Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

22

TLDR; A time based message (timestamp, declarative sentence, or both) in the pull to refresh tray assists user understanding of the age of data shown in the feed. New items available to pull can be indicated with a visual counter. Example: Tweetbot has executed their pull to refresh in a useful, informative way. The time based message is always shown as ...


12

Most commonly I have seen this done with a refresh timestamp, so you might see a message "Last updated 5 seconds ago" at the top of the item list, close to the place where new items would appear when available.


9

Looking at your form, I have a couple of concerns about your feedback mechanism You are relying too much on color to communicate content or feedback and a colorblind user might not be able to see the difference between the two forms and might wonder what is the error is. I just ran your "error image" against a color blindness checker and in two types of ...


8

When you consider that much effort (hopefully) goes into the design of other pages on the website, it's wrong to think that the search engine results page (SERP) should receive any less love. There are several steps at which the zero SERP can be avoided or improved. The first point of prevention is at the query formulation using as-you-type suggestions, ...


5

Taking this question as more about how to get feedback on prototypes*, that is quite straight forward - You need to set them tasks so that they are focused on using the prototype to achieve a goal. This could be things such as "From this screen where would you go to find out information about Red MacGuffin Shoes?" or "From the point of view of a typical ...


5

I propose a little different feedback model: Don't display feedback for a reasonable time or number of runs. Let the user get acknowledged with your app first and forms his opinion. Otherwise user could give fast "false" feedback for just get rid of annoying button or just ignore it (like banner blindness effect). Display feedback for reasonable time then. ...


5

There is a saying "don't listen to your users, watch them", perhaps first suggested by Jacob Nielsen here. To design an easy-to-use interface, pay attention to what users do, not what they say. Self-reported claims are unreliable, as are user speculations about future behavior. If you search for "don't listen to your users" you'll find other ...


5

As the specific terms are used, just make it obvious, instead of relying on user's memory. It's recognition over recall heuristic. This visualization helps to support mental model and eliminate errors. It's better to use animation when switching between fields.


5

A little icon will work wonders in helping people visually relate the value to the parameter. I would also put the fields the other way around so that the smaller parameter naturally precedes the larger parameter in the correctly numerically sorted order. And in the event of both fields being completed, then on the loss of focus show a message, with the ...


5

The big thing is that you don't want your user to reach a dead-end. How can you curl this microinteraction back around to another action? Is there is an action that the user could take to keep their feed updated more like following more topics, people, or questions? Give the user a proactive way to keep their stream updating instead of an error message that ...


5

Typically, apps like Twitter or Facebook use this kind of pull-to-refresh: ...but when there is no new data, it simply returns to normal, like you said. One possible solution is, after finding no new entries, change the "Loading..." to say "No new entries", then disappear after a short delay.


4

Two buttons with the same functionality (Dismiss) for a user and some different meaning for you (Feedback) could lead to some issues: user has no "neutral" choice, so you do force him to take some desicion (like vs dislike). mixing two function in each button (Like+Dismiss and Dislike+Dismiss) could lead to false results. The only meaningful operation for ...


4

The second text is clearly the winner here. Its more human. Its clear, non technical and it has a positive approach to it (in comparison to the first). No offense but most users don't care if it took you months or years or how hard the process of building the app is... they want to use it and enjoy it enough to reuse it and tell people why they should try ...


3

It is known effect of the skilled users can't verbalize their thoughts. From Testing Expert Users by J.Nielsen: Skilled behavior is often automated behavior. When people are unaware of how they think about a certain behavior, they can't verbalize the reasoning behind their actions. Expert users can turn into design critics and bend your ear with ...


3

The only thing you need to do is to collect 3-5 users and conduct a simple user test. Preferably some of the users that would actually be among your end users - but that's not that important right now. Ask them, one by one, to carry out a certain task on your app. Observe! Don't tell. When they struggle: Ask why. When they succeed: Ask why. I can assure ...


3

There are many ways of collecting user feedback. Asking for opinions about the product is one way to get feedback, which is often called "self-reported usability feedback" (or "self-reported usability survey"). I understood that your question is related to that kind of feedback, which is not particularly bad as long as you analyze the results in context ...


3

It depends. I'd show a striped progress bar while an operation is stalling or waiting. E.g. waiting for a connection or user input. Then I distinguish two cases: The operation has no progress yet. Show the striped animation over the full length of the bar, as if progress was 100%. The operation has some progress. Show the striped animation over only the ...


3

User can enter his name later in his profile, if he wants to. The ultimate rule of any form is to be as simple (use as less fields) as possible. Users are lazy. Assuming you have proper labels above your fields (and that all of them are mandatory), it makes sense to highlight erroneous fields with red outline and display one "Please fill" message at the ...


2

Your vision of feedback only as of information gathering method is too narrow. I like both @obelia and @DA01 answers in context of information gathering. But thinking wider, feedback from the users' point of view is: Communication tool. Users use feedback as fast and easy way to communicate with company, no matter of feedback content. Control tool. Users ...


2

Pros: some comments may trigger thoughts that hadn't been previously considered Cons: people don't always know what they want the users are often lacking big-picture context they are giving feedback in the context of how they understand the technology works, rather than what the technology can potentially do None of that infers that you should not ...


2

As a general rule i definitly advice you to "kill your darling" when it's not working as intended in user tests. Remember, you're not designing this UI for yourself, you're designing it for your users However, it would help if you show a screenshot of how the interface looks, maybe there are other problems causing the users to not understand the buttons ...


2

Colors can evoke emotion. For example red symbolises passion, blue trustworthiness and green innovation. Just googling 'color emotion' or 'color meaning' and maybe even in combination with the term 'website' can give you lots of reading material. Choosing colors is also about what looks good, but that's aesthetic and has little to do with UX for it is more ...


2

Your colors should tie into your brand, should never overwhelm your users, and should be used consistently in your design. While there is deep psychology behind colors, different products treat them in very different ways. For example, red is very often used for warnings or errors. But currently Google products are using red for user inputs like composing ...


2

Not really. If you got your users to actually play around with your application you've come a long way. This is what users do when they see something new. This is true on iPhone, Facebook and any other device/application. Getting users to play is to me the gold medal!


2

You can only prevent a wrong input by setting constraints to the input method. Like using sliders which adjust their position automatically and can not be moved into a wrong position. When using input fields either tell the user what went wrong and keep him from proceeding to the next step: or force the user to see that the system changed (auto corrected) ...


2

Based on your comment in response to PatomaS' comment on your question... :) How about something like this? It allows you to: show 5 / 10 / 100... questions per page go to a specific question by putting in the question number paginate, scroll etc. If this works for you, you can look at jqGrid for such list implementations.


2

I'd like to point out that we are currently operating in a website that uses a rating system and does it quite successfully. There's also a component of gamification, but the rating system itself is quite effective ensuring quality content (mostly because of user discipline and moderators). You are completely right about the subjectivity in the ratings, ...


2

I'm thinking about pre-filling the following for sure with the same values that were previously input by the user: First name, Last name, Email, Terms (checkbox). I think you are right to do that. But should I also do that for the New Password and Re-enter email fields? In the case of an error with the e-mail, I think that you should ...


2

Maybe the speech-balloon could work: HTML Decimal: 💬 HTML HEx: 💬


1

Marketing plays a huge role in the color palette that you use, which in turn may bring up limitations on what colors you can use. As most marketers know, colors evoke certain emotions and also have very different meanings in different countries. Here's a link to a helpful resource: https://www.helpscout.net/blog/psychology-of-color/ In terms color choices ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible