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69

I don't have a pointer to published research - but in my experience US folk will always assume the US MM/DD/YYYY format unless they are knowingly using an non-US site, and are already aware of the potential differences. If you have to use numbers only then the format that causes least confusion across cultures in my experience is YYYY-MM-DD since it ...


61

I agree with you that the first is best. Good UX is largely about reducing the cognitive load of a user. (###) ###-#### is a format that, in North America, is unique to phone numbers, so I know as soon as I see the format that this is a phone number. At first glance, if I just see {several numbers} {hyphen} {several numbers}... well, this could be a social ...


52

Well, you can write the predicted year of death based on user research, or you can say "TBD" :). And more seriously - it would be a good idea to develop two templates for this item, one for dead presidents and another one for those who are still alive. The "alive" one shouldn't contain the "Died" field at all. The downside to this is that it may not be self-...


52

Another option would be for the text field to ignore all non-numeric characters, and display appropriate formatting automatically. For example: User enters '3' -> Text field displays '0.03' User enters '4' -> Text field displays '0.34' User enters ',' -> Text field displays '0.34' (no change) User enters '5' -> Text field displays '3.45' User ...


38

Do not update what users enter when they're still typing. It fuddles up their ability to edit as they type, and it makes the field a moving target. If you were to type 25000 straight, no typo's, no backspacing, it might make sense to format it right when you're done. However, what happens when you enter a 0 between the 2 and the 5? Or when you hit backspace? ...


34

Let's talk for a minute about user expectations and magic. A user comes to your tool with certain expectations, and not every user's expectations are the same. You're seeing this first-hand. Culture, up-bringing and life experience all shape how a user will interact with a tool, opening a vast array of expectations to potentially meet. One expectation ...


31

Single column layout you have is definitely better, but there are several other options. I'm not going to say my approach is the best. Just try to apply it to your problem and see the result. Basically, there are several ideas: enhance readability try not to mix field names and entered values optimize form length introduce some logical structure (if ...


31

Italics are a known problem for some people with dyslexia and the general advice has been to avoid italics (particularly large blocks of italic text) and instead use bold for emphasis. The British Dyslexia Association says: Avoid underlining and italics: these tend to make the text appear to run together. Use bold instead. UX Movement touches on ...


25

You can do whatever you wish basically, as long as you provide a way to verify the input. I would personally dynamically display --next to the input field-- the amount at least partially written out, like [ 123.45 ] (123 US dollars, 45 cents) [ 123,45 ] (123 US dollars, 45 cents) [ 123,456.78 ] (123 456 US dollars, 78 cents) [ 123,456 ] (123 456 ...


24

Show the user what's expected visually and show how the machine interprets the user's input. My contribution to the brainstorm would be: Use a reference to the cheque-form of the old days :) Let the computer ignore all comma's and periods that the user enters (for that matter: non-numerical characters) Show (if you're able to) an image in the background ...


21

Consistency is key here I think. So, for currency, always use two decimals and align every number to the right. It took me some time to make sense of the table you displayed in your post. I would go for something like this: tender qty amt 5.00 1 5.00 10.00 1 10.00 100.00 1 100.00 0.05 1 0.05 0.10 1 ...


20

Wikipedia is, I suppose, the ultimate in hyperlink use and has quite a strict linking style guideline for the ways in which URLs and hyperlinks are used within the text. Editors who don't conform to the style are quickly picked up - especially on more popular articles. I have to say it really does make for a pretty consistent reading experience from one ...


20

Ideally you'd let them type in the phone number in any format and you'd have client and server side logic that could parse it out. Barring that--if you're just looking for a quick fix--look at using field masking. If you're using jQuery, this is a decent one: http://digitalbush.com/projects/masked-input-plugin/#demo


19

I'll just answer for the Euro: European — €1.234.567,89 EUR Normally you'd use either the euro symbol or the 3-letter abbrevation, not both at the same time. The combination looks a bit odd, but is perfectly understandable. The style guide used by the institutions of the European Union includes rules for expressing monetary units. The most ...


17

I vote A. I read the result/s initially as result per second. Result(s) seems more natural, but I would prefer the option were you'd detect if the number is larger than 1 and change result to results. Maybe take a look here: english.stackexchange here the (s) seems to be the standard. Another option is to put it like this: Matching results: 1 With ...


