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51

It is a general question that can be answered with a general answer: One more than is actually required by the business is too many. In other words, make sure all the required fields are essential to allow the user to progress. All too often, the required fields are only required in the sense that someone on the business side wanted the field, rather than ...


42

Rather than focussing on the Z or column pattern, you might want to consider grouping related information. In your example it might be confusing for the user that Address and City are not grouped together. So you could group the name fields, the address fields (Address, City, Postal Code and Country), the contact fields (E-mail and Telephone) and lastly ...


24

This post from Hubspot shows some interesting results for the number of form fields vs converstion: http://blog.hubspot.com/blog/tabid/6307/bid/6746/Which-Types-of-Form-Fields-Lower-Landing-Page-Conversions.aspx They then (partially) break this down by input type. It's interesting to note that conversion appears to go up with from 1 to 3 fields and ...


10

Quite simply, you should avoid multi-column forms because people may interpret the form's flow in various ways.


5

I think this pattern can be called " List Entry View ". Full description can be found here, All list of patterns


5

You could add a "None of the above" option, then make the question required. You might then rephrase the question to "Which of the following areas are you or a member of your household employed?" Healthcare Manufacturing etc... None of the Above


5

Yes you should! Your suggestion about having a validation rule would be a very bad idea. Did you know, the world's most common last name is 王? Here is a classic article that you need to read: http://www.kalzumeus.com/2010/06/17/falsehoods-programmers-believe-about-names/ All of these assumptions are wrong: (...) People’s names are written in ...


5

There is an official aria-label attribute that seems to do what you're looking for. You would probably label the input field like this: <input name="q" aria-label="Search query"> I haven't been able to find out whether or not screen readers support it.


5

Anyone who does fast data entry regularly as part of there job (from sales reps to screen traders) will prefer to do everything via the keyboard. You are on the right track with the tab order, but there are a few more things you can do. Tabs are great for moving field, but you can also have a higher level navigation (shortcut keys***) to allow users to ...


4

This depends on what kind of information you're trying to gather. In general, the correct number of required fields is the absolute minimum number of fields required to make a record usable. If you are collecting information about a new user in your system, you may need only an email/username and a password. Without a username or password, a user record ...


4

Amazon's process keep you informed of both the entire process and the step you are currently completing : A suggestion could be : to inform your users at the beginning of the process and also before they start the payment that there will be another key step after that to always display an Amazon-like path and current step to send an email to your users ...


3

Ceefin's answer makes a very good point. By focusing too much on the details you can overlook what actually matters about UX, which is what the user experiences. And there's no more frustrating experience than a form that asks a simple question, then doesn't let you answer it. This kind of over-validation is horribly common with postal addresses-- I've ...


3

I would use a radio list and include "don't attach a CV" as one of the options. Don't modify the behaviour of checkboxes - that would be misleading. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


3

It depends. If they are all off by a bit, then yea, from a pure visual consistency point of view, they probably should be tweaked to all be the same length. But if they are containing entirely different values, then it may not make sense. For instance, perhaps once drop down is state abbreviations, and the other is a list of ingredients found on a ...


2

The order is more important that leading with the default. You should present the choices in the order the user expects. If a list is in the right order, the user will be able to mentally chunk it and rely on their past experiences to basically not read the entire list. If the highlighted button is near the middle or the top or the bottom they can make an ...


2

A clearly defined label stating what input is required by the user should prevent the problem of max length of the input field. There may well be people over the age of 99 using the internet now, so perhaps max length should be 3


2

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has created and maintains a wonderful website: http://www.usability.gov. It contains a wealth of UX resources of various types, including the ones from a government organization perspective (see section "Guidance and Government-specific Resources" at http://www.usability.gov/how-to-and-tools/index.html). Hope it ...


2

How many inputs should be presented on each page? And does this depend on categorisation of inputs? My thought is the grouping of the inputs is more important than the number. For example, the workflow for setting up an iOS device is divided into screens for language, Wi-Fi, location services, etc. The number of inputs for each grouping is less ...


2

You could try to group related, relevant information together and leave out mutually exclusive items. As it is a read-only format there's not a lot of use in displaying the mutually exclusive NO answers (and possibly also some other NO answers). I'd suppose that if Veteran is answered with NO all other Veteran related answers are obsolete and of no good ...


2

How about an (red) "NO" icon or a (green) "Yes" icon to the left of each line? This way you save vertical space, but at least keep visual consistency (providing that you keep both icons the same width). Is there any other solution, like filtering the results to only show the positives or negatives, if that is what the user is after? This way you'll ...


2

The relevant WCAG 2.0 guideline is 3.3.2 Labels or Instructions: Labels or instructions are provided when content requires user input. (Level A) A possible technique to achieve this is G167: Using an adjacent button to label the purpose of a field: When a button invokes a function on an input field, has a clear text label, and is rendered adjacent ...


2

I worked as Creative and UX Director at a large eCommerce company for many years and I can tell you that: A) There is no clear figures on the effectiveness of the payment gateway. (After all, as a buyer, that doesn't alter the safety of the transaction, so what do I care?) B) There are studies (conveniently conducted by the SSL companies) that show a ...


2

It's not explicitly two forms, since credentials are intuitive enough that users are able to recognize the username/password boxes with a low cognitive load. I actually agree with having login forms on the same page, because if you always click on continue without logging in, you are just adding an extra step for that user. But, just because they are on ...


2

This is a "Depends" answer but I'll explain why. I'm with you, 99.99% of the time all I care about is a shipping address. However I never ship stuff to my home. Almost everything I get delivered gets delivered during business hours - when I'm at work! So to avoid any missed deliveries (or stolen packages from my porch) I get everything delivered to my ...


2

I would advise strongly against removing the step, but to add it as optional step instead. There are a lot of reasons why the billing and shipping address could differ, e.g. people order goods to be sent to their offices people purchase goods as presents some people simply have a second address ... That being said, here's the main reason why you need the ...


1

Here is a good piece on the required marked vs. optional marked fields: http://uxmovement.com/forms/why-users-fill-out-less-if-you-mark-required-fields/ Marking the few optional field takes the onus of the user so much, and aesthetically having numerous red stars next to your fields does not make for an easy to absorb form.


1

The technical term for that is "Incremental Filtering". It's always hard (particularly in mobile) to show big sets of data, but IF the user is going to know who to send this to right away, for example, if the user is going to have the addressee already in mind, the expected behavior is for the user to start typing the friend's name, and this is optimum. I ...


1

How about just bolding the ones which are "YES" and others greyed out.


1

I just designed multiple screens registration form in the iOS app. First we wanted to make it as single screen but then after little research I find out that it is much more comfortable for users when you split all informations in logical steps (2-3). It could be even more effective for the app developer. Let me explain. When user come to the registration ...


1

One idea, if applicable based on your data set and architecture, could be to have : one single quick search field using predictive typing and live refresh of search results. Your users could then start typing, say, "repl 113" and the predictive typing would suggest "replenishment" as they type the "l" (in real time during typing, so difficult to render ...



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