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5

Unlike B2C shopping sites where you can display a list of popular items or new promotions, there is nothing useful that you can display when it comes to finding employees, so a simple search field would suffice. You might also want to consider including a department filter if it help the user to narrow down the search criteria (assuming your data model ...


4

Here's a different idea, what about a department list? Just brainstorming in terms of what people might be doing when it comes to looking at a list of employees. If I know the name of the person I'm looking for, I'll directly search for that. I'm guessing the 2nd most common case would probably be "I know the person is in XYZ department". Instead of ...


4

Actually you have already answered your half of the question. Que - "If the system knows all the data, why can't the user just input the unique ID?" Ans - "The reason for this breakdown in input and validation is an extra security measure." But the important thing here is the flow. Current Flow (doesn't make any sense): Step 1: Personal Details Check ...


3

The approach that you have used here is reasonable but it needs some tweaks to make the user better understand the flow of the validation process. As a user, I would prefer to have the details that have to be filled first to be kept on top and once the user fills the details they can click the find & match button to enable the unique identity field. ...


3

I've had to handle a similar situation like this recently. You can try having each question on a single page and track the users progress with a fluid progress bar (dots will just highlight the length). For the dropdown, you can have a scrollable dropdown view, so the user can scroll that instead of the page without loosing focus.


2

Range sliders has a technical advantage above the input field as it will require less validation in order to make secure. For the very same reason it can benefit the user since a range slider wont raise an unnecessary error due to "malformed" input. Range sliders are, however, somewhat limited in that they cannot allow an infinite range of numbers which ...


2

If all fields are mandatory, then you do not need to put asterisks next to everything - just put a message at the top of the form saying all fields are required. When you click Save you still need to do field validation and report fields which have not been completed.


2

Why do you think interacting with select boxes is annoying? Remember not all mouse clicks are to be considered bad. Select boxes have been around for a very, very long time, and are a neat concise way to select a value. You can also set a default value (if it makes sense), which could be beneficial to the user because they may not even need to interact with ...


2

It seems like security matters the designers of the system, not UX. The identification process is indeed confusing and, from first site, does not make sense. I would like to raise another point. You are saying: ...the unique identifier might contain tiny errors (like one digit smudged or missing)... But in case the name and address are are strictly ...


2

As you will already have the mobile number, go for the most restrictive questions first in order to prevent frustration and avoid a negative experience on the first contact with the company/brand/product. At the point of the 'not qualified' notification, then you could ask if they would like to be notified when they qualify. This would workaround data ...


2

It sounds very important to the business that this information be exactly correct. You're right--it could be done with just a primary key entry, however, being this strict with the matching process decreases the likelihood of mistakes or incorrect matches. I have worked on a similar project where we validate data based on user-uploaded documents, and there ...


2

Dependending on the type of information you need in your app, I too think a Facebook login can help with a quick start, like Paul mentioned. Rewarding people for filling out their user profile also works great. Have a look at LinkedIn for example, telling you via mail or after login that you've completed 70% of your profile. You'll be amazed what a simple ...


2

In terms of a users experience whatever is fastest will be best. If you can get all records on the page and search them in the memory of the browser faster than you can send a search request over the wire that will be the better way of doing it. Unless you can know why people would be searching the employee records in some way I don't think you can possibly ...


2

I think you're on the right track. However, I do think you need to consider a few things. Multi-step forms My wife's parents own a farm and you never know what can happen on any given day (tractor breaking down, missing cows, faulty livestock scales, etc) so I would provide: a way for the user to select which part of the multi-step form they want to ...


2

Looking at the image, the first thing that is somewhat similar came to my mind was, Windows Registry Editor. According to me there are 2 changes you could do, they are: 1) Keeping three columns as it is and just removing (replacing) top and below buttons of ADD,DELETE, SAVE & CANCEL. 2) Changing layout to two columns and on double click of attribute ...


2

Label the fields clearly (high contrast between font and background). Make sure that there is enough space between the fields to avoid misclicks and the likes. Ensure that labels are closest to the corresponding input field compared to any other form input Don't solely rely on inline labels as those disappear usually when you start typing. Ensure that the ...


2

I would do the following: Either go with radio buttons or a segmented control to really show that this is a multiple choice - single answer question. Of course you can style them so they look something like this. Put the labels for the icons (BIKE and CAR) below the icons, but inside the circle (or whatever you end up using). Increase the font size and ...


1

No, there is no sensible reason for doing this. It is bad UX, plain and simple. Disabling pasting into a password field is actually encouraging bad passwords. Password managers automatically clear out the clipboard after pasting, so that argument is no longer valid.


1

Thanks for pointing out this behavior. I do it too, completing forms without examining them. This is the kind of thing that makes us want to call users stupid. Of course they're not, they're just taking shortcuts through the parts of the site that they'd rather not be in. The obvious answer, I think, is to rearrange the fields so the password field is last. ...


1

I think this is a real case where a user is expecting an established design pattern (that of a username field followed immediately by a password field, or a username field, password field & confirm password field together) and is being tripped up by encountering something else. In this instance, the cost is that passwords are being typed into clear-text ...


1

The simple answer is you cannot stop people doing stupid things. This is what makes us human rather than a robot. As designers, all we can do is devise as many guard rails in your design as you can, but these cannot totally eliminate all dumb behaviour - there will always be someone who will do something stupid that totally surprises you. I doubt your ...


1

As was pointed out in a comment, I would revisit the idea of using a multiline text field instead. I'm sure you can find a way to watch for changes -- for example, on Android, there's a TextWatcher class you can use. Another option is to make the field look like a text field, but open up a dialog when it is clicked. If you still opt for an edit button, ...


1

In our program we showed an empty list with a message saying something like "Select your criteria and click Search."and users hated it. Apparently some were thinking that there were no employees in the list. We end up showing the first page (10 records) of the unfiltered list. I personally like the idea of showing the most recently "used" records. Meaning ...


1

The rule in ecommerce is to NEVER return an empty page after search. Show similar items or when the search query is to incoherent, show popular items or items on sale. But you're asking about default. If there's room you could show something. Recent searches would be a good one. Facebook displays those if you linger in the search box for a few seconds. I ...


1

I can think of three reasons: Security -- requiring multi-factor authentication of the database record is a pretty effective security measure; very important for sensitive data like voter records. Error checking -- it's very easy to make a mistake when entering a number. It would be easy to attribute the scan to the wrong individual, many times over. The ...


1

If the goal is accuracy and reducing errors, then the second one (dynamic dropdown lists) is better. If the goal is speed, then the first one (let user type) is better. There is lots of articles online about dropdown lists not being ideal. The main reason is that it takes a (1) click (2) scroll down a long list (3) select. Most users can type pretty fast ...


1

You might do two versions and A/B test them to compare the user reception and content results. One with confirmation checkbox (additional step) that blocks the 'Submit' action. Second one could be sth simplified, like this: It's clear call to action and should raise the awareness of the newcomer but would not block the flow of the frequent user.



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