Hot answers tagged

57

Remember 0.1, 1.0, and 10 seconds... You have about 1 second to show something whether that be the finished result or an indicator that the computer is working (usually some type of spinner) Not doing anything for 1 whole second after a user initiates an action can still make an application feel sluggish (as noted in the comments below) so I like to ...


52

The fewer words the better, and no words at all are better than negative words. Don't say why you think there might be a problem, or even that you think there is likely to be a problem. Instead just make it easy for them to contact you in the event that they do happen to come across a problem. I quite liked an experience I had recently at surfdome where it ...


17

You don’t know the weight of this information or how to compare it to other data. From that perspective it is useless for your own research. But don’t throw it away, it is still real feedback so better take it seriously. Once you’ve gathered your own data, don’t mix it up with this low quality feedback but use it to see if there are similarities. The reason ...


13

Resolve the behavioral stumbling block You make a key observation that it's hard to get users to backtrack from a specific suggestion ("I want this button!") that they are psychologically anchored on. I agree. You can use reason and charm to get a user off a fixation on a specific UX suggestion, but the effort involved in doing that can result in ...


13

I suspect that people aren't clicking because giving feedback isn't what they are there to do - they are being contracted to perform data entry. You say you don't have direct access to the users. Do you know how they are being trained? It could be that their managers are being explicit about what they can and cannot do with the software (for instance, they ...


12

The feedback button in the menu bar is a somewhat hidden and the meaning may actually be getting blurred to the user. Another problem may simply be that the users are there to do a job, and providing feedback is (unfortunately) not part of that. One issue is the close proximity to all the menus. If you scan the menu structure below (taken from my Chrome, ...


11

User performance not user opinions The solution is to do a proper usability test. Don’t show users a prototype and ask them what they think of it. That’s asking them to imagine what it would be like to use the product, which yields unreliable data. Instead, have them use the prototype so they (and you by your measures) know what it’s like to use the ...


10

Commenting is all about context. A few examples of websites encouraging people to generate content On a social platform like Facebook, asking "What's on your mind?" in the new-status box is an interactive, clear and concise way to hint as to what is to be written. On a knowledge-sharing, social platform like Quora, indicating topics of interest to the ...


9

I've tried to solve this same question in the past. Here's my solution. Keep it short. Direct them to activities. Focus the issue with a choice: "I'm trying to do something that's not currently possible" OR "I'm doing something and the app isn't doing what I expected" Ask about activities: "What were you trying to do when things went wrong?" This changes ...


9

This won't fully answer your question since you already included part of the answer in your question :) For the part where the user (or the client in some cases) insists on "But I WANT a BUTTON", I have some useful techniques: I re-confirm the user/client problem. I shift him/her from proposing solution to identifying the problem. This may require a lot ...


6

It seems to me that a bug tracking or issue tracking tool (i.e. JIRA, Bugzilla, YouTrack) could help here, especially if the colleagues can create issues there directly (and not have to route through you). You can create a sprint or category called Backlog or Archive or Attic. You can capture any and all feedback there, but cherry pick issues and move them ...


6

You can try changing the menu bar to "Suggestions?" with or without the question mark. Not to get too skeumorphic but users are familiar with the concept of a 'Suggestion Box' where you would drop in a letter with a complaint, suggestion for improvement, etc. How often do you see that labeled as a 'Feedback' box? If you are really getting zero feedback ...


6

If the internet has taught us one thing it's that everyone has an opinion. It has also taught us that attention spans online are short so unless I feel that sharing my opinion is worth the effort I'll pass. Here are a couple things you can do to remedy this situation and increase reader engagement... 1. Make sure users know why their opinion is important ...


5

DaveAlger's answer seems to pretty much cover the question, but I would contend that if a process is wired up to display a progress bar, you might as well show it immediately in all cases. An hourglass says "something is taking a long time when we didn't expect it to". A progress bar-- even the fake barber-pole kind-- says "this is taking a while, but we ...


5

The worst thing to do is to redirect a user to a different page after a time-out. It's best to keep them within the same page and present them with a lightbox that informs them that their session has expired. This gives them the opportunity to re-login to continue working before being redirected to a different page. Regarding the discard of changes, this ...


