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1

Both patterns are in use across a wide variety of applications, so there's no definitive answer. Most operating system menus have settled on graying out invalid options, so absent any other consideration you might want to follow their lead. Consider your users. Are they employees (aka a captive audience?) They may be trained and adapt more rapidly to hiding ...


3

Combine 1+2 with a little bit of seasoning. Option 2 is great because the selected range is thicker and a bit darker. But the black handles don't provide any affordance. So I would replace them with circular handles from Option 1, but why not throw in a bit of drop shadow for that extra-affordance?


0

Without knowing much of the context or output, I'd say four initial things: remember the affordance in context (is it to be manipulated by mouse or finger, or both, and which of these better indicate that/both of those interactions?) similarly, remember the affordance must be 'visible' in the context of use (straight up, regardless of device, 4 and 1 throw ...


1

The scrollbar and alphabet-index next to each other is likely to be too fiddly for mobile users. Mobile users (at least on iOS) are used to using the index in a fast-scroll way. The iOS contacts app only has an index (on the right), no scrollbar. Unless it is pure B2B or internal ECommerce for really old-school/ corporate audience, you should really take ...


1

Index on left and scroll on right is might be a good option. If the user uses the website from a mobile device then they cant able to select the alphabets as the screen size is too small and you cant accommodate all the alphabets in one single screen. so you can use like in the below image. The list is categorized by alphabetical order and each alphabet is ...


1

I would say definitely not overlapping. It would be very difficult for the users to select whatever they are looking for. It's the standard in every computer browser to have a scroll bar on the most right, so you should keep it this way. What you should consider more is the spacing between the list lines, the index and scroll bar. I think it looks nice the ...


0

Option #1 would be your best choice. Disabling sub-categories in response to category selection would allow the user to quickly see how their category choice effects the available sub-categories. In the example below, if I am ultimately looking for results in sub-category "Five" (which is currently disabled / greyed out), the interface suggests that I ...


0

What you are doing is adding the role item to the various different location or organization groups, however the UI design looks like the role is a group that you are adding location or organization items to. I believe this is why users are confused. Can you make it clear that the selected role is being added to the location / organization groups, rather ...



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