remember that having all these options doesn't automatically validate your idea to add them in the first place. Do you plan on measuring how many users ...


3

Firstly, I commend you for getting some genuine testing done on your design. Many products don't allow themselves this and suffer with a poor performing site as a result. However: ...Several users found the contact form section very big and loud and wanted me to get rid of the background I was using on it. After thinking about this for a while and ...


-2

Its actually very good idea to ask user friendly questions rather than just simple label. This will surely work, as long as you split it in two sections one with the form & other with the contact information. You can label the form with 'Let us contact you' or 'Let us know you' When it comes to background, its way too loud. But its not just the contact ...


1

As from your question and response to JonW's questions, if you are providing a trial version and want the user to signup just for the purpose of contacting them again I think the signup can be avoided there. If you have to make the user signup for something there should be something more that you should be able to provide the user (other than a download like ...


-1

As Imran Bughio writes, it should definitely be possible to signup using an email address. The current trend of forcing users to sign up using an account from one of the surveillance networks, is absoutely horrible and hopefully will stop soon. You could also place a contact form on your website and refere to this in the free trial. If the users think the ...


2

That is quite a loud background, but I think there's a problem with the contact form as well. I don't think it's impossible to open with a contact form, but it doesn't work here. I'd pinpont the following (potential) flaws: The site doesn't follow social norms. You don't ask questions before telling people something about yourself, and why they should ...


0

This is a question that can possibly related to Gestalt grouping. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Principles_of_grouping The box simply is a way, visually, to tie elements together. There are multiple ways of grouping elements but I think the most common we see is proximity and using elements to create visual containers. The same principles aren't just for ...


0

Don't completely rely on social network signups, Users should be able to signup using there email address. Facebook & Twitter are the most important Signup buttons due to the number of users these social networks cover. Add linkedin singup only if a great part of your targeted audience is Corporate or your product have to do something with business, ...


10

It can either be a matter of the context or simply a choice of visual style. If the form is displayed in the same context as other elements on the view (promotion message, login form, etc.) it can be a good idea to frame it in order to visually map it as a unity to the user and yield closure of completion. This is the case for eg. the Twitter sign up view: ...


0

Boxes help to group UI elements. When displayed on a page with many distractions from other elements it can be hard to see what element goes with what element. It can result in people not filling out the entire form. A box can also help to make the user feel more secure when filling in the form. It's proven that when having to enter sensitive data like your ...


6

Visually the box provides a grouping of the elements - Grouping the form fields, making them distinct from the rest of the content. Working on the gestalt principle of closure. That box is usually the fieldset element of the HTML. It's not clear from your example, but fieldsets usually go around related elements, so you could have multiple in a form. The ...


1

What I am about to suggest is merely what came to mind as a solution that I would use when I read your question, so clearly you may not find any related research or material to substantiate it. I am specifically addressing the question "When you have live form validation, where should an error (or success) message appear in relation to the form element?" ...


0

I think a lot of error messages these days make users anxious. User anxiety can cause users to abandon your form. You don't have to always use an alarming red and emphasize the user screwed up to get your message across. You can make your error messages more reassuring so that users will feel more comfortable completing your form. After all the goal is to ...


1

Re-entering data is always a pain for the user, so avoid forcing them to do so where possible. If you have 2 password fields (a 2nd for confirmation), you could reduce the pain by just blanking the 2nd confirmation field so they only have to retype it once. If it was data in a field which caused the error, it is nice to have the cursor on that field so the ...


1

I'm thinking about pre-filling the following for sure with the same values that were previously input by the user: First name, Last name, Email, Terms (checkbox). I think you are right to do that. But should I also do that for the New Password and Re-enter email fields? In the case of an error with the e-mail, I think that you should ...


1

I'd go this way: Post an update [Link] [Comment] [Movie] (Optional) – Gives an idea that other two are required, but not forcing to fill both of them [Submit] – Disabled until link or comment is filled Now I can't think of any error case, can you?


0

There may not be a universal rule that can be applied, since the reaction of a user to the text input size will relate to the task they wish to accomplish, and their expectations of the application / site. Usability testing with your target users is probably the only way to accurately guage their particular expectations.


