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10

I can't help feeling that if you can't answer this question yourself, then you don't know what you are going to use the data for even when you have it. Maybe if you think about what data you actually need it might help? Do a little role playing where you put yourself in a position where you actually need to make use of this information in different ...


8

I gather you're using a select box because only 1 selection is valid? What about converting each option into a radio button? e.g. https://jsfiddle.net/mz9a22cd/


6

In any population, there will always be some outliers who don't do things the way most of the population does. Someone, surely, will fail to capitalize their name. What's the drawback, if users don't capitalize their own name? Do these names get used in a context where it might reflect poorly on the company? Do the names get used in legal documents or on ...


4

Yes, absolutely! It's more important to design for the best user experience and efficacy than to follow design patterns. In the end, patterns just codify a set of heuristics/experiences/guidelines so they aren't a replacement or an override for proper, tailored design. For the situation you're describing, it can make a LOT of sense to add a Clear button. ...


4

Although your interface is usable, it's important to utilize cohesiveness and decision-making in the case of image selection. By "toggle", I think your co-worker means the options should be more clear. Here are some mockups that might better illustrate what I mean: Drop Down This method is used heavily in social media, where the user intuitively clicks on ...


4

The main benefit to the two-step process is user clarity about their data and its status. Think of it almost as a virtual barrier between the new and old passwords. I entered my old password, which after this step I am done with. Now I am entering my new password, which I will use from now on. Versus I entered my old password, but now I am entering my ...


4

Neither, sort of. Classic radio buttons are intended for mandatory, single selections. I don't really like radio buttons because they are hard to click and it's not obvious (or consistent) that the labels can be clicked. Classic checkboxes are intended for single on/off selections. Button groups are sometimes used in situations where there is one or zero ...


3

I would keep the Organization and Individual options as radio buttons. Keeping one of them checked. If user selects Organization, I will just hide the Mr. field. And replace the address field with textarea to avoid multiple elements and clicks. Something like this:


3

Most of the cases I have used have the old and new password fields together, like Version 2 above. It is certainly what I would prefer, although of course your best course of action would be to ask your users, ideally by doing experiments to see which version yields the best results.


3

There's a trend towards using CSS and/or Javascript to show and hide secondary or additional content on the Web. Here's an older example from CSSNewbie: Click 'See more' to view hidden content: Click 'Hide more' to hide revealed content: I'll leave it up to you to determine which approach is 'best'. This approach—designing 'More Info' as a hidden div ...


3

Google explained why they are doing this: we're working towards introducing new authentication solutions that complement traditional passwords And later down in the blog: This new Google account sign-in flow will provide the following advantages: Preparation for future authentication solutions that complement passwords Reduced ...


3

I think combining the two could will be confusing. The reason why companies create two distinct paths is because those two are different paths. What happens if someone thinks they have an account, and then when they don't and they start registering and they don't want that, what then? This is forcing a user to register if they don't have a login, and that's ...


2

I assume you’re designing a public facing web site, where your target is to let new users register to be able to access content. And you want to decide whether to use Email or phone number when they register. If your goal is to get as many users as possible, my recommendation would be to use both. Some users like to register with their Email address and ...


2

The following would be the approach that I take when designing a form (some more context about the use of this contact form would be greatly appreciated to help improve this answer). Though you say that there are 20 required fields for this contact form I'd firstly pose two questions: Is there any contextual information / pre-population that you can ...


2

There are few ways to make long forms feel less lengthy group various fields together using things like spacing and visual separation (e.g. personal details, contact information,) Splitting the grouped fields into tabs or accordion so only one group can be seen at a time showing a progress bar or a step indicator to give the user an idea of their progress ...


2

The first question I would ask is why does he suggest using this? I find most fears about 'Users won't recognise ...' are unfounded: in both cases you have a form and a button; there is a good visual association between the two and it's just the wording that has changed, so users are likely to make the association. 'Sign in' has the benefit of being ...


2

Delete is a destructive action. Some systems are good in allowing you to undo deletes (e.g. email), but majority don't have undo actions and so when something is deleted it's gone for good. Going by the principal of "poka yoke" (mistake proofing). You want to design the interface to reduce unintentional deletion of data. Having the delete action within the ...


2

I think this is an instance where you need to push back on the client. Find out why they want icons, then create a couple of prototypes: one using labels, one using their suggested icons. Test with users, and ideally let the clients see the testing take place so they can see the problems.


2

The best icon is a text label. Also check: Should icons be used to represent "name" and "surname" in a form?


2

Mobile numbers will go away within a couple of years. Email is ageless technology. The difference is that in most countries a mobile phone number should be linked to a personal ID (passport/security ID, etc.) In mobile-oriented site or app it could be mindful to auth by phone no., but a user could have no one. Linking to the mobile number, you hard-link ...


2

I have to enter my University in often for various sign-ups, and I think a drop-down with an embedded search/input field might be the solution you're looking for: Start with a drop-down download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups Reveal a list with embedded search bar Allow the user to scroll through a list of colleges and ...


2

So your assumptions are that: The user needs to enter their current password again (even though the user is already logged in You need to confirm the password As a rule I'd go with fewer steps: the user has already expressed a desire to change their password; making it a 2-step process is putting a barrier in their way. In the same vein, confirming the ...


2

This sounds like you're trying for a "none of the above" option. A simple radio button option at the end of the list would do just fine. No need to make things complicated. e.g. Which of the following is an animal? ( ) Tree ( ) Car ( ) Radiowave (o) None of the Above


2

Have you considered putting each choice on a button and allowing the buttons to have distinctive depressed and undepressed images? Javascript coding them as you describe in option 3 would allow your users to choose zero to one of the provided options. Meanwhile, the use of buttons might make the hidden behaviour more intuitive.


1

It would be helpful to have more context; What exactly is being calculated? In general, consider it bad UX if the user doesn't have the option to start a new calculation without having to reload the page. On the other hand, maybe the user would like to compare different calculations, in which case having to clear the form could be bad UX. As is with real ...


1

From a quick look at the page, it would seem that one way of handling this is to issue a page wide banner/overlay which identifies errors and on-click the user is directed to the element which is wrong/missing. The element can also be highlighted.


1

• As Tomaz said, break down the form in simpler, logical steps; • Indicate the number of steps in the interface at all times; • Avoid sub-steps; • Use a single column for input, otherwise it might confuse users about what's optional and what's required (http://baymard.com/blog/avoid-multi-column-forms); • Each page should check for errors before ...


1

I 100% agree that there should be an option for a user to be able to cancel or go back rather than be forced to just save a draft. The following links are to iOS Human Interface Guidelines and Android Design Principles in an effort to support this arguement: iOS Human Interface Guidelines (Navigation) - ...


1

Suggest getting the user to nominate via radio button which they want to enter, and only displaying the relevant fields. Would also suggest flagging optional fields, especially if (as is usually the case!) the optional fields are the exception.


1

I agree: drop down menus that are more than, say, five words wide are cumbersome. Users won't (perhaps can't) read all of the text, and so the extra information means they actually comprehend less. I would either a) find a unique subset of the information (the address?) and have that in the select box, or find another way to choose this (property ID, with a ...



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