16

Good question... I don't think you ever will be able to get it right, so it's better leave this responsibility to the user. You can trim spaces, of course, but you shouldn't mess with the case. The only foolproof formatting you could do, is to make everything uppercase. This might be handy for internal use, but not as a correction of the user's entry. ...


16

The study list linked to in the blog mentioned by Matt Obee is here http://dyslexiahelp.umich.edu/sites/default/files/good_fonts_for_dyslexia_study.pdf It's an interesting paper and the conclusions are worth working through: The main conclusion is that font types have an impact on readability of people with dyslexia. As they do on readability with ...


15

In my opinion, relative dates are incredibly helpful (when used correctly). A relative date, such as yesterday, two days ago, last week provides you with more information than 8/9/2011, 8/8/2011, or 8/2/2011. It not only gives you when something happened, but it tells you when something happened in my current context of now. I have done some design work ...


14

Firstly, the thousands separator is not common among all regions of the world. When in doubt the recommended solution (SI/ISO 31-0 standard) is to use a non-breakable thin space as a separator. You also have to take into account that not all countries group by thousands. From Wikipedia: In China, comma and space are used to mark digit groups ...


14

A poke around Google suggests that most guides on usage of the symbol agree with your intuition. This article emphasizes that you should use a non-breaking space to avoid the symbol and the copyright holder being on two different lines or pages. Their reasoning is as follows: Must you put a space af­ter the copy­right sym­bol? No, but se­man­ti­cal­ly, ...


14

Show all items on a single page in a vertical list This obviously has limits as it is almost never a good idea to display thousands of items at a time. Though putting a list of a hundred items on a single settings page is fine especially providing some way to quickly filter the list at the top. Chunking them into groups as you have done is a good first ...


13

I guess one can always find special cases, but in the general case, I would go with rounding the correct sum, not summing the rounded numbers. The point of rounding is to make a number easier to digest at a glance. And while we are aware that there is a tradeoff due to lost accuracy, we want to keep the accuracy loss as small as possible. If you were to ...


13

Your question seems to assume that email senders have to either remember the email address of the intended recipient, or will have to accurately reverse-engineer the email address of the intended recipient. You also seem to assume that email addresses must be of a single form company-wide. I think that the answers over-engineer a solution because they ...


12

4 digits is time-tested chunking for large numbers 3 to 4 digit chunks are easy to read accurately. Perceptually, the eye tends to read words and not letters across a page, and a 3-4 letter word allows the eye to read the end points and the middle letters of the word accurately without disorientation. Once the word gets too long, the letters in the ...


12

Highlighting is more relative than absolute Non-designers often don't realize that the style of highlighting is much less important than the relationship between the highlights and non-highlights. There are all kinds of approaches to creating highlights. One might use font-color, background-color, size, font variation (e.g. italics, underlining) and ...


12

You could create two fields - 1 for dollars and 1 for cents. In this way you don't need any formatting logic and you can strip out any non-alphanumeric characters when you save to a database.


11

First of all, you need to be consistent. You can't show the currency code for some currencies but not for others, just because they don't have a unique symbol. You also can't rely on all your users knowing the symbols. Regarding the format - maybe I'm misinterpreting your question, but it seems like you want to present each currency in the format customary ...


11

Look at how times are shown in other stopwatch applications as an indication, as they have been refined over years. The typical way that it is shown is simply as HH:MM:SS. If you're only looking for time to an accuracy of seconds and you want more than just numbers, then something like 2h 23m 12s seems clear enough without taking up lots of space. You ...


11

We had the same question and after a lot of heated discussion we decided to not format while the user was editing. While the user type he can add grouping or decimal separators if he would like and as soon as he blurs we add them if the user didn't. so the user can type 100000 100,000 100,000.00 100000.00 but as soon as he blurs we format it as 100,...


11

If you want to refer to a point in time, you need to either give the time, or give a relative time. So that translates to either something like 11:32 today or 5 hours ago. Simply stating "5 hours" tells you nothing really as it is a measurement of a duration of time and nothing more without a reference point. So don't use this. When people use forums and ...



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