3

User can enter his name later in his profile, if he wants to. The ultimate rule of any form is to be as simple (use as less fields) as possible. Users are lazy. Assuming you have proper labels above your fields (and that all of them are mandatory), it makes sense to highlight erroneous fields with red outline and display one "Please fill" message at the ...


1

Your error messages can be more polite and specific. You cannot have this message "Please enter your name." for both your conditions. If the user has entered a name and if you show him the above message then he will be confused. You need to tell him more specifically what is the error and what will be the correct input. Like "Your name cannot have illegal ...


0

Your error messages seems correct to me (however, I'm not a native english speaker). Edit : If you want to keep the e-mail confirmation, I would recommend you to say that the two e-mails doesn't match (with a better english than mine ;) ). It goes a little bit out of the scope of this post, but since you are concerned by your UX, here is an advice for you ...


0

I could not comment to the question since I am not reputable enough yet. It would make a difference if filling both fields creates additional value for you. Do you prefer the users to fill in both but you allow them to fill in only one or it is enough for you if you have one of the info.


1

Showing help text to the right may pose a few issues like For a long message text you may have to wrap the message several times. So it may appear like a block of text instead of a message. If the message text lengths keep varying based on the field in concern then these block sizes will keep changing invariably with the fields You may not be able to use ...


0

You could use some nice CSS trickery to show/darken the placeholder text when focused or on hover. You could fade the placeholder text to a light grey (to keep your form looking clean and light) then darken when focused or mouse over.


0

There is no good support for HTML forms in email clients, please check out this post http://www.flitehaus.com/blog/2011-06-20-can-i-include-form-email about the support for HTML forms.What you can do is send a link in the mail, which opens in the browser and contains the form.A quiz should be interactive, providing a Quiz in email client would not be ...


0

To be honest, I would go back to the client and tell them that a form within an email is not the right approach. If you explain why, and suggest a better approach they will often take your advice. Can the quiz can be in the browser and the email will drive people to the this? If you absolutely had to do something in an email, you would need to rethink how ...


2

First thing, you need to group your alternative fields together. It will be a hassle for a user to move around back to the first field if he doesn't want to fill the third field. You should not move the user up and down the form for filling the details. It should be a top down approach. So I would suggest you to group your link and comments fields together. ...


5

You can try use this pattern (for options already selected): It lets you keep this placeholder look while still not resigning from having labels displayed within the field. You can use other text color (like light gray or something) to degrade the significance of the label of course.


0

One thing you could consider is moving the placeholder text outside of the input. A perfect example, in my opinion, can be seen here: http://littlebigdetails.com/post/82478225432/circleci-once-activated-the-input-placeholders This way your input and placeholder text aren't "confliction" (couldn't think of a better word, sorry) and are actually becoming an ...


0

Quick answer Display labels on the left of the form controls if you have enough space. If not, hide the labels in a safe way (see below). Align the form button with the form controls. Accessibility point of view From an accessibility point of view, all form controls should have labels. That allows all users -- included those who use assistive ...


1

If I understand correctly, they have to enter the digits one by one from left to right. This is bad interaction design for the following reasons: It violates the principle of least surprise. Users see a text boxe, they expect it to behave like a textbox. The conventions may not be ideal, but you have to take them into account. There's a lot of work between ...


0

currency input is a pain because everyone has different locales and expectations. (This is actually true for any kind of input). A solution I like (my liking this is not a good base for any usability standard) is the following setup: Present 2 boxes with a decimal separator in between +---------+ +-------+ $ | 0 0 | | 0 0 | ...


0

If you want to enter 50$, you have to type "5000" or "50.00", etc. I think this question speaks for itself. There will no added value when you implement formatting behaviour like this and it can break users flow. The expected currency-formatted output of 50$ is basically when you type '50'. Let the users place the decimal separator where they want to ...


0

50 characters (of which 15-25, depending on layout, are visible in the form input field) for the family name should be plenty. It's what works well for me, anyway. For consistency, one should assign the same amount for the first name(s). I decided for the number 50 a decade or so ago because the longest realistic name I could come up with ad hoc was 15 ...


