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20

I usually get both eager and upset everytime I stuble upon advanced UX topics, like Fitts' law. Eager because I find the basic research very interesting, and upset because there are so many misinterpretations of these. I actually have my own version Fitts' law: Don't use Fitts' law as a formula, use it as a guideline. So, what is the simple ...


16

One solution is to show a magnified version directly above where the user is currently hovering. Look at how YouTube deals with seeking long videos, for example: This allows the user to select a rough time period they are interested in, then make a finer selection using the shorter-interval magnification. The Music app on the iPhone/iPod has a feature ...


9

In Designing Gestural Interfaces, Dan Saffer touches (!) the subject of Fitts' Law in relation to touchscreens (specifically pp. 40-2.) Saffer argues that the law holds true for gestural interfaces; minimize reaching across the interface and making sure that targets are appropriately sized to accommodate the "cursor" (i.e., the finger.) However, he also ...


7

Even if a user is an expert, Fitts' law applies. Fitts' law doesn't refer to finding/identifying the target so much as how long it takes to hit it. Even after a user has developed muscle and spatial memory for where to move the cursor, a larger target that's closer to the cursor is still going to be quicker to hit than a smaller one further away (if only ...


6

As you can see on its wikipedia page, Fitts Law goes well beyond 2D movement (and HCI in general). What's known as Fitts Law originates from a (military) memorandum written by P.M Fitts in 1947 (warning: pdf link) that deals with ergonomics of WW2 airplane cockpits, and how the layout of instruments, their scales and the directions of their indicators may ...


5

Do the objects have to be that small ? For instance you can use lines instead of dots and show more information when hoover. The area of selection gets way bigger since it does not depend on Y and X axis but on X only.


4

There are two different parts to your question. The first is whether it's more efficient to disable controls in inactive windows. I'd suggest that it isn't, because disabling a control means that it has no content worth the users attention - disable != readonly. In most cases a background window does have content the user may want to reference, concealing ...


3

Fitts's Law is the thing you want to test. Fitts's law (often cited as Fitts' law) is a model of human movement primarily used in human–computer interaction and ergonomics that predicts that the time required to rapidly move to a target area is a function of the distance to the target and the size of the target. Fitts's law is used to model the act of ...


2

Let the user select a container box. Then system should make the first object in that box as current object and highlight it (as we do highlight current list item). User should be able to move through the objects using left arrow and right arrow keys of keyboard or by clicking on the arrow buttons provided on either side of the selected container box. ...


2

The issue is no longer clickability, as you no longer know whether someone will be accessing your website / service from a pc or a touch device. So you need to choose the size based on touch device usability, and then it will work well for both. I generally follow the Android HIG which states that you should aim for a smallest clickable object size ...


2

When it comes to touch UIs I have heard 40-45 points squared or the equivalent size of a finger on a surface is a good idea. You could take a look at this discussion. If you trust Apple to tell you what to do, this article has an answer to your question: The comfortable minimum size of tappable UI elements is 44 x 44 points.


1

Leaving space between the active areas reduces the chance of launching the wrong app. Though it also reduces the chances of launching the right app, the trade-off is worth it, especially when you consider the costs associated with not launching the right app on the first press (just try again a split-second later) and the costs associated with launching ...


1

Great question (especially the part about accidentally clicking on an action button when selecting the inactive window). I think it makes sense to disable/grey-out the inactive windows (the ones that are not currently receiving the user's input (mouse, keyboard and most importantly, attention) ONLY if they are overlapping each other even if it's just by a ...


1

These extensions of Fitts' Law fit better to touch screens that the original 1D point'n'click task: Law of Crossing: Crossing a target of width W at distance D with your pen or finger to trigger an action follows the same rule as the original setup of Fitts. [Accot & Zhai, More than dotting the i's - foundations for crossing-based interfaces, ...


1

psychology the right side is perceived as rational, while left as more emotional/creative and sensitive. interaction you describe ideal model according to the Fitt's law at which the value of interaction aspires to infinity (an interaction element at single monitor corner). Fitt's Law Fitt's Law demonstration ux. I use for a long time two monitors for ...



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