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53

broken? "If not even the spelling is correct, how can I trust this works correctly?" This is especially troublesome for web sites that want to hold private data. I might not even want to give you my e-mail. dead? When obvious errors remain online for a long time, this suggests that you don't care to fix them (lack of respect) you are technically ...


22

Yes this will leave a bad impression. And remember, first impressions are very important. I would get this corrected as soon as possible. Not only will it make the site/company look unprofessional, but it will be difficult to understand. No offense intended, but I actually had to read this question a couple times to fully understand what you were saying ...


21

Spelling mistakes can have quite a large impact on your site's visitors. A quote from the Stanford Guidelines for Web Credibility Typographical errors and broken links hurt a site's credibility more than most people imagine. It's also important to keep your site up and running. Typos make your site look amateurish, just like broken links or unavailable ...


10

There's a few studies that show sub-conscious reactions to the aesthetics of a page are made within 50ms, and that these reactions then impinge on the user's sense of usability, satisfaction, and the credibility of the site. Attention web designers: You have 50 milliseconds to make a good first impression! (PDF), Lindgaard G., Fernandes G. J., Dudek C. ...


9

Abdul, there is one other thing to be aware of. There are many established websites with high visitor counts that contain spelling and grammatical errors - but a spelling mistake on those sites is different from a spelling mistake on other sites (such as yours). When your site is established and well-respected (like BBC News) typos are bad, but users will ...


9

I learned a lot from Realm of the Mad God, a web-based MMO game that was recently released. The key takeaway was that they looked at other MMOs in the market, such as World of Warcraft, and identified barriers to entry/play. They then systematically removed them. For instance: No sign up. Click "play" and you're automatically given a mage and put into the ...


6

The press-and-hold (or long press) gesture on a mobile devices mimic the secondary button press on a computer mouse. It is supposed to give you the same alternative options as the secondary mouse click on a computer (even on Apple devices). From a UX perspective this behavior is kind of odd, since there are no clues that the long press exist on an object, ...


6

I think Apple's guidelines suggest to minimize the number of those intro screens (preferably not have any), hence users have come to expect not many (if any) startup/setup screens. You should definitely let users get into the app as soon as possible. From Apple's iOS UX guidelines: Avoid asking people to supply setup information. Instead, follow these ...


5

I'd agree with AndroidHustle. Using the blank slate as a tutorial seems like a really good idea. Basecamp is an example that does this really well. It isn't just demo data, but a way to help the user create their own. There's a blog on their work (with examples) here.


4

Spell Check is never something to rely upon completely. I have a client who mentioned the vast array of products in their "whorehouses". It was spelled correctly, but not exactly accurate.


4

I've seen this being used, and I think it's a good strategy to display to the user how the application is supposed to be used, As long as you make it totally clear that it is fictive data. You want the user to get a quick look at what the application will do, but don't make the entries credible to a point where they're hard to distinguish from the real ...


4

The point to keep in mind in those circumstances is that, yes, the user gets annoyed by unasked stuff when his intention is to start 'playing' with the app. Your purposes are good, that means that the sequence of screens you are showing is aimed at helping the user and not for commercial goals. But still you are somehow constraining the movements of the ...


4

Add a start form, a place search box, and a list of previous searches made by the current user (under the search box). I think that many people do the same searches every day. A summary statistics page would be a nice solution. It’s very interesting to know some numbers and performance stats.


3

I think the point is that this gesture is unobtrusive. It doesn't take up UI real estate or complicate the interface. Because there is general problem with discoverability (if that's a word) as there is no visual cue, it's best served for less frequent actions. Once a user learns this, it's like learning the right click. They never forget it and use it when ...


3

Sugar CRM is a good example of this. On installation it asks if you want demo data or a clean slate. Demo date is fictitious and just shows how elements and patterns use the data. I would recommend giving users the choice and a quick and obvious way to remove the demo data.


3

Don't put your price inside the interaction point. If I am looking for a price then buttons are perceived as grey matter. I don't expect to find the answer there. I'm looking for specific visual clues: a dollar sign ($), the words "price" or "for only", a number with .99 after it. I can appreciate wanting to be tasteful, but your primary goal is ...


3

It depends on the target audience. For Squarespace, it makes perfect sense for them to focus on a more visual/audio experience since that's their target demographic (artists, musicians, etc.). The page can be better utilized if it's designed to guide the user towards relevant information. This doesn't mean cramming everything into the top 600 pixels but ...


2

From the very useful reading list which Apple used to provide with their developer guide (takes a while to load up from the wayback machine). Obviously the use of icons (& psychology of them) predates their usage on computers: ( Whether these publications are still available is another matter ! ) Icons and Symbols Diethelm, Walter. Signet ...


2

The use of icons is a fairly discussed issue here on UX.SE. I would suggest you read the answer from Michael Zuschlag in this post where he breaks down the problem very thoroughly. Not having any scientific data to back me up I would still say that there are cases when the use of icons are much more usable than descriptive text. And I'm not talking about ...


2

I'm unsure about forcing user to do a tour. There are plenty of other methods to improve discoverability. However there is no doubt that tours are valuable. If you are doing it I would suggest a design like Twitter's. This is a 60 second tour for all new accounts. The design of the tour itself is also excellent. It provides good progress information and ...


2

I don't know if this is best practice or not, but I actually find a lot of video games—almost all of which have unique interfaces—tend to force a guided tour the very first time you interact with something new. Perhaps you could create a guided tour that limits interactions to specifically-planned, sequential points. Maybe even dim irrelevant interaction ...


2

You should let users sign up through whatever means they come to your service. Any impediment to their current inclination to sign up is a further chance that they just won't do it at all. Once they've signed up, let them know how else they can access the service. On the web, tell them they can download the desktop and mobile apps and give download links; ...


2

Think of it this way. It takes years of highly specialized training to become a qualified developer, but even school students are required to be able (and many are actually able) to write correctly. So writing correctly is cheaper than developing complex technical stuff like a web site. If even one of the cheapest parts can't be done right how can users not ...


2

Looks like you are using coach marks in the context of a walkthrough. Check out walkthrough patterns that use pagination dots to indicate that there are additional pages. A good example is Facebook Paper for iPhone.


2

I think not just for the first time. For every time you can have a wallpaper or big bold text giving a hint of the application. 1. With wallpaper Example. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups But the Google search page is the best example. 2. Without Wallpaper In case you don't want Wallpaper: Try this with a ...


2

In addition to stats, a list of recently worked on items or previous searches can fill the void and provide a useful set of links to assist users in (re)finding items.


1

I've read other answers of @Pasha and @Dominik and I feel there are some things missing and some things well mentioned so I'll combine the points and add my own: I think there is no need of "edit exercise" tab if it does not offer anything apart from editing the content of step 2 i.e. "Select exercise" -- Put a edit button there itself Add an "x" close ...


1

I would suggest the following: Make tabs for future steps disabled before they get visited via "Continue =>". That is, you don't want the user to jump directly to step 4 skipping the first steps. So give a visual feedback that those steps are not accessible yet. Add an "x" close button in the top right corner -- otherwise how could I cancel from step 2? ...


1

The interface looks great, I would just suggest two things: rethink the fields and reduce them if necessary. Maybe the 'Edit Exercises' step could be even excluded from this wizard to make it more simple? Possibility of such adjustments could be just indicated by saying "You will be able to modify exercises later". I would move the "Customize Workout" step ...


1

Claiming someone as an author rather than a contributor of something carries the understanding that they did a majority of the work (or at least a significant chunk of it). In the short term, giving contributors author status may have the desired effect, but in the long term it will most likely cause more problems as you over reward contributors for ...



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