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52

It is a general question that can be answered with a general answer: One more than is actually required by the business is too many. In other words, make sure all the required fields are essential to allow the user to progress. All too often, the required fields are only required in the sense that someone on the business side wanted the field, rather than ...


47

I would suggest a miniature progress wheel at the end of the input that only displays once a search is going on. I've seen this behavior before (I believe on user name boxes) and I believe that progress wheels are so clear that everyone will understand that something is going on. Once a user types, hide it briefly (or grey out to reduce flicker) and then ...


24

This post from Hubspot shows some interesting results for the number of form fields vs converstion: http://blog.hubspot.com/blog/tabid/6307/bid/6746/Which-Types-of-Form-Fields-Lower-Landing-Page-Conversions.aspx They then (partially) break this down by input type. It's interesting to note that conversion appears to go up with from 1 to 3 fields and ...


13

Generalising between platforms I would go with the following basic guidelines, they further emphasise a disabled field with a grey background. Normal (with a value) Black text, white background, black border. Normal (with a placeholder) Grey text, white background, black border. Disabled Grey text, slightly lighter grey bg, grey border. E.g.


11

If I understood you right, then you are practically working on an autocomplete field. The standard for those is to offer search results like with a dropdown on the bottom. Therefore the easiest thing would be to add searching... as first item in the drop down whenever a search is performed. Maybe animate the … / three dots . .. ... (reset) ...


7

In most cases, forms are made of native elements and the look and feel is therefor (ideally) determined by the operating system. Mac OS has a different way of showing something is disabled if you compare it to windows. Here are two text fields of Windows XP and Mac OS X with native behavior: vs. I would advice you not to change this behavior for several ...


6

Anyone who does fast data entry regularly as part of there job (from sales reps to screen traders) will prefer to do everything via the keyboard. You are on the right track with the tab order, but there are a few more things you can do. Tabs are great for moving field, but you can also have a higher level navigation (shortcut keys***) to allow users to ...


6

Some things I have seen done before in this scenario: Make placeholder text green instead of grey (user input is in black) Placeholder text is in italics (user input is in normal text) Put angle brackets around text, eg. < your name here >. (This one is somewhat "technical", i.e. something a programmer is more likely to understand) I would suggest ...


5

There is an official aria-label attribute that seems to do what you're looking for. You would probably label the input field like this: <input name="q" aria-label="Search query"> I haven't been able to find out whether or not screen readers support it.


5

Yes you should! Your suggestion about having a validation rule would be a very bad idea. Did you know, the world's most common last name is 王? Here is a classic article that you need to read: http://www.kalzumeus.com/2010/06/17/falsehoods-programmers-believe-about-names/ All of these assumptions are wrong: (...) People’s names are written in ...


4

It depends. If they are all off by a bit, then yea, from a pure visual consistency point of view, they probably should be tweaked to all be the same length. But if they are containing entirely different values, then it may not make sense. For instance, perhaps once drop down is state abbreviations, and the other is a list of ingredients found on a ...


4

This depends on what kind of information you're trying to gather. In general, the correct number of required fields is the absolute minimum number of fields required to make a record usable. If you are collecting information about a new user in your system, you may need only an email/username and a password. Without a username or password, a user record ...


4

Don't implement bad UX just because it's legacy. Updating several fields on different items and then save all elements in once is a really bad idea. How do you provide feedback to the user that item 1 (fields 1,6,7,8 where saved), item 2 (fields 2,4,5,6) were saved and item 3 (fields 2,3,7 where saved but field 9 has an illegal character) in an all-in-once ...


4

I would advise strongly against removing the step, but to add it as optional step instead. There are a lot of reasons why the billing and shipping address could differ, e.g. people order goods to be sent to their offices people purchase goods as presents some people simply have a second address ... That being said, here's the main reason why you need the ...


4

You need to consider the form-factor the users will be using and also avoid latency between questions. Displaying sequentially can reduce the "clutter" and would work better in many situations such as smaller screens, but should be done dynamically client side if possible to get near instant transitions. Loading new content from the server on every press ...


