Hot answers tagged

7

For editing values in a text field, it depends where you edit them, and what other fields are in its context: if the layout stays data-table-like, and the cell simply becomes editable, then I agree with @Erisu's answer, to conform to excel-like solution. if the text field is in a form, it is better to be consistent across fields, to prevent user having to ...


5

Looking at Excel as an example, when a cell becomes a numeric value, the numbers are right aligned. When double clicking into the cell to edit, they maintain the content right aligned. As people are accustom to Excel, it might be sound to follow the same flow?


4

How about something where admins can click/drag the hours for each day. You could provide extra feedback of the actual hours selected during this action.


4

If you like graphical solutions you may try something like this: Clicking in the stripe below the edit field helps to select the hours without typing them. User may also click and drag, if they like.


3

You could indicate lines separately. Also, you could try showing a visual marker for lines to indicate there are only 10 lines of space. Here is a quick sketch -


2

I agree with the octern that it depends on whether choosing a future date is helpful or not... An example of how this is done today is how Google Analytics shows their date picker. Since there is no valid state for a report of the future they gray out the content:


2

I'm not sure when this section was added, but currently, the specs do have a short section about required fields: To indicate that a field is required, display an asterisk (*) next to the field. At the bottom of the form, include a note explaining that an asterisk indicates a required field.


2

Have the user agree separately to each term and condition you specifically want them to be aware of: Label1 [Textbox] Label2 [Textbox] Terms and Conditions [Textarea] [] I will not upload any copyrighted material to this service [] I promise to be respectful to other users [] I am aware that all my usage data will be sold to the Russian mafia [Submit] By ...


2

Here's a quick sketch of something you can try: You can add multiple websites and hierarchies and make the location field specific to that combination of website and hierarchy. You can also individually close each field. I think it's important let users toggle between multiple combinations that you have, which could also be done easily in this ...


2

This is unfortunately a "it depends" question. A good request ticket should contain sufficient details for the customer support staff to diagnose the issue. How much info is required depends on what you're trying to troubleshoot. Another thing to consider is that a longer description does not necessarily make it's more helpful if it's filled with irrelevant ...


1

Like JDanniel Pacheco, i think the best solution would be to group the possible options. But I would go for something like this: Additionally, you can let the user maybe enter the filter themselves like:


1

Both patterns are in use across a wide variety of applications, so there's no definitive answer. Most operating system menus have settled on graying out invalid options, so absent any other consideration you might want to follow their lead. Consider your users. Are they employees (aka a captive audience?) They may be trained and adapt more rapidly to hiding ...


1

I think you need a clear indication that location is the same, but let user change it: I would leave them with no option to rollback to "Same as Pickup" because it makes layout less crowded, but if you notice that this option is valuable you may add a link to "undo" or "cancel".


1

Here is my solution to collect working times:


1

There is no reason to add a field into a form if you dont really need that information. In e-commerce the average abandonment rate is near at 70% (contact form could have some analogies). In each guidelines for form designing, one of the main suggestions is ever to make the form as simply as possible, avoiding all unnecessary requests.


1

In 2010, the Post Office stopped the requirement for including County in a postal address so it is indeed not necessary to keep it for the purposes of 'a complete address'. Currently on the Post Office help system, the answer to the question Should I use a county name in my address? is: When you address your mail, you don’t need to include a county name ...


1

Unfortunately there is no way to force the long-winded to speak more concisely; a hard character limit is a band-aid approach that often just results in the user filing multiple partial reports your support staff will need to piece together to make sense of. By all means you can encourage it by using smaller input fields, but a hard limit will just annoy ...


1

Assuming lengthy support requests are a true problem for the support team, limiting characters may not solve the problem. Your user will only discover the character limit when they intended to write more. That only leads to anger and discontentment. Find out what kind of information your support team wants in each request, and use chunking to extract that ...


1

Managing Readability As you rightly pointed out, the alignment rule works best when the data is in a list/tabular format. Basically when the user will have to scan related vertically. It is the context around the data that defines the alignment. If the context remains the same then do retain the same alignment. If it is a mixed data, like a form, ...


1

Even though this is an older post, the core issue remains. ChrisF makes a valid point--core functionality of the Web browser shouldn't be disabled unless absolutely necessary. Also, adding text instructions may often be overlooked/ignored by users. A good possible solution is to incorporate some JavaScript that will alert the user if they attempt to use ...


1

It's important that each pairing of selects has a parent label to bind them. A side benefit of this is it provides you a full line width – it could actually wrap to multiple lines and still work property – in which to explain the purpose of each grouping.


1

It's helpful that you grouped optional information together and avoided the annoying red asterisks. However, why repeat "(optional)" for each select? Group them as optional under a single headline after required fields, thus reducing cognitive load and length for the long labels.


1

Option 2 is the clear choice. The field labels need to read as labels and not data right from the start. In options 1 and 3, before a selection is made, the labels are indistinguishable from data. Additionally, it is important that the labels remain persistent in style and location to avoid confusion, unnecessary learning, and a sense of instability. Once ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible