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11

User performance not user opinions The solution is to do a proper usability test. Don’t show users a prototype and ask them what they think of it. That’s asking them to imagine what it would be like to use the product, which yields unreliable data. Instead, have them use the prototype so they (and you by your measures) know what it’s like to use the product....


6

It is best to give some sort of feedback. The Netflix DVD Queue doesn't pop anything up, but it gives clear visual feedback that something has happened and that you can undo it. Gmail provides an actual popup, but it's completely ignorable. The problem with modal popup notifications is that stopping what you're doing in order to close notifications - ...


5

There's an old saying, "Treat kind people kindly. Treat unkind people even more kindly." With the user interface, I think an analogy applies: "Take good advice seriously. Take bad advice even more seriously." It could be that the "attitudinal feedback" is bad advice based on nothing more than an aesthetic preference. Or they don't understand the data ...


4

Normally when users submit something they expect a response, and they expect this response to match their inquiry. When users submit their order they expect to be told whether it was submitted successfully or not, not taken back to the menu. If you think of the process analogous to a real food order how would you feel if the clerk took your payment and then ...


3

A/B testing. Create two prototypes one which has the features, you are looking to test, the other one does not. If the storyline is the same and the user is able to complete the tasks this product is designed to do then by default those features are useless. You can also create prototypes that only focus specifically on the features that need testing and not ...


3

Yes it is the best practice to show feedback messages on such actions... it means your system is having conversation with the user and the user is aware of what is happening, but don't annoy with too many alerts. With a feedback cycle, you can tell the user what is going on in your application. However, keep in mind that the applications’s feedback ...


3

Train your users Start by letting your users know how to use the system, and define some common notices. For example: Explain the process Now, you can tell them that if they do something unexpected, they won't be able to do the task. You can also add a right click notice to explain EXACTLY what is wrong (and of course, tell them "right click on element for ...


3

If you have enough space, you could use -strikethrough- to indicate that there was default/prior data that has gotten replaced. And though you mention font styles, I get the idea that you just mean bold, italic etcetera. But you could also use a different font entirely. Combine those two options and you get something like this: This definitely is a bit ...


3

Give background colour for Updated or user modified text like light yellow or light green. Or you can go with another option is Italic font style for the updates text.


3

This seems like a very bad idea: what happens if I want to add 3 hours and 25 minutes? or if I actually do enter the time in hours and minutes - If I enter 3.30 will it register 3.5 hours or 3 hours and 18 minutes? Set the format you want users to enter their times with and keep it that way: If you're asking users to enter decimal time then you should ...


2

We use inVision. You can upload your screens and link through to create a basic prototype. You can then invite people by email to review and leave comments on the prototype so they are all in one place. I think you get 2 or 3 free projects, enough to gather feedback in one place. Failing that, use Trello - invite people to the board to leave comments! The ...


2

The use of a success message is highly dependent on the action performed (its nature and importance), the context of use and your intended users. For example, when changing account settings on a website, an unobtrusive success message is shown after applying the changes. This is often necessary because the user is not able to see the difference between the ...


2

Provide an icon suggesting edition by a human Along with DasBeasto's answer, I think that an icon representing the modified rows is the right solution. Type emphasis such as bold and italics do not convey any particular meaning here, and it will be indeed difficult to distinguish between default and modified values if the majority of the rows are modified....


2

Your problem might serve as a good problem to you. This is because you get to define principles onto your own website/app as to what refers to what. You'll need to develop a Key map that showcases- Values that haven't been edited Values that are edited Values that are constantly being edited. Values settled after Editing. I would recommend using a ...


2

Display an icon to symbolize that the value has been edited UX.se uses an arrow icon next to a post to indicate that it has been modified. You could use the same technique in a table of data. Since you indicated you like the icon idea but are unsure of the pencil here are a few more ideas. Visual Studio signifies a document has been checked out for ...


2

Yes, people provide feedback in those. I have been responsible for public feedback on applications with millions of customers, so I've spent many hours reading such feedback. Since the feedback is unfiltered and people can write whatever they would like, you should expect to get anything and everything. I've seen everything from personal threats to crash ...


2

I would have thought it would be difficult to gauge willingness to update browser software, unless you use a questionnaire. Apart from an inability to upgrade due to security restrictions, there is fear of technology, etc. So don't use a questionnaire to gauge willingness. A better approach: If you are using Google Analytics, you can see how many users are ...


2

The goal Let's make the goal obvious: we need to get feedback from users, so the success metric is conversion rate, which defines the best option among the ones. Some heuristics People don't like to fill the forms, so minimize input People don't like complex tasks, so make it as simple, as possible People estimate complexity of the task by assessing UI. ...


2

As a UX designer, it's our job to help the user in accomplishing their task. I would recommend the approach of encouraging the user towards the more effective tool as oppose to discouraging them from using the other. Are the two machines always paired? If your machine can detect the pairing, you can consider redirecting or provide instructions for the user ...


1

Based on the comment you made to Diego, your question is a lot different than what it looks at first sight. If you require a lot of interaction, then don't offer a notification each time, and don't save each action immediately. Instead, create sessions where the user can do any amount of actions (you can autosave every X amount of minutes). In these ...


1

Do not forget that error messages may be appealing but they must be useful above anything else. Differentiate your messages! A brief description of what will not work (if it's not obvious) is good and appropriate but do not lazy stick to one generic error message. You know what's wrong then do a favor to users and keep them informed, they may even be ...


1

The best error messages help guide the users towards a solution (if you have the room). What about something like this: "To use video chat (or whatever the feature is), please use a device with a video camera"


1

Solve the real problem It sounds like your users are taking extra steps to get to this control, despite your best efforts. So the question is why? You mentioned that this is for scientists and engineers. I've worked with this audience before and I know they want total control over their equipment. And when they mess with settings, they are usually trying ...


1

You can try to place a button 'Review Us' near their screens, and ensure your polls are very flexible to have customer enter their ideas, their thought. One more thing, you can try to use a live chat during beta period to reach customer very closely.


1

I think there is no substitute for getting your product in front of real people as early in the lifecycle of the product as possible. While I understand the desire for quantitative data, if the product is not yet released, then that option is not available. Ideally you will get your product in front of people who are your customers, or at least who are as ...


1

The most simplistic and eye-peaking method is using italic or bold text. If you have a TODO-List like this: Sleep Do This Do That Do nothing, you earned it In this example, completed objectives are unformatted ("Sleep"). Everything I still need to do is bold ("Do This", "Do That") and user edited objectives are italic ("Do nothing,..")


1

Here are related findings, they are not nailing the question but can be interesting for followers... Using delayed auditory feedback (delay 0.175 s) a standardized form of mental stress was investigated in 8 healthy male volunteers. After a resting period and a period of undelayed reading, the volunteers were exposed for 5 min to the DAF stress. During ...


1

In my experience, meetings work best. Meet with your team (use web conferencing if some of them work long distance) and walk through the wireframe/prototype together. To get the information you need, proceed in this order. Let them try the interface and see what they say. If you need more info then... Guide them to areas of interest and see what they ...


1

I don't know if other people think about these covnentions in the same way I do but the way I see them is. Notice: Simply a statement that is non-actionable, use these to alert the user of something smaller and passive that you want the use to notice, such as an event that has happened like successful submit. Info: Actionable statement that you need the ...


1

A dot that grows and shrinks—which you request because it has an organic feel—can signal the breathing rate by switching from expansion to contraction, showing when to breathe in and when to breathe out. If the dot that grows and shrinks is inside a circle that represent lung capacity, then you can help the user see when to take shallow breaths and when to ...



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