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You are asking for an exhaustive classification of typefaces into a taxonomy based on all sorts of variables. Alas, it doesn't exist--mainly because it's not really possible. Typefaces just don't fit into simple classifications easily. There's just too much subjectivity and, ultimately, context that will play a part in most of these factors. I think the ...


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I think Fontbook should suit your requirements. It covers nearly 37,000 typefaces and every typeface has details about era, foundry, usage, designer, library, release date, number of sub families, font weights, glyphs per font, and trademark. It's a really well organized app. More about the app here.


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I have some paper font catalogs which could be used as such (eg. Creative Type ) , but also you can find such online, eg. http://www.100besttypefaces.com Also, both MyFonts.com and Fonts.com, but even FontShop tries to provide such information next to their typefaces.


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My suggestions: 1) Do what Peter said (make all styling the same apart from link) 2) Reword the link to focus to the value to the customer, or what they will accomplish, rather than focusing on what you want them to do. Just as a quick example (link shown in bold text): "Commit to our StackExchange proposal, and help us establish an Arts & Crafts ...


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Firstly, the location of the signature is in what I sometimes call the 'suicide slot' - bottom right of most pages is an area people ignore (based on eye tracking heatmaps). It's partly an aesthetic judgement, but there's too much going on visually here for me. I would consider making everything in the same style apart from the link - the link will stand out ...


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Highlighting is more relative than absolute Non-designers often don't realize that the style of highlighting is much less important than the relationship between the highlights and non-highlights. There are all kinds of approaches to creating highlights. One might use font-color, background-color, size, font variation (e.g. italics, underlining) and ...


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Use bold and italics to emphasize and colour to embody a feeling. When deciding when to use bold-italics-colour I tend to wield following guidelines: Emphasis, general: limit the use of bold and italics to the strict minimum as the added attention demand raises the cognitive load. If everything is emphasized, nothing is emphasized. Bold or italics. Always ...


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First and foremost; highlighting text should be used sparsely. Otherwise it gets to be noise making it hard for the user to get what you’re trying to communicate. Christian Holst who wrote the article Scannability: How to Highlight Text on the Web says 10% highlighting is the maximum, but I think that’s pushing the limit. Here “less is more” applies. ...


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1. Are objective reasons that would make this font choice sub-optimal in terms of user experience? This is pulled from the Web Accessibility in Mind website: "Trebuchet is an attractive font, but it has subtle curved embellishments that may decrease overall readability for long passages of text. The curve at the bottom of the lower-case "L" helps to ...


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Our company built a fairly complex SaaS web app for project management. Until the recent redesign, we've been using MS Trebuchet for displaying content within data grids. Trebuchet isn't a "pretty" modern web font, however it does one thing very well which is to offer crisp legible text across platforms (Windows, Macs) for small font sizes. Suppose you ...


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If all your users use Windows systems (this includes phones and tablets) you're good to go. Otherwise, you should provide a fallback font for other systems that don't have this font available.



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