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57

Let them know what has happened. Here are some situations with longer, clear example notifications that use proper English grammar: Only the name changed The task "foobar" has been successfully renamed to "dummy". Only the data changed The task "foobar" has been successfully updated. The name and the data changed The task "foobar" has been ...


8

Asking for feedback is no good from UX perspective at all, but it is good from the conversion point of view. You need ratings, as they convert to downloads, of course only if they are good good. Before asking a question, you need to make sure user got familiar with using the app. So asking for this before this moment is a waste and will either not result in ...


8

When you consider that much effort (hopefully) goes into the design of other pages on the website, it's wrong to think that the search engine results page (SERP) should receive any less love. There are several steps at which the zero SERP can be avoided or improved. The first point of prevention is at the query formulation using as-you-type suggestions, ...


8

Looking at your form, I have a couple of concerns about your feedback mechanism You are relying too much on color to communicate content or feedback and a colorblind user might not be able to see the difference between the two forms and might wonder what is the error is. I just ran your "error image" against a color blindness checker and in two types of ...


5

It seems like you have two issues: Verifying/understanding user requirements; and Convincing your team that testing is a good idea. Verifying/understanding user requirements When trying to understand or verify user requirements, I try to stay from using any type of mockup or prototype. In this stage, I try to understand the problem not attempt a ...


5

There are two different activities.... 1. Changing the details of a task and 2. Changing the task name itself. If details of task are changed, 'The task "foobar" has been successfully updated' is the message suitable. If the task name itself is changed, 'The task "foobar" has been successfully renamed to "dummy"' is the message suitable.


5

Taking this question as more about how to get feedback on prototypes*, that is quite straight forward - You need to set them tasks so that they are focused on using the prototype to achieve a goal. This could be things such as "From this screen where would you go to find out information about Red MacGuffin Shoes?" or "From the point of view of a typical ...


5

There is a saying "don't listen to your users, watch them", perhaps first suggested by Jacob Nielsen here. To design an easy-to-use interface, pay attention to what users do, not what they say. Self-reported claims are unreliable, as are user speculations about future behavior. If you search for "don't listen to your users" you'll find other ...


5

I propose a little different feedback model: Don't display feedback for a reasonable time or number of runs. Let the user get acknowledged with your app first and forms his opinion. Otherwise user could give fast "false" feedback for just get rid of annoying button or just ignore it (like banner blindness effect). Display feedback for reasonable time then. ...


5

As the specific terms are used, just make it obvious, instead of relying on user's memory. It's recognition over recall heuristic. This visualization helps to support mental model and eliminate errors. It's better to use animation when switching between fields.


5

A little icon will work wonders in helping people visually relate the value to the parameter. I would also put the fields the other way around so that the smaller parameter naturally precedes the larger parameter in the correctly numerically sorted order. And in the event of both fields being completed, then on the loss of focus show a message, with the ...


4

A few solutions could be: Color coding on shifter - Forward moving gears could be colored green while reverse is left white. Red wouldn't be ideal since that's so closely related to 'stop'. There are problems with this approach because does white clearly mean reverse? Would a user be looking at the gear when choosing them? Could the graphic on the gear ...


4

A common affordance which informs users about cars reversing in india is the use of audio tunes to inform the user that the car is currently in reverse. Though its a very good affordance which immediately informs the user and the people around him that the car is in reverse, it does suffer from the issue of contributing the noise pollution and also the ...


4

Two buttons with the same functionality (Dismiss) for a user and some different meaning for you (Feedback) could lead to some issues: user has no "neutral" choice, so you do force him to take some desicion (like vs dislike). mixing two function in each button (Like+Dismiss and Dislike+Dismiss) could lead to false results. The only meaningful operation for ...


3

I swear that I will repeatedly tell users that nothing is guaranteed to actually appear in the final product, and that it may end up looking nothing like the mockups Tried that many times, it simply doesn't work that way. Problem #1: Users will have false sense of progress - There is nothing you can say or do to explain to your customers that what you ...