2

Given your three options, I haven't seen a strong case for removing the labels. The reasons you're giving are personal preferences: With the labels at the top of each select box, the form is too long and then I force users to scroll, and as I said, I don't want to. - Using placeholders without labels the form looks really great. Even in this case ...


13

You might consider showing a tooltip on hover like:


10

In your case I don't think there is an issue removing labels,Since you are using only select boxes in your form and there are no text fields, When users click on select box they are going to be presented with list of options so I don't think the issues of auto focus, lack of compatibility with browsers for placeholders plays an issue in your case.


2

In most cases I agree that it is the better option to minimize the number of steps or actions the user needs to go through. Accepting a ToS is a different thing in my opinion. Even though most people probably doesn't read the ToS anyway I would consider it too important to "hide" the action. Unless you make the text below the Sign Up button VERY visible I ...


3

From my point of view, the problem with using placeholders without labels is also relevant when using combo boxes and not only when using text fields. In both cases the "label" disappears when typing or selecting something. If the user is not familiar with your form and the order of the combo boxes, this could be confusing. I suggest that you use labels as ...


0

You could reference the names and look for existing entries after you unfocus the last name field, but the problem is if you have users with the same name. Working for a company running national registration-oriented promotion campaigns, this happens more often than I had ever realized. We cross referenced name and email address as well, but since your scale ...


1

With all these good suggestions, consider two factors: 1. Incentive What incentive is driving your user to complete the form? This is directly proportional to the number of fields you can get completed. If the incentive is low (i.e., trial of a new, untested product), have few fields (1-3). If the incentive is high (i.e., registering to attend a ...


24

In theory the correct answer is no upper limit for name lengths. Allow the user to enter whatever their name is using whatever characters are available to them so that you will never run into a circumstance where someone is prevented from entering their valid real name. In practice that is not possible to implement. There have to be limitations. These ...


5

Given the diversity of names, I wouldn't... set a floor or ceiling limit on name length, OR even break the name into two separate fields. Depending on the country / cultural background of a person, they may have a more Westernized [first-name] [surname] name, but they may not. Why possibly bar users from entering their complete name because of arbitrary ...


1

Based on the type of the application you may want to select an upper or lower limit for the names. The upper limit though a tricky approach the lower limit may be 1 char since the person may choose to write an initial instead of the complete name. If your system requires a name then obviously you wouldn't want the user to exit without entering a name at all. ...


0

Wheat ever you are doing is a right approach. This will be a guided approach. With some small improvements you can enhance the user interaction. A back button with previous page label I see a save button on every page and in the header, doesn't your use case require a save button? if required it should be placed in the page where user has taken a ...


1

For a very small amount of detail information, the standard way to display details would be to have a + beside "Interior", which when clicked slides down to display the extra details. For larger amounts of information you will probably want to have an arrow (pointing off screen to indicate another screen is available) beside "interior", which takes you to a ...


0

Making a well designed on- boarding wizard kind of flow (lots of forms up front with the option to skip) can be very useful not just in collecting info but in guiding a user through the app. If you ask me for my college alma mater, for instance, you're also showing me that alma mater is important to a good experience on the platform. It can double as an ...


0

How about showing user multiple small-ish forms in a series to fill out your big form, the little forms' questions should be in reasonable group. eg: personal info, contact details, etc... Let the user fills in the crucial information and give them option to skip other part to do later.


1

Targeting specifically to your "page full of text boxes", it is (as you have mentioned) very important that you avoid such a situation. Might I suggest another approach where there is just one text box that will be used to add the nodes, and the subsequent nodes are added as text links below it. You may observe the remove icon next to every node, which will ...


0

I've decided that my approach shall rely on two changes to the above scheme. First, the Add Row button will be moved inline with the text boxes. When there's only one text box, there will be only the Add Row button. When there's more than one, then the Delete buttons will be displayed. Observe: This tells the user that can always add another row, and ...


2

Is activation absolutely required before continuing the process? If not, you might try something like this: Checkout form is one page. At the top is two or three fields for registration: email address, password, maybe their name. Then below that is just their payment information. When they submit the form, it logs them in and takes them to their dashboard. ...



Top 50 recent answers are included