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66

I don't have a pointer to published research - but in my experience US folk will always assume the US MM/DD/YYYY format unless they are knowingly using an non-US site, and are already aware of the potential differences. If you have to use numbers only then the format that causes least confusion across cultures in my experience is YYYY-MM-DD since it ...


38

Do not update what users enter when they're still typing. It fuddles up their ability to edit as they type, and it makes the field a moving target. If you were to type 25000 straight, no typo's, no backspacing, it might make sense to format it right when you're done. However, what happens when you enter a 0 between the 2 and the 5? Or when you hit backspace? ...


25

Italics are a known problem for some people with dyslexia and the general advice has been to avoid italics (particularly large blocks of italic text) and instead use bold for emphasis. The British Dyslexia Association says: Avoid underlining and italics: these tend to make the text appear to run together. Use bold instead. UX Movement touches on ...


21

Consistency is key here I think. So, for currency, always use two decimals and align every number to the right. It took me some time to make sense of the table you displayed in your post. I would go for something like this: tender qty amt 5.00 1 5.00 10.00 1 10.00 100.00 1 100.00 0.05 1 0.05 0.10 1 ...


20

Single column layout you have is definitely better, but there are several other options. I'm not going to say my approach is the best. Just try to apply it to your problem and see the result. Basically, there are several ideas: enhance readability try not to mix field names and entered values optimize form length introduce some logical structure (if ...


19

Wikipedia is, I suppose, the ultimate in hyperlink use and has quite a strict linking style guideline for the ways in which URLs and hyperlinks are used within the text. Editors who don't conform to the style are quickly picked up - especially on more popular articles. I have to say it really does make for a pretty consistent reading experience from one ...


17

I vote A. I read the result/s initially as result per second. Result(s) seems more natural, but I would prefer the option were you'd detect if the number is larger than 1 and change result to results. Maybe take a look here: english.stackexchange here the (s) seems to be the standard. Another option is to put it like this: Matching results: 1 With ...


16

In my opinion, relative dates are incredibly helpful (when used correctly). A relative date, such as yesterday, two days ago, last week provides you with more information than 8/9/2011, 8/8/2011, or 8/2/2011. It not only gives you when something happened, but it tells you when something happened in my current context of now. I have done some design work ...


16

Good question... I don't think you ever will be able to get it right, so it's better leave this responsibility to the user. You can trim spaces, of course, but you shouldn't mess with the case. The only foolproof formatting you could do, is to make everything uppercase. This might be handy for internal use, but not as a correction of the user's entry. ...


15

Ideally you'd let them type in the phone number in any format and you'd have client and server side logic that could parse it out. Barring that--if you're just looking for a quick fix--look at using field masking. If you're using jQuery, this is a decent one: http://digitalbush.com/projects/masked-input-plugin/#demo


14

Firstly, the thousands separator is not common among all regions of the world. When in doubt the recommended solution (SI/ISO 31-0 standard) is to use a non-breakable thin space as a separator. You also have to take into account that not all countries group by thousands. From Wikipedia: In China, comma and space are used to mark digit groups ...


13

I guess one can always find special cases, but in the general case, I would go with rounding the correct sum, not summing the rounded numbers. The point of rounding is to make a number easier to digest at a glance. And while we are aware that there is a tradeoff due to lost accuracy, we want to keep the accuracy loss as small as possible. If you were to ...


13

A poke around Google suggests that most guides on usage of the symbol agree with your intuition. This article emphasizes that you should use a non-breaking space to avoid the symbol and the copyright holder being on two different lines or pages. Their reasoning is as follows: Must you put a space af­ter the copy­right sym­bol? No, but se­man­ti­cal­ly, ...


12

The study list linked to in the blog mentioned by Matt Obee is here http://dyslexiahelp.umich.edu/sites/default/files/good_fonts_for_dyslexia_study.pdf It's an interesting paper and the conclusions are worth working through: The main conclusion is that font types have an impact on readability of people with dyslexia. As they do on readability with ...