3

The way Behance does it seems very effective: At the bottom of posts there's an "Appreciate this" button that's standard throughout the site. Once the user clicks, the button changes to "Thank you" which provides the immediate feedback that the action was successful. The feedback is immediate and exactly where the user's focus is. Besides the message, the ...


3

There will always be a section of any user base that will hate a developer if they dare charge for anything. (Even if (as per your proposal) the charge is voluntary and those who aren't prepared to pay can still hitch a ride on the coattails of those who do; which is the problem that shareware has always had.) The people who fall into this category expect to ...


3

It is known effect of the skilled users can't verbalize their thoughts. From Testing Expert Users by J.Nielsen: Skilled behavior is often automated behavior. When people are unaware of how they think about a certain behavior, they can't verbalize the reasoning behind their actions. Expert users can turn into design critics and bend your ear with ...


3

There are many ways of collecting user feedback. Asking for opinions about the product is one way to get feedback, which is often called "self-reported usability feedback" (or "self-reported usability survey"). I understood that your question is related to that kind of feedback, which is not particularly bad as long as you analyze the results in context ...


3

The only thing you need to do is to collect 3-5 users and conduct a simple user test. Preferably some of the users that would actually be among your end users - but that's not that important right now. Ask them, one by one, to carry out a certain task on your app. Observe! Don't tell. When they struggle: Ask why. When they succeed: Ask why. I can assure ...


3

It depends. I'd show a striped progress bar while an operation is stalling or waiting. E.g. waiting for a connection or user input. Then I distinguish two cases: The operation has no progress yet. Show the striped animation over the full length of the bar, as if progress was 100%. The operation has some progress. Show the striped animation over only the ...


3

User can enter his name later in his profile, if he wants to. The ultimate rule of any form is to be as simple (use as less fields) as possible. Users are lazy. Assuming you have proper labels above your fields (and that all of them are mandatory), it makes sense to highlight erroneous fields with red outline and display one "Please fill" message at the ...


3

The second text is clearly the winner here. Its more human. Its clear, non technical and it has a positive approach to it (in comparison to the first). No offense but most users don't care if it took you months or years or how hard the process of building the app is... they want to use it and enjoy it enough to reuse it and tell people why they should try ...


2

"The task "foobar" has been successfully updated" for updates within the task, but not the name. if the update is the name or includes the name then : "The task "foobar" has been successfully updated and renamed to "dummy" "


2

This is not an answer. It is a lengthy comment on the phrasing of the question. How could the mode of the car's transmission be made clearer to prevent this error? suggests that the driver is unaware of the mode of the car's transmission and that clearer, more persistent, less ambiguous, more salient, etc., communication of the mode of the car's ...


2

Why? If you're going for gamification, consider something that adds more social value. Something that gives some cred within the community of the site. Or possibly greater privileges within the community. Passing out something like Editor status could answer both of those angles. But don't offer more irritating site chrome.


2

Another method of providing the "all clear" is the "notification box" prototype. It's a well-recognized and comforrtable method to deliver messages to users (See the StackExchange top bar, Google top bar, Facebook, etc.) Use a small amount of space for an icon and a little extra for a flagged condition to indicate when there's new content. On hover or ...


2

If there is a continuous process which is going on in the background or which you are monitoring then it makes sense to have a continuous positive feedback (the green light!). Feedback of any kind is in response to a trigger. It can be user initiated or system initiated. If the trigger is continuous, I would suggest a continuous feedback too. The ...


2

A few random thoughts: Focus on value. On the convincing the developers side I would be talking more about the value of the feedback. How much will it cost us to build the wrong thing, or build the right thing badly? Is the cost worth while? The developers are right. Some of the people you show it too will think that feature X will be in the final release. ...


2

The first step is to start blaming yourself for the user's errors (generally speaking, of course), instead of blaming the users. If the user flops then this is an opportunity to fix the UI so it's less likely for the same issue to happen again instead of stashing a threatening message in a FAQ. Think about the FAQ as a set of Frequent questions meaning ...



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