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1

Your suggesting would be poor UX, and poor business logic. By your logic every address that is of the form me@mydomain.com would be rejected because someone somewhere used a me@.... email address. There are many common names before the @ in email addresses, and trying to exclude me for example because there was some other iCloud user with the email ...


0

You don't have to always say yes to new features, nor empathize with them for what they want. Unless you are willing to pay for fully custom solutions, it's unreasonable to think that a company will bend to your will and implement everything for you. Of course, as that company, you want to ensure your user feels listened to, so instead of saying no, you can ...


3

Collecting knowledge is extremely important. Keep that barrier to entry low. It is a good thing to get data like this without friction. Unless you don't want the information, I would discourage you from telling people not to send or limit their sending. The issue is how do you manage the aggregated data efficiently. Data is a good thing, but only if you ...


6

It seems to me that a bug tracking or issue tracking tool (i.e. JIRA, Bugzilla, YouTrack) could help here, especially if the colleagues can create issues there directly (and not have to route through you). You can create a sprint or category called Backlog or Archive or Attic. You can capture any and all feedback there, but cherry pick issues and move them ...


3

I think you should do two things: Tell them to not send feedback every so often, because that interrupts the design process, much like it does for me at work. I get something done, then another "requirement" springs in. The design changes almost entirely to accommodate the newly found "requirement." If they want to send feedback, let them do it in an ...


17

You don’t know the weight of this information or how to compare it to other data. From that perspective it is useless for your own research. But don’t throw it away, it is still real feedback so better take it seriously. Once you’ve gathered your own data, don’t mix it up with this low quality feedback but use it to see if there are similarities. The reason ...


0

Ideally go talk to the customers and see what they want from your organisation. However if you have customer facing people (customer support, sales) you can talk to them and ask them about what the customers want.


0

It's human nature to not want to help people that you perceive as entitled or rude. You will clearly not do your most insightful and innovative work with the image of this user in your mind. Instead, strip this user's message to the core requirements and project them on to some imagined user - the persona as you mentioned. And put some depth into the ...


1

You don't have to empathize. You just have to understand and be responsive. Anger distorts judgment and causes the body stress. It's counterproductive to get angry yourself. And constant empathy can cause caregiver burnout. "Anger is a choice" may sound great until you start pushing a person to extremes, and everyone has their limit. For you, it may be ...


0

Building empathy is not enough. It actually does little to the customer experience unless it is followed up with the right verbiage, tone and a sensible solution to the root cause. As a customer once my initial dissatisfaction is addressed with empathy, I want the rep to provide a solution otherwise all the empathy in the world does me no good. Moreover, ...


2

I've found cultivating empathy to be one of the most challenging things in life. When faced with emotional criticism, provocations, or outright hostility, the expectations are that your response will be tinged with insincerity, dismissive, or vindictive in some way, despite being paying customers. In situations like this, you really must be the change that ...


0

Indicating the process is good or at least better that showing nothing. You've already mention the main reasons. If the users have an idea (or can rapidly form one is the use the app frequently) of what are the processes so they worked as an implicit progress bar would be better, but if they don't it's still better that showing nothing. Also remember to ...


20

Understanding and sharing your users thoughts and pain points Become an advocate! Key in this area is conducting frequent usability testing and inviting both users and business stakeholders to witness the process so all the relevant people can identify more forcefully and empathise with end users: Usability testing is sometimes seen as an ...


3

Well, from a user's point of view, it's always better to show them the app is working hard instead of 'supposedly' crashing/stalling. Some games I've seen give this a comic note by showing messages like: Blurring Reality Lines Initializing Dastardly Schemes Atomizing Atomic Particles While this might not be the best choice for your specific app, this ...


1

I'd suggest that this is the same issue as delays on computers generally and people's perception: Full details are on the link: http://www.nngroup.com/articles/response-times-3-important-limits/ In cases where the computer cannot provide fairly immediate response, continuous feedback should be provided to the user in form of a percent-done indicator ...


0

Short answer is YES! The user needs to know what is happening and to be honest 1min of spinning wheel is like a Apple beach ball - annoying and it doesn't tell me anything about when the process will be complete. The user hates being in the dark or confused. I know you are talking about the APP but if 50% of people drop off if the site doesn't load within ...


0

As long as the process is just a few seconds, I think you can handle it this way: User clicks "submit" to add a new tenant Show a loading modal with a message "Adding your tenant" (or something similar) with a little animation (as long as it is just a few seconds, you don't need to show the details of the process) After the tenant is added to the system, ...



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