11

We had the same question and after a lot of heated discussion we decided to not format while the user was editing. While the user type he can add grouping or decimal separators if he would like and as soon as he blurs we add them if the user didn't. so the user can type 100000 100,000 100,000.00 100000.00 but as soon as he blurs we format it as ...


11

If you leave out the delimiter, then you also remove all doubt related to thousand-separator vs comma separator. Many countries use comma as decimal separator, so "10,000" could be interpreted as "10 comma 000". I believe it depends on the circumstances. In general, the delimiter would increase readability, but sometimes the actual, exact number isn't ...


10

The question you need to ask is: Will enabling pasting of rich text add value to my application? Will it add more users? Will it help retain users? Will it make them more productive? etc. If the answer is "yes" then you need to weigh that against the cost - which in this case is the effort required to sanitise the input and the cost of not sanitising ...


10

If you want to refer to a point in time, you need to either give the time, or give a relative time. So that translates to either something like 11:32 today or 5 hours ago. Simply stating "5 hours" tells you nothing really as it is a measurement of a duration of time and nothing more without a reference point. So don't use this. When people use forums and ...


9

There are a couple possible reasons: Security - Parsing BBCode and turning it into HTML can often be easier than trying to sanitize and secure the HTML. The security risk of missing a vulnerability can be high. Ease of Use - Some formatting languages, like Markdown, are less verbose than HTML. That said, Markdown is also less descriptive than HTML, so ...


9

Look at how times are shown in other stopwatch applications as an indication, as they have been refined over years. The typical way that it is shown is simply as HH:MM:SS. If you're only looking for time to an accuracy of seconds and you want more than just numbers, then something like 2h 23m 12s seems clear enough without taking up lots of space. You ...


9

Your linked article is talking about the relationshiop between labels and input fields. The use case is in there is read, think, type. Input, process, output. And during output (typing) a user may want to revisit reading and label-on-top-of-input facilitates that. The use case of the information you are presenting is read, read. Or maybe simply read. ...


9

Single column layouts are better because: They are more streamlined. Inline suggestions can be provided if needed. The labels are more scan-friendly. They make the user think less by providing a definite order to fill up the form. Remember, the user always says: "don't make me think!"


9

It's ok to make 123 into 123.00 as it makes no difference It's ok to make 123.4 into 123.40 as it makes no difference It's not ok to do anything if the user enters 123.456 The chances are high that the user made a typo. Did they mean 123.45 123.46 123.56 1234.56 Only the user knows what they meant to type. And in that case, you need to highlight ...


8

From the author's point of view, text links are better. They encode the association between the URL and the text. <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hypertext">Hypertext</a> is cool. (Of course, authors don't need to worry about the intricacies of HTML. The above code can be produced through a WYSIWYG editor, Markdown, etc.) How to ...


8

Short Answer: ITU-T E.123 (PDF) will give you an idea of how to format international numbers Libphonenumber from Google will actually do the formatting for you (demo here) Slightly longer answer: Ideally, phone numbers should be displayed in a format easily readable by humans and recognizable as a phone number by devices. Further, the number should ...


8

Jørn's answer is pretty complete. Just to support it, and add a bit: It is easier to read numbers with delimiters - significants and scale are easily recognised that way. In the printed publishing world the delimiter ambiguity is solved by the use a half space character as a delimiter; on the web the same is known as thin space (&thinsp;). Like so: ...


7

First of all, you need to be consistent. You can't show the currency code for some currencies but not for others, just because they don't have a unique symbol. You also can't rely on all your users knowing the symbols. Regarding the format - maybe I'm misinterpreting your question, but it seems like you want to present each currency in the format customary ...


7

If you are asking this question for a pixel perfect mockup, you can skip the following paragraph. Otherwise, you MUST read it: Except for pixel-perfect mockups, you should not create images for your textual buttons to use in production, especially given the power of CSS for web or styling for desktop/mobile/any other target platform. Because it would make ...


7

Back to the question where the answer is yes, it improves readability, at least if you listen to Jakob Nielsen who (yet again) wrote an article on 113 Design Guidelines for Homepage Usability where #112 says: 112) Use a thousands separator appropriate to your locale for numbers that have five or more digits. For example, in the United States, fifty-three ...



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