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7

There are 2 ways of advancing in a given field: incrementally or by a breakthrough. Focus groups will only give you the incremental kind. A creative expert is required to invent a new type of whatever. I think that people that really master their field, get a 6th sense of what is going to work, and only need user testing to justify their work to bosses or ...


4

Wow - this looks really nice. You've done your homework well, I can tell you that. However there is only one step I think you need to think through more. And it's this one: Step 6.) Seemingly endless development process... Depending on resources and scope, this step can be all from one week to 1½ years. And letting your focus group wait 1½ years ...


4

Here's what I've done: Gather stories that can become requirements for improving your service Review your personas with them to verify they are accurate Conduct participatory design sessions where you actually work through design concepts on paper or with prototypes with them (see Righi's 3x3 or Dayton's Bridge) Discuss your research findings with them ...


4

Source Article “It’s not about pop culture, and it’s not about fooling people, and it’s not about convincing people that they want something they don’t. We figure out what we want. And I think we’re pretty good at having the right discipline to think through whether a lot of other people are going to want it, too. That’s what we get paid to do.” - Steve ...


3

It depends on whether the various stakeholders have contrary interests (e.g. environmentalists and fracking companies), and on whether there would be a likely overlap between their areas of interest. Having a broader more diverse group will generally give more insightful results, but is also harder to manage in terms of conflict and even representation. If ...


3

The answer is:both. Before: The users speak the language of the UI: therefore, any requirement they have, any change request they ask for can only be in the language of the UI, in the language of the user interface. If a user asks for adding a new method to a class, (s)he knows too much, and usually it's not how the system is actually written, but what ...


3

Depending on the size of the group, it can be hard to engage with them all at once without it turning into a shouting match. However, there are a few ways to get some good feedback: Talk to the thought leaders in the group. Someone (Or a few someones) is probably organizing and running these events, or is at least a very active participant. This is a good ...


2

I think it's just a matter of making sure one isn't designing around user opinions. Instead design around all the other factors involved...user's tasks, their behaviors, user testing results, business objectives, best practices, etc. We do know what people want: a user experience that isn't annoying. ;)


2

In homogenous focus groups it can be easier to create an atmosphere where everyone feels comfortable and free to speak out, without having to defend their points of view against others. The main focus is on shared experiences, which is why this type of group is more popular if you are trying to get results that are representative for your users. In a ...


1

As @JohnGB notes, it depends. A 2011 UXMatters article "Do’s and Don’ts for Focus Groups" has a paragraph entitled "Don’t Recruit Participants Who Are Too Similar or Too Different", which reinforces @JohnGB's advice. The article also states that: ...it’s important to ensure that participants aren’t too similar for you to acquire a variety of ...


1

You're asking about two things: recruiting and incentives. How you recruit depends on a lot of things. I once worked at a university that had a website where researchers posted studies and people signed up for them. Piece of cake. If you have a list of local customers you can send a set of people an email asking if they're interested. You could recruit from ...


1

Doing user testing properly is potentially quite an expensive business as you want representative users of your website, and you want to try to balance user demographics. If the target market has a wide user demographic then testing it on 5 people isn't really enough ( it will find some of the problems but it won't find the majority of them ). ( The 'magic ...


1

What are you trying to get out of interviewing those people? Personas should be based on qualitative and quantitative user research. Quantitative studies (aiming at statistics, not insights): Test at least 20 users to get statistically significant numbers; tight confidence intervals require even more users. Three groups of 4-5 people (max total of 15) ...


1

If you can actually get the users to quickly perform specific tasks rather than doing a demo that would be be helpful as you can observe their reactions and user flow and define what are the usability concerns. If that's not feasible, One approach you can do is to define what are the different user flows you want to evaluate (it would be good if you can ...


1

I'd say that it all depends on what you mean by focus group. If you're going to sit down with your users and ask them what they think, and what they want, I would not give this too much of your energy. If users tell you it's wrong they are almost always right, but if users tell you what's wrong and what should change, they are almost always wrong (to ...


1

There are several implications for putting different stakeholders in one group, most of the time there is a hierarchy, so you will end up with one/two stakeholders running the meeting and presenting their point of view. Putting them in different groups will allow a better conversation with each of them. This way you will be able to find out what all of them ...


1

Essentially my role, is to give the ok to completed wireframes I'm not a fan of this approach, though it's common. Though it also varies as to what we mean by 'ok'. If it's merely to say "the wireframes are OK, now let's finish the UX process" then that's fine. However, all-to-often I see it treated as a "the wireframes are OK, UX is done, now ...


1

Jakob Nielsen recently wrote a good article about what is the most useful usability activity http://www.useit.com/alertbox/field-study-vs-user-test.html. Ideally, you do both a user study before any wireframes are created (to understand what users need and what mental model is) and also usability studies with the wireframes (to see if design supports user ...


1

What is the topic for the focus group? There are several scenarios where mixed gender groups would probably not be a good idea: If the topic is uncomfortable to discuss in the presence of the opposite gender If the topic is likely to cause debate between genders (sometimes divergent thinking is good, but usually debate is counter-productive and tangential) ...



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