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41

Answer "No". "Successfully" can be removed: Joel Spolsky covered this issue very well here: http://www.joelonsoftware.com/uibook/chapters/fog0000000062.html The basic rule of thumb is that: "In fact, users don't read anything. This may sound a little harsh, but you'll see, when you do usability tests, that there are quite a few users who simply do ...


24

TLDR; A time based message (timestamp, declarative sentence, or both) in the pull to refresh tray assists user understanding of the age of data shown in the feed. New items available to pull can be indicated with a visual counter. Example: Tweetbot has executed their pull to refresh in a useful, informative way. The time based message is always shown as ...


17

There is another issue with the word "successful" that I experienced in our SaaS. We provide a function in our application, where you can send stuff via email. However, the only thing we do is to send the email. The message used to be "Email successfully sent." User feedback then made us realize that they got the message more or less wrong as they believed ...


13

Most commonly I have seen this done with a refresh timestamp, so you might see a message "Last updated 5 seconds ago" at the top of the item list, close to the place where new items would appear when available.


11

I'm going to disagree with the others and say that sometimes the word successfully is meaningful. I agree that in many cases it is redundant and in those cases is not needed, however there are cases where it is useful. Mostly this applies in partial success cases or cases where you may expect an error. For example if you are validating a hard disk, then ...


9

Looking at your form, I have a couple of concerns about your feedback mechanism You are relying too much on color to communicate content or feedback and a colorblind user might not be able to see the difference between the two forms and might wonder what is the error is. I just ran your "error image" against a color blindness checker and in two types of ...


6

How do you think the word "successfully" affects the user experience? Is it something that should go away or is it all right to actually have the word in messages? Ambiguity "Operation X completed" can be ambiguous, for example: Microsoft SQL Server jobs produce messages like this when a job fails. Since the message doesn't always imply a successful ...


5

As the specific terms are used, just make it obvious, instead of relying on user's memory. It's recognition over recall heuristic. This visualization helps to support mental model and eliminate errors. It's better to use animation when switching between fields.


5

A little icon will work wonders in helping people visually relate the value to the parameter. I would also put the fields the other way around so that the smaller parameter naturally precedes the larger parameter in the correctly numerically sorted order. And in the event of both fields being completed, then on the loss of focus show a message, with the ...


5

The big thing is that you don't want your user to reach a dead-end. How can you curl this microinteraction back around to another action? Is there is an action that the user could take to keep their feed updated more like following more topics, people, or questions? Give the user a proactive way to keep their stream updating instead of an error message that ...


5

Typically, apps like Twitter or Facebook use this kind of pull-to-refresh: ...but when there is no new data, it simply returns to normal, like you said. One possible solution is, after finding no new entries, change the "Loading..." to say "No new entries", then disappear after a short delay.


5

"I can imagine tha you may get users to read by providing good button labels. If the button label is always "OK" then yes, noone will read anything and just click away. If your button labels provide the action or in Y/N dialogs something like "Yes, do it anyway" you probably have a better chance of people reading the text above (user thinks: "anyway? wait... ...


4

The second text is clearly the winner here. Its more human. Its clear, non technical and it has a positive approach to it (in comparison to the first). No offense but most users don't care if it took you months or years or how hard the process of building the app is... they want to use it and enjoy it enough to reuse it and tell people why they should try ...


4

This is a very common problem. Many companies and other large organizations that offer a lot of support solve this by essentially requiring you to go through FAQ-like content before they even provide you with any way to contact them directly. Some take this to such lengths that it is very annoying for those of us who actually have a question not answered ...


3

User can enter his name later in his profile, if he wants to. The ultimate rule of any form is to be as simple (use as less fields) as possible. Users are lazy. Assuming you have proper labels above your fields (and that all of them are mandatory), it makes sense to highlight erroneous fields with red outline and display one "Please fill" message at the ...


3

Totally agree with Bart. I always suggest to favor friendly message just like if it was a real human talking to you. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups


3

It depends. I'd show a striped progress bar while an operation is stalling or waiting. E.g. waiting for a connection or user input. Then I distinguish two cases: The operation has no progress yet. Show the striped animation over the full length of the bar, as if progress was 100%. The operation has some progress. Show the striped animation over only the ...


3

The only thing you need to do is to collect 3-5 users and conduct a simple user test. Preferably some of the users that would actually be among your end users - but that's not that important right now. Ask them, one by one, to carry out a certain task on your app. Observe! Don't tell. When they struggle: Ask why. When they succeed: Ask why. I can assure ...


3

put in a "be the first to rate this product"-indicator and/or mark it as "unrated". I, personally, like to see the ratio - like youtube, amazon and others do. Either minimalistically by giving the number of total votes or by showing how many voted for what (thumbs up/down or 1-star, 2-star, ..).


2

As a general rule i definitly advice you to "kill your darling" when it's not working as intended in user tests. Remember, you're not designing this UI for yourself, you're designing it for your users However, it would help if you show a screenshot of how the interface looks, maybe there are other problems causing the users to not understand the buttons ...


2

Colors can evoke emotion. For example red symbolises passion, blue trustworthiness and green innovation. Just googling 'color emotion' or 'color meaning' and maybe even in combination with the term 'website' can give you lots of reading material. Choosing colors is also about what looks good, but that's aesthetic and has little to do with UX for it is more ...


2

Not really. If you got your users to actually play around with your application you've come a long way. This is what users do when they see something new. This is true on iPhone, Facebook and any other device/application. Getting users to play is to me the gold medal!


2

Your colors should tie into your brand, should never overwhelm your users, and should be used consistently in your design. While there is deep psychology behind colors, different products treat them in very different ways. For example, red is very often used for warnings or errors. But currently Google products are using red for user inputs like composing ...


2

Based on your comment in response to PatomaS' comment on your question... :) How about something like this? It allows you to: show 5 / 10 / 100... questions per page go to a specific question by putting in the question number paginate, scroll etc. If this works for you, you can look at jqGrid for such list implementations.


2

You can only prevent a wrong input by setting constraints to the input method. Like using sliders which adjust their position automatically and can not be moved into a wrong position. When using input fields either tell the user what went wrong and keep him from proceeding to the next step: or force the user to see that the system changed (auto corrected) ...


2

I'd like to point out that we are currently operating in a website that uses a rating system and does it quite successfully. There's also a component of gamification, but the rating system itself is quite effective ensuring quality content (mostly because of user discipline and moderators). You are completely right about the subjectivity in the ratings, ...


2

I'm thinking about pre-filling the following for sure with the same values that were previously input by the user: First name, Last name, Email, Terms (checkbox). I think you are right to do that. But should I also do that for the New Password and Re-enter email fields? In the case of an error with the e-mail, I think that you should ...


2

Maybe the speech-balloon could work: HTML Decimal: 💬 HTML HEx: 💬


2

In talking to an end user, I don't see any action being unsuccesful 'and' completed. Not with those words anyway. But I do want to point out that it 'is' logical in certain cases. When doing asynchronous calls for example in programming there is a clear difference between success, error and complete. A call will always be completed, albeit succesfull or ...


2

To add on to Phillips answer, the only time that a user needs to read information within a verification system would be when something atypical has occurred. So for example in a successfully completed action, the only indicator a user needs is to know everything has gone as expected. Even something as simple as the text "Complete" or "Thanks" with either a ...



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