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14

I must say that it is a design decision I like to go with in most projects. Regardless of the SEO benefits, having full navigation available in a consistent area of the site, always within reach of the user regardless of where they are in the site is certainly a benefit. It shouldn't replace standard navigation methods, but compliment them. I do not believe ...


13

A poke around Google suggests that most guides on usage of the symbol agree with your intuition. This article emphasizes that you should use a non-breaking space to avoid the symbol and the copyright holder being on two different lines or pages. Their reasoning is as follows: Must you put a space af­ter the copy­right sym­bol? No, but se­man­ti­cal­ly, ...


9

As you say, this is a new development, so I think there will be a while before people really get into the right way of doing it. There are two answers that I can see: Have a permanant fixed footer at the bottom of the currently displayed screen, which scrolls as you do. However, I think that there needs to be improvements in the technology to make this ...


8

It's because the page content is typically on a light background. The dark footer clearly visually delineates the 'page content' from the 'site footer' area using contrast.


6

It is a mistake. They should have used a non-breaking space between 'user' and 'experience'. In HTML it is represented as   or  . I also looked at that and saw "user", and if it weren't for your red arrow, I wouldn't have seen the "experience" part of that, which is clearly not their intention.


5

The increasing prevalence of such footers implies that there must be some research supporting their use, but I haven't yet encountered any. Have you? I think you're placing too much emphasis on the role of research as a driver of design principles. I would say that these things emerge from designer intuition, and proliferate if they don't cause serious ...


5

I think footers are to be avoided at the bottom of infinitely scrolling content, with one caveat which I'll get to at the bottom... The user is scrolling down for one reason - to look at more content. Footer information just keeps on getting in the way of that primary goal. Klout tries to keep a footer on all pages - including on those pages with infinite ...


4

While mega footers are generally beneficial to the users, in some specific cases they can be inefficient. For example, in a big financial web application project, I've seen usability test participants scan thorougly the footer to get help for the actual page and look for related information (which a high-level sitemap cannot provide). Although these can be ...


4

What you are asking about isn't "opacity" (although it looks like a reduced opacity text on a white background). It is actually a function of contrast. In photography and visual design, one of the fundamental ideas is that things with strong contrast draw attention. Things with weak contrast are easier to ignore. It takes less cognitive effort to focus ...


4

Have you tried prototyping? I know that may sound silly at this stage, but I ask for a legitimate question. In situations like you are describing there isn't going to be a piece of research that is going to answer you question as easily spending an hour or two doing some hallway testing. If you have critical user functions that are only located in the ...


4

Taking Mailchimp as an example - although it is a big and successful company, its main goal is selling its service and as such the top navigation is focused on this. about us, news, careers, etc. are not as important so they are placed in the footer. This works for the type of company Mailchimp is but mightn't necessarily be suitable for a larger company ...


3

Sam's answer is pretty spot on about the need to keep them seperate since there are multiple use cases where a person might just want to contact you but might not be interested in newsletter and vice versa where a person might want to subscribe to your newsletter but not reach out to you. My recommendation would be to keep both of them seperate though you ...


3

I've never seen the sign without a space after it, but anyway, in the chapter on copyrights, the Oxford Guide to Style has a space after the symbol. It is perhaps worth mentioning that the symbol is not a requirement, nor does it have any legal significance. Legacy has it that it is used to denote a copyrighted material.


3

Looking at the site, I suspect the breadcrumbs are not to aid the navigation at the top but to give the user an idea of where he is in the site when he scrolls all the way down to the footer which is pretty large and does take up quite a bit of space below it thus taking up the whole screen space and might confuse the user about where he is in the site. ...


3

It clearly indicates the law of closure or the way a site gets binded up well with a darker patch at the bottom. This is really against a contrasting color that the black works. The footer is a great area also to unearth some of the information/link that we do not find somewhere else. So keeping a distinct color such as black, always a design decision but ...


2

It does seem a little redundant having the breadcrumb so far down the page. Maybe it is just a question of priority? Apple decided there were already plenty of clues for the user to understand where they were, that the breadcrumb could be relegated down the page. This pushes the content further up the page and "closer" to the user. Potentially there could ...


2

From an aesthetic perspective, the dark mega footer "closes" the dark header. This way the content on the light background is sandwiched between two dark elements. This reuses the design language introduced in the header to draw attention again to the footer.


2

The usability of the copyright can be co-related to the fact that it sends a sense of authenticity to the users. If we don't see any such message, we tend to be suspicious. So, I can say over a time, our mental model has become like that and trust the site (one of the factors of many) when see copyright stuff


2

According to Wikipedia copyright is: Generally, it is "the right to copy", but also gives the copyright holder the right to be credited for the work, to determine who may adapt the work to other forms, who may perform the work, who may financially benefit from it, and other related rights. It is an intellectual property form (like the patent, the ...


2

I think you've answered your own question... Following & Sharing are two distinct actions applied to two different things. When you're following, you're following a brand or a site as a whole. When you're sharing, you're sharing a specific bit of content. Which one are you trying to do? Or are you trying to do both? It's okay to have both Follow link ...


2

There are many websites using a 'side only' panel for navigation and brand information. Usually the logo and branding are simply positioned at the top of the side panel. It seems to be fairly common in wordpress themes. An example is: http://felixplus.com/demo/mediastar/wp/light/ Standard branding info would fit within the top or bottom of the panel in a ...


2

To add items: Consider a slide-in menu for it, for example: slide from the right edge of the screen to the center, and you'll get a menu on the side with relevant options. Suggest a side menu by having a fitting graphic displayed on the center right. Remember it will be displayed on top of the list, so you should not have any issues with smaller form ...


1

In this case, I think that it really depends on how often the actions items are used. If they are not used that often, I'm not sure you need to worry about a sticky footer. Another consideration would be the browser chrome. There is usually a footer for the browser itself. With this in mind, sticking anything to the bottom becomes problematic for two ...


1

Why not use a reductive approach? What is more important, the e-mail signup form or feedback? Nowadays feedback can be triggered in a number of ways, having both in the footer can confuse (the objective), otherwise conduct A/B testing to see which solution is better.


1

In general, I think you want these to be separate UI because they're distinct use cases. One case is "I want to tell you something", while the other is "I want you to tell me something". That said, you could try and do something clever: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups You could even save the email + name in the ...


1

The footer doesn't have a breadcrumb so much as a mini site map. This is usually done for SEO purposes, and since their menu uses JS-driven drop downs, may not be as easily spidered (like the constantly persistent text links in the footer are)


1

Some website uses footer navigation to solve SEO issue on Global Navigation , for example : BBC.com, their global navigation is not working when you disable JavaScript and they use footer navigation to solve this issue.



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