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0

I'd say the best thing to do would be something like this: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups You could also do a small arrow outside the text field, like it's done in the Windows 7 login screen. You probably would want to restyle the button... maybe making it blend into the textbox until you hover over it. The ...


0

My recommendation, and where I believe all data entry and interaction is headed is in the intelligent, dynamic presentation of fields based on context. Here is the simplest possible example... EXAMPLE A registration form, presents itself as quick and easy, with three fields (improving enagement) Then adds fields as the user completes the task. ...


0

Like many others have said, think about grouping. Also, principles of hierarchy come into play a lot with those groupings. Clear headings for information groups are key when you're asking for a lot of information on a form. I recently had a very data-heavy form that was part of a large, complex approval process that forces the completed form to move through ...


1

When your designing your form think of it as how am I going to get the user from A to B in the easiest and most pleasant way possible. I would consider breaking the form up into steps via javascript so the form does not look lengthy and daunting on the user. Try and keep them focused on the fields by moving any labels inline and the descriptions to the ...


-1

I'm not sure regarding the code your using but I think if you'll have a small guidelines tooltip that will state that says not to use special characters in the first and last name that will be a nice UX , though i dont know what the application your using .. and not sure how you will apply it there ..(this forum has a tooltip like that for the password type ...


5

Yes you should! Your suggestion about having a validation rule would be a very bad idea. Did you know, the world's most common last name is 王? Here is a classic article that you need to read: http://www.kalzumeus.com/2010/06/17/falsehoods-programmers-believe-about-names/ All of these assumptions are wrong: (...) People’s names are written in ...


0

Wrapping checkbox inside LABEL tag is a good markup, since clicking 'label' will trigger the checkbox click even in IE8. Otherwise you will need to use JavaScript workaround to fix the same, which is additional code to your website.


0

Think Google. One search box with incremental filtering/autocomplete!. If you can even include personnel pictures along with the results, even better. It's quick and effective.


2

How many inputs should be presented on each page? And does this depend on categorisation of inputs? My thought is the grouping of the inputs is more important than the number. For example, the workflow for setting up an iOS device is divided into screens for language, Wi-Fi, location services, etc. The number of inputs for each grouping is less ...


0

The UX here depends on the type of input , user have to provide. Radio button [ 1 ] Check-box [ 1 ] Selection from a drop-down [ 1.5 ] Text inputs small ( 3 or less word in single field ) [ 2 ] Text inputs big ( 4 or more in single field ) [ 2.5 ] Now check your form pages, and try to use the elements in such a way that the sum stays less than 6-8 ...


2

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has created and maintains a wonderful website: http://www.usability.gov. It contains a wealth of UX resources of various types, including the ones from a government organization perspective (see section "Guidance and Government-specific Resources" at http://www.usability.gov/how-to-and-tools/index.html). Hope it ...


1

How about just bolding the ones which are "YES" and others greyed out.


0

I'd just display the attributes which apply and hide the ones which do not. Makes the list easier to read and you don't have to worry about styling the thing extensively for readability. This does not apply if users really need to compare veterans against each other (are Joe and Dean both Vietnam veterans).


2

You could try to group related, relevant information together and leave out mutually exclusive items. As it is a read-only format there's not a lot of use in displaying the mutually exclusive NO answers (and possibly also some other NO answers). I'd suppose that if Veteran is answered with NO all other Veteran related answers are obsolete and of no good ...


0

Here's one alternative option (obviously the actual madlibs form design will be different in your case, but hopefully you can see how you might allow the user to optionally add or remove a "sentence" of form controls): download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


2

How about an (red) "NO" icon or a (green) "Yes" icon to the left of each line? This way you save vertical space, but at least keep visual consistency (providing that you keep both icons the same width). Is there any other solution, like filtering the results to only show the positives or negatives, if that is what the user is after? This way you'll ...


1

The technical term for that is "Incremental Filtering". It's always hard (particularly in mobile) to show big sets of data, but IF the user is going to know who to send this to right away, for example, if the user is going to have the addressee already in mind, the expected behavior is for the user to start typing the friend's name, and this is optimum. I ...


0

I did some research while I was waiting for answers... http://uxfindings.blogspot.com/2014/06/is-numeric-spinner-best-name-for-this.html


1

I just designed multiple screens registration form in the iOS app. First we wanted to make it as single screen but then after little research I find out that it is much more comfortable for users when you split all informations in logical steps (2-3). It could be even more effective for the app developer. Let me explain. When user come to the registration ...


3

Ceefin's answer makes a very good point. By focusing too much on the details you can overlook what actually matters about UX, which is what the user experiences. And there's no more frustrating experience than a form that asks a simple question, then doesn't let you answer it. This kind of over-validation is horribly common with postal addresses-- I've ...


2

A clearly defined label stating what input is required by the user should prevent the problem of max length of the input field. There may well be people over the age of 99 using the internet now, so perhaps max length should be 3


1

I feel that the best solution would be to use a watermark (gray text in an input when it's empty) with the text 0-99. This clearly states that: Input has to be a number The range is from 0 to 99 There are even ready-made solutions for this, like jquery-watermark.


0

Make sure that the user can use any kind of input; mouse or keyboard (or touch for that matter). And through visual hints like: The width of the input field A representative-icon on the left side of the input field A placeholdertext/icon Possible (i)-icon on the right with hover-info Visually wrapping input boxes in a container You should be able to help ...