5

There's an old saying, "Treat kind people kindly. Treat unkind people even more kindly." With the user interface, I think an analogy applies: "Take good advice seriously. Take bad advice even more seriously." It could be that the "attitudinal feedback" is bad advice based on nothing more than an aesthetic preference. Or they don't understand the data ...


4

Group theory I think you are applying your knowledge of the functional logic, where in your mind it's a case of: A or ( A and B ) But that suggests that B can exist on its own, and you are treating B as an independent group like so: But this isn't really the case - with the interface provided, say someone presses the star, which will highlight both ...


4

Yes, it's good to inform users ...particularly if there are mixed links on the page (some open in new tabs and some don't). One popular way to denote new-tab links inline is to use an icon as follows: If you're developing using CSS, this can be done in a way that fails gracefully for text-only or accessibility browsers. You can insert an :after sprite, ...


4

Ideally, a user should be either aware of what will be undone, or reminded of what will be undone. If the user has changed the context of their work (i.e. scrolled out of view or changed views) or a significant amount of time has passed, they might no longer remember what the last action was. At the same time, it could be frustrating to be reminded ...


4

Normally when users submit something they expect a response, and they expect this response to match their inquiry. When users submit their order they expect to be told whether it was submitted successfully or not, not taken back to the menu. If you think of the process analogous to a real food order how would you feel if the clerk took your payment and then ...


3

Collecting knowledge is extremely important. Keep that barrier to entry low. It is a good thing to get data like this without friction. Unless you don't want the information, I would discourage you from telling people not to send or limit their sending. The issue is how do you manage the aggregated data efficiently. Data is a good thing, but only if you ...


3

I think you should do two things: Tell them to not send feedback every so often, because that interrupts the design process, much like it does for me at work. I get something done, then another "requirement" springs in. The design changes almost entirely to accommodate the newly found "requirement." If they want to send feedback, let them do it in an ...


3

I think people are getting off topic here, essentially you've asked 'which of the options out of my choice of 4 is best'. In which case the current option you are using is best as it's the most common and clear. The ones with questions could help as they are leading people in, but frankly if 1/1000 visitors is commenting at present I'd said switching to one ...


3

Instead of displaying a "load more" button, you can easily just put a phrase that says something like "end" such as: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups Obviously, wording can change, but as long as they know that there is nothing more to show. Heck, even not displaying a button anymore can be sufficient enough.


3

If you have enough space, you could use -strikethrough- to indicate that there was default/prior data that has gotten replaced. And though you mention font styles, I get the idea that you just mean bold, italic etcetera. But you could also use a different font entirely. Combine those two options and you get something like this: This definitely is a bit ...


3

A/B testing. Create two prototypes one which has the features, you are looking to test, the other one does not. If the storyline is the same and the user is able to complete the tasks this product is designed to do then by default those features are useless. You can also create prototypes that only focus specifically on the features that need testing and not ...


2

We use inVision. You can upload your screens and link through to create a basic prototype. You can then invite people by email to review and leave comments on the prototype so they are all in one place. I think you get 2 or 3 free projects, enough to gather feedback in one place. Failing that, use Trello - invite people to the board to leave comments! The ...


2

I'm sure this is going to upset several people but here it goes. I personally believe that this is not a user issue. A user is not going to have insightful UX requirements and this is the reason that there is a need for your expertise. Even the most educated people, which have used computers for 20+ years, struggle with computers and the internet as a ...


2

There's two issues here to address: getting a proper understanding of what the suggested change is supposed to accomplish, and avoiding resistance or frustration from the customer because "why are you asking me about the problem, when I've already told you what you need to do to fix it?". In my experience it is extremely difficult to resolve this well ...


2

1 second is a long time at work. 400ms might be better. longer than this is often identified as "laggy" and calls performance into question. One of the applications I worked on some 20 years ago waited on transactional data from a server that typically took 15-25 seconds to arrive in extreme cases (9600b/s multi-drop line). On the window concerned the ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible