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40

Chrome does the same thing: There are two reasons for this: It makes it hard to click close on accident. This is easiest to note on the Chrome example, if every one of those super teeny tabs had an X, it would be extremely difficult to select a tab without closing it. Prefer safe actions. If you have a safe action and a risky action, the risky action ...


10

Jennifer Morrow (part of the Firefox user experience design team) wrote a pretty detailed blog post about removing the Firefox status bar in 2010. As already mentioned, the aim was to remove the unnecessary "chrome" from the Firefox UI. I'd recommend you read the whole post. A short extract: The goal is to find places where chrome can be minimized, both ...


9

Maybe, maybe not, but it is not "bad" because it violates a "rule". Rules don't always work in all situations. One of the main reasons designers exist is to decide when rules ought to be broken, or what rules are useful in a given scenario. For instance, there are (at least) two general "rules" (I prefer the terms guidelines or patterns, for the record) ...


6

It's actually not a scroll bar. It's an indicator to show which of the tabs are currently visible in the browser tab bar. The ones in the list outside the grey indicator are also outside the tab bar in the browser. It's there to make it easier for users to orientate and look among the tabs that are currently not shown in the browser. Try and use the < ...


5

Having the [x] appear at all times takes away from available screen real estate. Note that when active, the SOF tab can only show Newest '..., but when I'm on another tab, I get just enough more context to know which "Newest"... (Newest 'wpf' Questions) Edit (to respond to Golden Rules) shortcut accessibility -> Ctrl + w Also, this helps solve #5 ...


3

What purpose would a tabless instance of Firefox serve? All the browser's controls bar ones relating to opening files/tabs are modal with reference to the currently selected tab, so the only action possible at that point would be to open a tab in order to do something else. Given that, the decision to remove the option to close the last tab is probably one ...


3

Chrome was a major change in browsers. The major change it brought was screen space. Where IE and FF came from desktop apps and windows Chrome removed a significant amount of the 'Chrome' surrounding the window. The only thing it cared about was getting as much of the Web page displayed as possible. Chrome was backed by Google and achieving massive growth ...


1

While some changes (for example making the whole UI take up less vertical space) indeed look like they copy Chrome, it is a trend almost all browsers followed. However, it is in face changed user hardware, namely the growing predominance of widescreen displays and the consequent higher importance of vertical screen space, that induced this change - Chrome ...


1

A change in the UX is not necessarily bad; good designers think about not only their existing user base but also their business strategy and new users who they want to attract. Their decision process would probably have considered the possible inconvenience to their existing user base weighed against the increase in usability for new users. A number of the ...


1

Firefox 2.0 introduced a number of refinements to its tabbed browsing UI. Among them was the addition of close buttons on tabs. The browser.tabs.closeButtons preference on about:config controls how they can be displayed on tabs. Possible values and their effects: 0 - Display a close button on the active tab only 1 - Display close buttons on all tabs ...



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