4

'Search' is universally associated with the functionality you've described above. When the user comes to the page, the button takes secondary importance as you need the user to do some filtering/ selections first. In this case, you can keep the button greyed out till all required selections have been made. 'Update results' would be a good choice if the ...


4

I'd suggest you go with the empty item. For two reasons: To be consistent with your criteria options. Why should a user have to leave the date fields empty to get the complete range but have to select an option when it comes to types You usually refine your search by applying filters. Selecting "All" does not refine your search result whereas selecting a ...


3

I don't have any "official" or user tested information about this, but in the examples you have detailed in your question, the sentence case works well for answer which are based around a response you would generally hear someone speak. It makes sense that "value" answers would be capitalized. i.e. Express Delivery Economy Delivery


3

I've designed both formats of quiz. Which one is better depends on the situation. Both formats tend to be equally doable from a technical standpoint. Situations where I've found all questions on one page to be better: When the user is allowed to answer the questions in any order When information from one question helps the user answer another question ...


3

Profile your current usage. Find out what fields are most commonly used, and group them together, or at least float them to the tops of their sections. For example, do you really require the user to select UK at the start of every call? Is that something you might change for only 5% of your calls? Can you move it down, or out of the way, so most calls don't ...


3

I am for the version on the right. Here's why, from a Typographic, Design Element, and Human perspective. From a Typographic Alignment Perspective In the examples I show, I have stripped the input box so you can see it purely from a typographic perspective. Visual hierarchy looks like this: See me first - See me second See me third - See me fourth ...


3

I associate "search" with a more open-ended query, almost always involving a text box input (though not necessarily keyword search). The process you're describing I think is more "filtering". I would use a filter icon (a funnel) as opposed to a search icon (magnifying glass). I also really like "Show Matching ...". Definitely not "Find", though, as that ...


3

I think the search icon (great icon by the way) can be used to make the user understand that a search is going on pretty much as is. The only changes I would make are: The icon should only be displayed while a search is going on, once the search is over the icon should disappear While the search is going on, the icon should be blinking (optional) The ...


2

The top answer is excellent, but I thought I would share an alternate idea for this. I would love to know if others think this is useable/a good idea, since I don't have any research or data to back this up: A colored bar, either on the right or bottom, like a "progress bar" shows how much relative text has been entered. It is green until some point, then ...


2

I worked as Creative and UX Director at a large eCommerce company for many years and I can tell you that: A) There is no clear figures on the effectiveness of the payment gateway. (After all, as a buyer, that doesn't alter the safety of the transaction, so what do I care?) B) There are studies (conveniently conducted by the SSL companies) that show a ...


2

First, actually consider your security. Is your form safe from reasonable levels of attack? If there's a chance data could get out, stop and fix that first. Are you SSL certified? Are your POSTing your data? Are you taking all reasonable steps to ensure safety of the data? Anyway, onto the problem at hand. If you've got a design scheme, as a general rule ...


2

The relevant WCAG 2.0 guideline is 3.3.2 Labels or Instructions: Labels or instructions are provided when content requires user input. (Level A) A possible technique to achieve this is G167: Using an adjacent button to label the purpose of a field: When a button invokes a function on an input field, has a clear text label, and is rendered adjacent ...


2

It's not explicitly two forms, since credentials are intuitive enough that users are able to recognize the username/password boxes with a low cognitive load. I actually agree with having login forms on the same page, because if you always click on continue without logging in, you are just adding an extra step for that user. But, just because they are on ...


2

This is a "Depends" answer but I'll explain why. I'm with you, 99.99% of the time all I care about is a shipping address. However I never ship stuff to my home. Almost everything I get delivered gets delivered during business hours - when I'm at work! So to avoid any missed deliveries (or stolen packages from my porch) I get everything delivered to my ...


2

Maybe the button could say, "Show All," before any options are selected, (or if no options are selected, if that's a possibility.) Then when an option is changed, change the button label to say something like, "Show Matching Records." I think the, "Show Matching," label is appropriate in this case, because your users are trying to match the selected ...



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