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57

Remember 0.1, 1.0, and 10 seconds... You have about 1 second to show something whether that be the finished result or an indicator that the computer is working (usually some type of spinner) Not doing anything for 1 whole second after a user initiates an action can still make an application feel sluggish (as noted in the comments below) so I like to ...


49

The fewer words the better, and no words at all are better than negative words. Don't say why you think there might be a problem, or even that you think there is likely to be a problem. Instead just make it easy for them to contact you in the event that they do happen to come across a problem. I quite liked an experience I had recently at surfdome where it ...


41

Answer "No". "Successfully" can be removed: Joel Spolsky covered this issue very well here: http://www.joelonsoftware.com/uibook/chapters/fog0000000062.html The basic rule of thumb is that: "In fact, users don't read anything. This may sound a little harsh, but you'll see, when you do usability tests, that there are quite a few users who simply do ...


20

Understanding and sharing your users thoughts and pain points Become an advocate! Key in this area is conducting frequent usability testing and inviting both users and business stakeholders to witness the process so all the relevant people can identify more forcefully and empathise with end users: Usability testing is sometimes seen as an ...


17

You don’t know the weight of this information or how to compare it to other data. From that perspective it is useless for your own research. But don’t throw it away, it is still real feedback so better take it seriously. Once you’ve gathered your own data, don’t mix it up with this low quality feedback but use it to see if there are similarities. The reason ...


16

There is another issue with the word "successful" that I experienced in our SaaS. We provide a function in our application, where you can send stuff via email. However, the only thing we do is to send the email. The message used to be "Email successfully sent." User feedback then made us realize that they got the message more or less wrong as they believed ...


16

I was going to post some answer about the user being too hasty or inept at using websites but after looking at your website I would like to gently point out some observations: Home-page posts appear mashed together and it takes more cognitive load than I am willing to spend in order to understand it. It also looks like there is some important info in some ...


13

Resolve the behavioral stumbling block You make a key observation that it's hard to get users to backtrack from a specific suggestion ("I want this button!") that they are psychologically anchored on. I agree. You can use reason and charm to get a user off a fixation on a specific UX suggestion, but the effort involved in doing that can result in ...


13

I suspect that people aren't clicking because giving feedback isn't what they are there to do - they are being contracted to perform data entry. You say you don't have direct access to the users. Do you know how they are being trained? It could be that their managers are being explicit about what they can and cannot do with the software (for instance, they ...


11

I use the term 'conditional input' to indicate that there are elements within the form that is conditional to the input provided by the user. I think appending the term 'conditional' in front of a UI element suggests that they are triggered by a particular condition. Remember that it is not necessarily the entire form that changes, but just specific ...


11

This is a very common problem. Many companies and other large organizations that offer a lot of support solve this by essentially requiring you to go through FAQ-like content before they even provide you with any way to contact them directly. Some take this to such lengths that it is very annoying for those of us who actually have a question not answered ...


11

I'm going to disagree with the others and say that sometimes the word successfully is meaningful. I agree that in many cases it is redundant and in those cases is not needed, however there are cases where it is useful. Mostly this applies in partial success cases or cases where you may expect an error. For example if you are validating a hard disk, then ...


11

The feedback button in the menu bar is a somewhat hidden and the meaning may actually be getting blurred to the user. Another problem may simply be that the users are there to do a job, and providing feedback is (unfortunately) not part of that. One issue is the close proximity to all the menus. If you scan the menu structure below (taken from my Chrome, ...


9

This won't fully answer your question since you already included part of the answer in your question :) For the part where the user (or the client in some cases) insists on "But I WANT a BUTTON", I have some useful techniques: I re-confirm the user/client problem. I shift him/her from proposing solution to identifying the problem. This may require a lot ...


9

I've tried to solve this same question in the past. Here's my solution. Keep it short. Direct them to activities. Focus the issue with a choice: "I'm trying to do something that's not currently possible" OR "I'm doing something and the app isn't doing what I expected" Ask about activities: "What were you trying to do when things went wrong?" This changes ...


