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Oh, you're missing out on something essential here: Emotional design Strictly speaking, the word can be omitted. It really doesn't add any useful information to the context - but it does add a voice. I think the developer wanted to sound friendly and reassuring when he wrote that message. Remove all doubt and not sound like a dead message from a cold and ...


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This question is similar to something I recently implemented which has had success. Because I am unaware of the time required to process the request your users are clicking - I will try to give a few broad options. I will try to give answers that do not require building a dashboard or a completely new UI. Cost can drive up quickly doing so. The link ...


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Some ideas: After clicking the link, disable it so it can't be clicked again. Enable it again when it makes sense for it to be clicked again (if the process completes or fails). Display an indicator near the link to show that the process is in progress. This could be a simple spinner or throbber, a loading bar, a "please wait" message, etc. When the ...


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Ideas for you: User clicks on a link and a mini "request sent" status gets displayed next to the link If user stays on the page/page gets refreshed, the status next to the link updates to show the current status If user performs a lot of these long process time actions, consider putting together a dashboard where they can review status of all processes in ...


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Two simple suggestions for you: Display some form of loading image at the side of the button, indicating that there is some processing going on. This will ensure that the user does not click on the button multiple times for fear that the button is not working. Once done, you can easily hide this loading image. Change the text of the button to 'loading...' ...


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How do you think the word "successfully" affects the user experience? Is it something that should go away or is it all right to actually have the word in messages? Ambiguity "Operation X completed" can be ambiguous, for example: Microsoft SQL Server jobs produce messages like this when a job fails. Since the message doesn't always imply a successful ...


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You asked, is successfully necessary in "Operation X successfully completed"? I think that your question is loaded. What you should really be asking is whether the status message is optimally worded. Given that "successfully" and "completed" are somewhat redundant, I would say that completed is the word that should be removed. "Operation X succeeded" is ...


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Funny word, successful; I used to do a lot of Big Testing. I started every presentation with the words "all serious software has bugs. Our job is to find them. If our test was successful, it means we found bugs." I never gave way to the temptation to say "useful" or "productive" or whatever. Managers tend to think a successful test found no errors. Users ...


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I'm going to disagree with the others and say that sometimes the word successfully is meaningful. I agree that in many cases it is redundant and in those cases is not needed, however there are cases where it is useful. Mostly this applies in partial success cases or cases where you may expect an error. For example if you are validating a hard disk, then ...


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My opinion on your specific phrase: "Operation successfully completed" is that the successfully word is not needed because the completed already has intrinsically on it the meaning of having success. If your phrase was "Operation successfully made" or "Operation successfully done" I would not remove the successfully word.


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To add on to Phillips answer, the only time that a user needs to read information within a verification system would be when something atypical has occurred. So for example in a successfully completed action, the only indicator a user needs is to know everything has gone as expected. Even something as simple as the text "Complete" or "Thanks" with either a ...


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In talking to an end user, I don't see any action being unsuccesful 'and' completed. Not with those words anyway. But I do want to point out that it 'is' logical in certain cases. When doing asynchronous calls for example in programming there is a clear difference between success, error and complete. A call will always be completed, albeit succesfull or ...


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You trust you work, data and time to application. You communicate with application through interface. You often don't know what magic algorithms are working inside since you push the button to start operation. That's why word successfully to make sure user that everything OK continue you work. And about unsuccessful complete of operation. There is no ...


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"I can imagine tha you may get users to read by providing good button labels. If the button label is always "OK" then yes, noone will read anything and just click away. If your button labels provide the action or in Y/N dialogs something like "Yes, do it anyway" you probably have a better chance of people reading the text above (user thinks: "anyway? wait... ...


37

Answer "No". "Successfully" can be removed: Joel Spolsky covered this issue very well here: http://www.joelonsoftware.com/uibook/chapters/fog0000000062.html The basic rule of thumb is that: "In fact, users don't read anything. This may sound a little harsh, but you'll see, when you do usability tests, that there are quite a few users who simply do ...


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There is another issue with the word "successful" that I experienced in our SaaS. We provide a function in our application, where you can send stuff via email. However, the only thing we do is to send the email. The message used to be "Email successfully sent." User feedback then made us realize that they got the message more or less wrong as they believed ...


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I am writing this as an answer, because otherwise my question would be opinion based. I think that developers write such error messages because they know that a particular operation can fail in a million ways. Most of the time, the code developer writes has hundreds of conditions that can make the operation fail. It is a moment of success for the developers ...


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Just a thought: how about a horizontal line that appears at the top after a refresh, which slowly fades away? Any time the user can see the line, they know two things: They're at the top of the feed They have refreshed recently The line then slowly fades away over a minute or so. I'm not sure what kind of visual metaphor would work best here - something ...


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I would have all fields pre-filled except the ReCaptcha If the user enters an email that is already in use I might redirect to a log-in page with the email pre-filled. (with an option to go back and have the form still be pre-filled) This is of course assuming e-mail is the username to log in. Otherwise there could be an option for sending a username ...


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We need to look at the use case and environment. A few examples: ATM machine uses sound and asterisk/dot to provide feedback. This is pretty much everywhere. Normal web form for most desktop environment uses asterisk/dot. Here, the user is assumed to have good and stable control of he keyboard and knows what they are typing. Wifi password prompt in ...



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