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You're showing check boxes in the primary filter list, does this mean your users can select multiple countries at the same time? This makes a big difference on how you display the secondary filters. If only one country can be selected then a drill down method could be employed. If multiple countries can be selected you will need a way for the user to ...


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How about dynamic tabs? The tabs and data change depending on the accordion channel being addressed.


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There are several reasons that if your facetted search is very open, more like a network of combined selections, that you should leave empty filters visible. Consistency You are better off disabling the filters so the interface retains consistency throughout the interaction. If there are always the same set of filters then the user can learn the interface ...


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Greying option is much better. This shows that you have such filter option on your website, but it's working in current set of filters. It can say more about things you sort. For example: you search some notebook to buy. When you set price filter form 0$ to 1000$, you can see that Apple filter option is grey and you decide that: This online show has ...


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disabling and greying out is a better options i believe.


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I would allow users to add tags with a link rather than just add them from any text they type, this would make them think about new tags and stop the majority of spelling errors (this should be a comment I know but I wanted to add the mock-up). download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


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Atop of @Tom's suggestions, if you involve your community you can crowdsource tag cleaning up. This might be a bit difficult to relate to the authors – other people being able to change MY tags?! –, but sites like StackExchanges and some flavours of image boards (ourobrous and clones) run fairly successfully that way. Without necessarily limiting the tag ...


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I can understand your concerns regarding messy tagging, however i think you should allow tagging. There are a couple of things you could implement to guide the user in the tagging process. First of all, i think it's sensible to only allow a small amount of tags, say 3. This forces the user to really think about the tags, and prevents tag lists like vampires ...


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The filtering options are placed top corner, horizontally side by side (usually left) when there are only few facets and facet values to show. Sorting options are placed more often right. There are also cases where filters are stacked on top of each other on the left and search results on the right (most typical layout). It is usually the best choice when ...


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Staged Disclosure UI pattern is one option here. It's a variant of Progressive Disclosure pattern. And Setup Wizard is a classical example of this pattern. In your case, I'd suggest **breaking the over-complex configuration screen into multiple ones that require fewer user interactions, and are less visually overwhelming. In other words, you can try to ...


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Limiting how deep your users can search may come back to haunt you later on. I think a more appropriate solution is to include in depth search metrics instead. If your primary concern is your users getting fire hosed with data, then allow them to get all the relevant data and then sort through it simply and easily. Unless you have a tiny user base doing a ...


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This answer sums it up nicely that Filtering takes an existing full list, and removes items based on criteria that match/don't match. Search takes a blank slate and adds to it based on criteria that match/don't match. In chronological order, that means that filtering usually is done after searching because it requires an already existing ...


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Under. If the filters are interacted with less than 25% of the time the search feature is used, they should be an addendum to the search text box + submit button, as in Sample 2. Visually Sample 2 has the textbox and submit button be sufficient for a search, whereas Sample 1 feels like the Filters need to be selected in order to be able to search. A case ...


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It appears you already have a preference for the master pattern of what is called faceted search (also called faceted navigation or guided navigation). Faceted search addresses the universal need to narrow. The infrastructure for faceted search enables a tighter relationship between search and browse, allowing real-time refinement of the results set. It's ...


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Izhaki has some good points, but I think the answer is a bit simpler. In my experience, the reason some applications handle filters instantly and others don't, is simply a technical one. Up to a few years ago, data (and big data in particular) was tough to wield. Sure it's easy enough to cache a couple of pages worth of data, but as soon as you start ...


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This is a very general question, You won't find studies or consensus on such a question. Reason is that in the core of UX is to work out a solution to problems that involve many variable specific to the use case (and users). Some variables In your case, some of the variables will be: What does the system do? What is the nature of the filters and the data ...


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I don't think that the timeline could add any value to the functionality. In most cases it's not anything more than a visual property. However, it can increase the visibility and readability. So in my opinion (B) is more correct. The default functionality of a timeline would be showing the "most recent" calls and it would be also the main view. I think in ...


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For a timeline to be more than a "sort by date" option, it needs to have another facet to it. What other useful information will displayed by the timeline other than just the order in which events happened? For example, if I was making filterable timeline of WWII events, I could use the space between events to give an indication of how far apart they were ...



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