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137

When we’re dealing with Banking and money transfer, it is an exceptionally bad idea. Finance isn’t supposed to be funny, since it’s a very serious business. Instead, error messages should be clear and to the point what is actually wrong, and not some random fun message. When a user receives an error message, she/he is already under pressure, since users ...


39

I would say that you can make the error messages more personal and "human sounding" without resorting to trying to be funny. For example, a message that says "Error processing transaction" can be translated to "We are very sorry, but something went wrong." "We are very sorry, but something went wrong and we did not send this transaction." They key ...


25

There are a number of reasons: It prevents someone causing someone elses account to be locked maliciously (if I know your email address and you bank with Barclays I can lock you out of your account by repeatedly attempting wrong passwords). As @AlexFritz indicated it makes it harder to try hacked username and password combinations from other sites on the ...


16

I can speak from the bank accounts I know in europe: You don't even need an email address to have an online banking account, as registration usually happens offline - you get Pin and everything via postal mail. Since you don't need an email to use the account, it does not make sense to use email as username.


11

"Funny" error messages in a serious (very serious!) application are likely to come across as tone-deaf at best. Also, bear in mind that an error message might be seen repeatedly. No joke is still funny when you hear it five times in succession and being presented repeatedly with the same attempt at a joke is like being stuck with any person who won't behave ...


8

I would most definitely discourage doing this and apart from the reason already mentioned by Benny, one must always consider the overall personality of brand you represent. An average user has a certain expectations from the kind of application he is using. The definition of user experience is different for him in different types of applications and banking ...


8

Definitely do not use the "currency symbol" that you linked. As you said, people are not going to recognize it. The best solution would be to add localization to your site/product/service. Other than that, I think it's opinion. Mine is: $ trumps € anywhere else but in Europe, and even in Europe, I don't think it matters that much, I've never heard anybody ...


8

First of all, you need to be consistent. You can't show the currency code for some currencies but not for others, just because they don't have a unique symbol. You also can't rely on all your users knowing the symbols. Regarding the format - maybe I'm misinterpreting your question, but it seems like you want to present each currency in the format customary ...


7

Without a more concrete example, let me just say... I suggest you tread lightly. This can be very dangerous. Consider a single mother of three at the end of the week struggling to make ends meet. As she goes to pay her last bill she gets the following "funny" error message. Whoops! I think you put in the wrong number, because that's more money than ...


6

I'll just answer for the Euro: European — €1.234.567,89 EUR Normally you'd use either the euro symbol or the 3-letter abbrevation, not both at the same time. The combination looks a bit odd, but is perfectly understandable. The style guide used by the institutions of the European Union includes rules for expressing monetary units. The most ...


5

In my primary dayjob such projects are usual. And they are really the mess, and the experience is worth a book :) But I'll try to be short. At first accept in your mind that huge projects can't be perfect when you are alone warrior strugling. This will save your spirit from depression and months of nightmares with ugly controls and prototypes (I had). But ...


5

If localization isn't a possibility, it's probably best to view the question through the context of your likely users. If your app targets a geographical region it's a no-brainer to use the local currency symbol. If you have to keep it general, I'd go with the $ symbol. US dollars are the most-traded and likely most recognizable currency. You also get ...


5

Alright, I'll chime in. Here's the thing. "Funny" has no place in a financial application. It just doesn't. There's nothing funny about finances when there aren't any errors. There dang sure isn't anything funny about finances when there are errors. So what about informal? Can anybody give me an example of an informal statement that is as unambiguously ...


4

The reason that currency is normally right-aligned has to do with scanability. It's normal to right-align any numerical data that is going to be scanned in a column. This is so that when you scan visually down the page, you're always comparing the same digits in each number. If they're left-alighed you get this problem: 1111 12222 166666 If you scan ...


4

I can't speak for other countries, but your presentation format for GBP is wrong - the group separator is the comma and the fractional separator is a full stop i.e. £1.234.567,89 - wrong £1,234,567.89 - correct Actually, the page you linked to does show the UK presentation format correctly.