6

I'm absolutely not going to answer your question. Which is a bit counter to the purpose of the site I know but hear me out... The iPhone 5S, regardless of your personal feelings on the device, is pretty solid. Solid enough that they've made a sequel no less! The iPhone 5S has a 4.0 / 5 rating on Amazon. But that's not a direct comparison is it? The iPhone ...


6

How do you think the word "successfully" affects the user experience? Is it something that should go away or is it all right to actually have the word in messages? Ambiguity "Operation X completed" can be ambiguous, for example: Microsoft SQL Server jobs produce messages like this when a job fails. Since the message doesn't always imply a successful ...


6

It seems to me that a bug tracking or issue tracking tool (i.e. JIRA, Bugzilla, YouTrack) could help here, especially if the colleagues can create issues there directly (and not have to route through you). You can create a sprint or category called Backlog or Archive or Attic. You can capture any and all feedback there, but cherry pick issues and move them ...


6

You can try changing the menu bar to "Suggestions?" with or without the question mark. Not to get too skeumorphic but users are familiar with the concept of a 'Suggestion Box' where you would drop in a letter with a complaint, suggestion for improvement, etc. How often do you see that labeled as a 'Feedback' box? If you are really getting zero feedback ...


5

"I can imagine tha you may get users to read by providing good button labels. If the button label is always "OK" then yes, noone will read anything and just click away. If your button labels provide the action or in Y/N dialogs something like "Yes, do it anyway" you probably have a better chance of people reading the text above (user thinks: "anyway? wait... ...


5

I don't think there is a different name for the form itself. The form is still a form - except that maybe it borders on becoming a survey! When you start creating the form you shouldn't need to decide whether you need a straight form or an 'adaptive form' - you should be able to decide at any point - and add or remove the logic at any time. You don't need ...


5

DaveAlger's answer seems to pretty much cover the question, but I would contend that if a process is wired up to display a progress bar, you might as well show it immediately in all cases. An hourglass says "something is taking a long time when we didn't expect it to". A progress bar-- even the fake barber-pole kind-- says "this is taking a while, but we ...


5

The worst thing to do is to redirect a user to a different page after a time-out. It's best to keep them within the same page and present them with a lightbox that informs them that their session has expired. This gives them the opportunity to re-login to continue working before being redirected to a different page. Regarding the discard of changes, this ...


4

You could dynamically show related questions from the FAQ when the user types in the contact form (this assumes you have a contact form instead of telling the users to send an email directly). You probably need to implement some sort of fuzzy search or look for certain keywords for this to work effectively. Stack Exchange does a similar thing in the Ask ...


4

Yes, it's good to inform users ...particularly if there are mixed links on the page (some open in new tabs and some don't). One popular way to denote new-tab links inline is to use an icon as follows: If you're developing using CSS, this can be done in a way that fails gracefully for text-only or accessibility browsers. You can insert an :after sprite, ...


3

Extending part of @dan1111's answer, one other option is adding context to your contact page. One example of this is what Github does under some particular conditions. Take this page for example. If you scroll down to the very bottom and press the "Contact" link in the footer, it takes you to the contact page however with one minor change. Basically, ...


3

My take: looking at the page I see video, text, weather, faq, trial flights, costs, competitions, learning, gallery, join, contact, learning, the club, search, advertisement, links to gliding pages, 10+ links to blog pages, upcoming events, support & fundraising. Reading another answer about cognitive overload, I agree, that it is a little ...


3

What other feedback channels are you using? In addition to App/Play Store reviews, you can solicit feedback in other ways. Feedback options in the app Through the company website Subscriber emails (if you send them) Social media In the Play Store copy & release notes. How are you currently soliciting feedback/reviews in the app? Some people ...


3

put in a "be the first to rate this product"-indicator and/or mark it as "unrated". I, personally, like to see the ratio - like youtube, amazon and others do. Either minimalistically by giving the number of total votes or by showing how many voted for what (thumbs up/down or 1-star, 2-star, ..).


3

Well, from a user's point of view, it's always better to show them the app is working hard instead of 'supposedly' crashing/stalling. Some games I've seen give this a comic note by showing messages like: Blurring Reality Lines Initializing Dastardly Schemes Atomizing Atomic Particles While this might not be the best choice for your specific app, this ...



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