0

If I had to pick between these 2... I Personally would vote for the option on the right since this is a more hierachical/logical way of presenting question/answer relationships. By quickly scanning the form, it is easier to differentiate question from answer. However if you want to align text to the input vield, it would be more appropiate to create a ...


-1

I vote for right, but if possible reduce the left-margins of the text inside the comboboxes.


0

The most succinct - and generally most commonly used - way to distinguish a required field in forms is to use an asterisk next to the label (*). This way a user can easily distinguish which fields are required and which are not. So for example this pattern could look like: Label * [ input with placeholder/code hint text] If you think this could ...


0

While the option on the right creates a class-difference between label and the value. It also creates a visual confusion because of the alignments. Now we can align the labels with the border of the input-box, we can't do the same with the values. Best possible solution would be to align label and the value together, and create the class-difference between ...


0

The list as you have shown is called List View or Table View. The method, which you have shown is inserting a new record to the existing view.


0

This isn't based on any research except for the fact that my eyes are melting from the ugliness of the option on the left. The label should definitely line-up with the edge of the input box.


1

I have a couple of ideas. One possibility is to embolden the placeholder text of the required ones. That may not be very intuitive but it should at least indicate that there is a difference and they may be able to then infer from the fields that those are required and the other aren't. Likewise, you could italicize optional fields. Another is to add ...


0

If inputs has border then You can play with border color for example required a bordered black and additional in gray color. Or use * sign for placeholder text and label


1

One idea, if applicable based on your data set and architecture, could be to have : one single quick search field using predictive typing and live refresh of search results. Your users could then start typing, say, "repl 113" and the predictive typing would suggest "replenishment" as they type the "l" (in real time during typing, so difficult to render ...


5

I think this pattern can be called " List Entry View ". Full description can be found here, All list of patterns


0

Each item on each line should relate to one and other. For example "First Name" and "Second Name" Should be on the same line. Having columned forms doesn't have a great user experience.


0

MFC/Visual C++ has Pushbutton like radio buttons. I think this could be the right answer for you. Imagine the MS Word buttons for Align to left Align to centre Align to right Justified all not pressed and you have the unset state you are talking about.


0

Sites like CouchSurfing use forms of late "validation" that benefit the standings of users. That might not work in your case as you can't allow any valuable assets until your account is password-protected. As a user I don't think it'd be a big deal for me to fill in a username and password if I already need to fill other information. Why would I give you my ...


0

Why branch to 2 different options? Just generate the "template" name automatically, and leave it up to the user if they want to immediately click save, or if they want to edit the name before saving. Workflow: User chooses folder User presented with auto generated filename in an editable field, and a save button User can edit the filename (or not) and ...


0

not sure what problem you're solving by this approach, why not use a standard file save behaviour. This is built in on a mac, download the file, name it, save it to an existing or new folder. Seems like this should be simple.


1

Best practice would be to always have the field wide enough to display short fields like names, phone numbers, and emails, without the need to wrap the text to another line. Such fields will always have a technical constraint on their length imposed by the back end (data base field), and this will be quite conservative anyway for short fields (why set up a ...


0

Depending on the request of your client. I believe you can also incorporate those items into one single question. Such as: Is anyone is your household working in A, B or C? Yes/No.


8

Quite simply, you should avoid multi-column forms because people may interpret the form's flow in various ways.


1

One way is to show the users a message in bold text (probably even using highlighting) that the process is not completed and there is still a couple more things to be done. Secondly, if you think warning message might spook the user, you could display a progress bar at the top of the page from a step before the payment step until they complete the whole ...


5

You could add a "None of the above" option, then make the question required. You might then rephrase the question to "Which of the following areas are you or a member of your household employed?" Healthcare Manufacturing etc... None of the Above


0

Since there is no available way to force your users to tell the truth and all the truth, you cannot go further than validating in some way or the other that at leat one of the suggested options is ticked. Depending on your choices and the technology and scripts you use, you can enforce a data validation and display an ex-ante or ex-post notice : ex-ante ...


1

Picking from these two options I would prefer 2nd solution from various reasons: It's Windows application and the standard they handle entering and editing since early versions is a Save button. It means users will know how to use it and prefer not learning anything specific. In combination with TAB and keyword shortcuts it's the fastest and safest thing ...


4

Amazon's process keep you informed of both the entire process and the step you are currently completing : A suggestion could be : to inform your users at the beginning of the process and also before they start the payment that there will be another key step after that to always display an Amazon-like path and current step to send an email to your users ...


0

users then have to do some stuff in the real world, including downloading and printing some now-finalised documents, and taking them to the appointment they've booked as part of the online application process. Wouldn't that be similar to Print at Home Tickets that most ticketing agencies and theme parks offer? E.g. Legoland California's process is ...


1

After talking to our developers about what is possible with our data model, I've proposed a design similar to this: My users are only likely to change a field or two at a time, so instead of showing the entire form with 20 fields, it lets them select the field(s) they wish to edit and ignore the rest. In the event they select a conditional field I've ...


0

Hope I'm understanding the question correctly and that this helps. The tricky part is that this is a bulk edit mode, but the real functionality for editing desserts should be done individually - you just do not want to do that because it is labor intensive to do it one by one. Here is a rough idea of what I came up with. Essentially is you are still ...


1

Matt's solution seems very clear to me. However it depends on the number of CV's you are going to show them. If the person has approximately more than 5-6 CV's; I would suggest to have a selection box - combo box. I would also suggest to put the no-CV option at the checkout. I have another suggestion. selecting from a large list is something I deal with ...



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