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47

I would suggest a miniature progress wheel at the end of the input that only displays once a search is going on. I've seen this behavior before (I believe on user name boxes) and I believe that progress wheels are so clear that everyone will understand that something is going on. Once a user types, hide it briefly (or grey out to reduce flicker) and then ...


13

Generalising between platforms I would go with the following basic guidelines, they further emphasise a disabled field with a grey background. Normal (with a value) Black text, white background, black border. Normal (with a placeholder) Grey text, white background, black border. Disabled Grey text, slightly lighter grey bg, grey border. E.g.


11

If I understood you right, then you are practically working on an autocomplete field. The standard for those is to offer search results like with a dropdown on the bottom. Therefore the easiest thing would be to add searching... as first item in the drop down whenever a search is performed. Maybe animate the … / three dots . .. ... (reset) ...


11

A few things about your question and some next steps: User Experience Experts are just people that swallow their pride & know to ask their users / customers. I'd like to think my experience gives me a solid base for presenting better-than-average first-shots, but I know that users ultimately control the direction of my work. I wouldn't necessarily ...


7

In most cases, forms are made of native elements and the look and feel is therefor (ideally) determined by the operating system. Mac OS has a different way of showing something is disabled if you compare it to windows. Here are two text fields of Windows XP and Mac OS X with native behavior: vs. I would advice you not to change this behavior for several ...


6

Some things I have seen done before in this scenario: Make placeholder text green instead of grey (user input is in black) Placeholder text is in italics (user input is in normal text) Put angle brackets around text, eg. < your name here >. (This one is somewhat "technical", i.e. something a programmer is more likely to understand) I would suggest ...


4

I'd suggest you go with the empty item. For two reasons: To be consistent with your criteria options. Why should a user have to leave the date fields empty to get the complete range but have to select an option when it comes to types You usually refine your search by applying filters. Selecting "All" does not refine your search result whereas selecting a ...


4

'Search' is universally associated with the functionality you've described above. When the user comes to the page, the button takes secondary importance as you need the user to do some filtering/ selections first. In this case, you can keep the button greyed out till all required selections have been made. 'Update results' would be a good choice if the ...


3

I don't have any "official" or user tested information about this, but in the examples you have detailed in your question, the sentence case works well for answer which are based around a response you would generally hear someone speak. It makes sense that "value" answers would be capitalized. i.e. Express Delivery Economy Delivery


3

I am for the version on the right. Here's why, from a Typographic, Design Element, and Human perspective. From a Typographic Alignment Perspective In the examples I show, I have stripped the input box so you can see it purely from a typographic perspective. Visual hierarchy looks like this: See me first - See me second See me third - See me fourth ...


3

I associate "search" with a more open-ended query, almost always involving a text box input (though not necessarily keyword search). The process you're describing I think is more "filtering". I would use a filter icon (a funnel) as opposed to a search icon (magnifying glass). I also really like "Show Matching ...". Definitely not "Find", though, as that ...


3

I think the search icon (great icon by the way) can be used to make the user understand that a search is going on pretty much as is. The only changes I would make are: The icon should only be displayed while a search is going on, once the search is over the icon should disappear While the search is going on, the icon should be blinking (optional) The ...


2

I suggest a grid so the user have the choice to focus on one phone at the time (vertically) or on the features (horizontally) download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


2

Maybe the button could say, "Show All," before any options are selected, (or if no options are selected, if that's a possibility.) Then when an option is changed, change the button label to say something like, "Show Matching Records." I think the, "Show Matching," label is appropriate in this case, because your users are trying to match the selected ...


2

Avoid abstracting the label from the control wherever possible. That is, avoid separating the control and the label that describes the control's state because that forces the user to look in two different places in order to understand what's going on. Instead combine them so that the control clearly describes its own state. In this particular situation, I ...


2

I've just thought about this way: or this way: It sounds far more explicit.


2

The only difference between the two forms are the percentage and the dollar sign. So you change it dynamically. I suppose you can only show the amount if you have the dollar values, but can show the percentage either way. Here's a mockup of my idea: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


2

It's not about whether or not to follow trends just because Facebook has done it. No doubt, Facebook has likely done loads of user research on what is more intuitive for most of their users. Source: How does something become "common knowledge"? You should do your own research to see what makes the most sense. In your case, the best way to ...


1

You want help text to be placed where the user has a question (e.g., “How do I apply this message to all the emails I’ve listed?”). You also want a control to be placed where the user is ready to activate it (e.g., “I’ve written my message and entered my emails, now I want to apply the message to all the emails.”). It follows that, in a properly laid out ...


1

Setting a max length for the fields would be advisable rather than changing the size depending upon the longest entry in a database. For instance, the "Contact name" field can be set to a maximum size of 200 characters. This would help stabilize the alignment of the form that you set. However, if that is not possible, you can use the, "one field per row" ...


1

You must have a clearly marked exit (Jakob Nielsen - Usability Engineering). You should have two buttons labeled "OK" and "Cancel". Do NOT add an "X", to avoid confusion.


1

Non-sensitive data can be stored on the users computer. Local Storage, cookies, whatever mechanism you find appropiate. have alternate server or alternate mechanism of sumission are all possible solutions. Thing you should think about are : Public computers. People may be filling the form on another person or public computer, saving data in this scenario ...


1

You could use a cookie for the data or store it in a browser database via html5. Even flash cookies might be a workaround. It depends a little on security aspect of data - I wouldnt store banking data offline - and the browser settings. You might find some more ideas if you search web for techniques for evercookie and mobile offline. And the user flow: ...


1

Registration should capture only the minimum required details. But if you want to still capture more details, then you could get them first confirm their email id. The other details that you would like to capture could be done say from their profile page or say the account page.


1

Well, what about putting a notification with the number of attached files below the email body, followed by the "attach" button, and then followed by the "send" button? That way is impossible to miss! I think all the problem comes from bad possitioning of the elements: If there is a top bar, the "attach" button should be the FIRST thing a user sees, and ...


1

I suggest progressive disclosure on this issue. Do not disable and enable them but instead keep them hidden until the approriate selection is made in the form. Then show them the field. http://www.nngroup.com/articles/progressive-disclosure/


1

Of couse integrated payment form is better once you handled all possible cases like user payed, navigated back to enter more info on prevoius step and then navigated forward etc. It is not only about UX. Its about security, trust and technical problems. To accept payments inside your webside some security procedures have to be applied. For example PCI DSS ...


1

Even though options 1 and 2 are generally speaking safer, Facebook's approach relies also on a wide range of extra security options the user can manage via your "Security" panel: If you combine the "infinite" approach with these advanced security options and an https connection I think you have a solution that is safer enough in most (not all) cases. ...


1

I am a bit confused by all the people suggesting this is about AutoComplete. AutoComplete suggests a completion of what you are typing, eg: Google suggesting search phrases. That is not the same as showing search results. I think conflating the two and the fact that a search is taking time is going to cause confusion. I like the idea of a little search ...


1

From what I understand, you want the user to be aware that the TaxCode field is a autocomplete field and a search is being performed as they type. In my experience, making the field a drop down with auto-complete filtering has worked. I'm assuming that the values in Tax Code are not random user generated values and that the value entered can be one of a ...



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