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73

Render the confirmation in a modal: This will highlight explicitly to the user that one more action is needed.


19

I don't like the words Submit Request - as a designer that is what pressing the button does. For a user, it is more-or-less as meaningless as Press This Button. I don't think Send Request is much better, possibly worse (where is the request going to be sent to?). I suggest Place Booking if that is what your system is about: booking a course somewhere. ...


10

Change the behavior to fit the intuition You might want to change the behavior to fit the user intuition, instead of changing the design to "make the user understand" the behavior that you originally intended. If there are no major reasons for the details to be set in stone at that point (and they aren't, since apparently they can cancel it before the ...


9

You should really change the wording on your primary action buttons to make it absolutely clear. "Submitting request" or "Send request" is what your browser does when the user clicks a link or button, but "Pay for session" is what the user wants or has to do in this context to continue. By using a modal dialog you show the user that he has to complete the ...


4

1. Pre-filling a text input increases cognitive load The function of a text input is to get text from a user. We need to tell a user what kind of text we are expecting and this can be done using labels, placeholders, inline hints, etc. A label directly above the text input is the best way to communicate what a user should input. As you have already ...


4

If each combobox is always going to have the same set of possible values, you could instead use a DataGridView with multiselectable cells, and change that "Copy to all" button into a "Set Selected Cells" button, so the user has to ctrl+click the cell they want to modify, select the value from the ComboBox and press that Button. This also lets the user select ...


4

Add a 'confirmation' tab last, after 'submit' (and change 'submit' text to 'summary'), so the user knows there's another section to go before they're done. It's odd for user to be on the last step in tabbed checkouts, but not be done.


3

Your page gives everything equal weighting, and this is why it looks like a summary page - your instincts are correct. Pick some stuff to highlight, such as what they have bought and how much. The summary information you have here is good. My previous user testing has shown that customers really do read it and use it for correction. For that reason I don't ...


3

You should consider that your checkout funnel is too long. ( so many steps in your progress bar. Think about combining or eliminating of some steps ) , this may scary users + too many opportunities for user to leave funnel w/o converting.


3

I encountered something very similar. Our solution was to hide the radio button options with an EDIT link and add a SAVE button for validation, then re-hide. Worked for our situation.


3

You could try making the toggle start in the center of the switch. Then once the user starts interacting with it it toggles only to the on/off states, the centered position is just the default "unset" state. I imagine this would be a bit confusing to users on first glance though so a radio button would probably be more intuitive for required fields. ...


2

Wow! That's an impressive settings table! Even a little scary. From the looks of it, I'm assuming this is a proprietary app you can't tell us too much about. But I'll pose a few questions just the same. Is the position of a cell meaningful to the user? If it's important that they understand how a unit relates to two relational axes, the grid presentation ...


2

Yes, Nielsen Norman Group have reported on the research. Here's a summary. Yes, provide a search button for the search box For a long time, these were the unchanging research-based published guidelines (available for purchase, not free): Have an easily identifiable search box in the upper right-hand corner of the page, with an open-text field ...


2

You could use an indeterminate toggle switch, see Bootstrap Switch or Flip Toggle Switch for examples on how to do this. Then you just append the event to fire validation. As for styling, you'll notice in the examples above they use the closure principle of gestalt to communicate there's a state that needs user to complete it to avoid uncertainty. So, in ...


2

Not a full answer, but your approach #1 is wrong, as you likely guessed. Bank of America has a similar page when transferring money between accounts or to a friend's account. You pick the from account, the to account, the total amount, the date of the transfer, then hit next. Then you're on the "review everything" page. Once you click "complete transfer", ...


2

There's nothing wrong or unexpected about a dropdown opening upwards. It happens quite a lot. In fact I wouldn't be surprised if you've seen it yourself, many many times. You just don't question it because it's instinctive. If a dropdown is going to open 'below the fold' then it often opens upwards. It happens on sites like Amazon for example: So ...


2

Any rule for the specific color of the asterisk (or anything else, except for very strong conventions like a traffic light metaphor) is a red herring. When you design a form, you must know what happens to it, or what the user needs at any given moment. During the initial filling of the form, the user focuses his attention on the fields one at a time, ...


2

From what I understand, I wouldn't go an ask the user what he wants to do, because we'll assume that this is the wanted action. In such a case, you'd need to provide a draft-save; as some required fields aren't filled in yet. Due note, that a good working auto-save isn't that trivial, as you need to think about a lot more now. For instance, the biggest ...


2

At issue is not the particular color you choose but rather that you indicate to the user that the element is read-only. The UX part is telling users that this element functions differently than other elements (and of course gray is the color normally used for this purpose). Ultimately this is more of a question for your graphic designers and, by the way, ...


1

Showing disabled input fields can be useful because it indicates to the user that there are additional options or that the information can be edited in different circumstances. If there is a benefit in your particular application for the user to know that this information is editable in a certain scenario (the correct role), then you could show them as ...


1

Think of it via the form perspective. Checkboxes are commonly used to add to the existing form (ex: add me to your newsletter, remember me, etc). So in the perspective it should be "add comments to your post" where a check will enable it. Putting disable with a check is kind of contradictory: I'm "adding" a disable? Also to add to what you're asking ...


1

Possitive wording The general rule is that positive wording is better in general since it's easier to interpret and tends to be shorter which is always good in checkboxs' labels. Microsoft agrees with these in their guidelines. If it is the case of a blogpost, I think it's not a big deal, since users should later be able to delete the comments and ...


1

No toggle at first; this instead: “Please provide gender.” User clicks, sees this: “[x ] Male” User makes a choice: “[ o] Female” Like that?


1

I would also suggest you make the box red rather than green. Green gives off the feeling it is completed successfully, IMO red would imply more action is required.


1

Is there a very good reason why you are putting the confirmation page after the payment details page? Normally, one confirms their email address and shipping details, followed by the payment details (card numbers have checksums to guard against typos, negating any need for additional validation). Furthermore, most banks require some form of 2-factor ...


1

In the example you have shown, the "find your account" page is asking for different information than the login page. The log in just asks for your email address or phone number. The "forgot password" feature allows you to enter email address, phone number, name, or user name. The reason for this is that maybe the user who reaches this point has ...


1

I would think the reason is that they want you to retype your e-mail address so you definitly don't make any typos this time, to get you out of auto-pilot. Another thing, again, refers to the auto-pilot in you, is to use that action as a double confirmation that you, in fact, want to perform that action.


1

This is a long discussion. For starters, this is a mobile driven solution, and like with almost anything in "mobile first" scenarios, there's a lot of voices attacking or defending the literal translation of these mobile solutions. First of all, I'd strongly recommend you to read the why and how the floating label pattern was created, by his creator. As you ...


1

If all the information in the steps (Person; Relation; Reference; Files) is mandatory, and you are worried that there is a high risk of failure to save (timeout / system failure), then it would make more sense to make this a multi-step process, and replace 'Save' with 'Next'. Of course, you can also auto-save on opening of the next accordion, and achieve ...


1

I would like to quote here few things i have learned from book "Designing with the mind in mind Simple Guide to Understanding UI Design Guidelines" First Factor: When we are filling form fields, our eyes are focused on the current area/field of that form..What is not in our eyes current focal point is all blurry and meaningless until something moves or pops ...



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