4

Additionally, I would pose the following hypothetical: "Would you want your branch staff to speak in such a way to your customers?" I have worked in finance as a UX Designer for quite some time now. I would also suggest you go observe the way the best staff members interact with their customers. That is the tone you want to set. Also the language and tone ...


3

Depending on the country, in Europe we use the symbol € on the right, like this: 3.000,00 € For example in Spain, Germany and France it goes usually on the right but in Italy goes on the left.


2

I would recommend having the currency symbol outside the field - it looks a bit cluttered having the symbol inside the fields. Also, having symbols appear and disappear is adding unnecessary code and complexity to your site. If you like, you can make the currency symbol: A - part of the label, as you have done with the "APR (%)" label or, B - have all the ...


2

Before you start to work on a solution, you need to fully understand the system and truly what the issues are. There will be users with years of experience it would be worth getting their input. I would take some time to immerse yourself in the program. Perhaps get someone to give you some scenarios? I would recommend you create a survey which a large ...


2

At least in Germany, the normal separator is a space: € 1 234 567,89. (Make sure to use a non-breaking space, though: nbsp;). However, 1.234,00 is perfectly understable, while 1.234 would be confusing. Sources: Wikipedia uses ' or (space) for Switzerland/Liechtenstein (not Germany) ISO 1000 (SI system used in physics) recommends to use either , or . ...


2

My experience from local government, where money was involved, is that user-names provide another level of security beyond an email address. It was the generally held opinion that someone could relate an email address to an individual but a user-name could be unique to that site. It's a fairly arbitrary measure, but it's a measure.


2

There are a lot of good things up here, but it misses one key point: you can't use an email address for a password reset, because it's not secure enough, and you don't use an email sign up. Those are the two key reasons why almost every online service has an email address associated. Without them, there's no reason not to use a username instead.


2

I will go against what others said and encourage using common language to make the application more friendly and personal to the user. Nowadays people do transactions from their mobile phones not just from home or office but other places. People go to restaurant and share the expenses through an app. Being very serious only makes the app very boring! ...


1

Change your messages to the style: me thinks you forgotta type da account numba, huh?! And you will soon not have to worry about strange ideas from your business unit. Any onther app this might be funny and you will find some customers who like it, but for the broad audience you hopefully have that is a no-go in the medical and financial sectors. If ...


1

As a developer creating an application for capital markets, I do not want to verify email addresses as valid by checking against any third party email providers even if they are good ones. I dont even allow anyone to sign up on their own. An admin signs them up, gives them a username. The login page itself is also an https. This is just because all banks, ...


1

Email is less secure than online banking (I hope) so maybe the thinking is that since people tend to use the same passwords for everything, using email instead of username for bank login would create a vulnerability in the case of email passwords leaking, the thief could go around and try that email password combination a bunch of places, and probably ...


1

Agree with the rest of the answers. One benefit you have with redesign is that you have and existing user base you can work with to figure out what user needs are, what they like/hate in the current system. We worked on a big redesign project and started with interviews and observing users using existing system. Observations were extremely useful since it ...


1

There are all sorts of things to consider when converting currencies. Unless the person entering the expense report can refer back to for example a credit card statement, getting it right can be a pain. So I'd say don't ask the person entering their expenses to convert to the base currency. Let them enter in the actual currency used an provide the business ...


1

There isn't a "correct" way of doing this, there are just common practices used by various groups. I suggest looking at applications that your target audience already use and see how they do it, that way you will be showing them what they are already used to. However, you need to fix your alignment of your numbers. They should be aligned on the decimal ...


1

The standard (or one of the standards, or a guideline) is to use an "en rule" (short dash) or an "em rule" (long dash). This is according to Wiley-Blackwell Style Guide - page 18. It should be a dash on its own rather than "$-". You can see this in use on Google Finance here (column "Volume"). UK Government also uses this standard - see this document, page ...



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