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37

Answer "No". "Successfully" can be removed: Joel Spolsky covered this issue very well here: http://www.joelonsoftware.com/uibook/chapters/fog0000000062.html The basic rule of thumb is that: "In fact, users don't read anything. This may sound a little harsh, but you'll see, when you do usability tests, that there are quite a few users who simply do ...


15

There is another issue with the word "successful" that I experienced in our SaaS. We provide a function in our application, where you can send stuff via email. However, the only thing we do is to send the email. The message used to be "Email successfully sent." User feedback then made us realize that they got the message more or less wrong as they believed ...


11

I'm going to disagree with the others and say that sometimes the word successfully is meaningful. I agree that in many cases it is redundant and in those cases is not needed, however there are cases where it is useful. Mostly this applies in partial success cases or cases where you may expect an error. For example if you are validating a hard disk, then ...


4

How do you think the word "successfully" affects the user experience? Is it something that should go away or is it all right to actually have the word in messages? Ambiguity "Operation X completed" can be ambiguous, for example: Microsoft SQL Server jobs produce messages like this when a job fails. Since the message doesn't always imply a successful ...


4

"I can imagine tha you may get users to read by providing good button labels. If the button label is always "OK" then yes, noone will read anything and just click away. If your button labels provide the action or in Y/N dialogs something like "Yes, do it anyway" you probably have a better chance of people reading the text above (user thinks: "anyway? wait... ...


2

To add on to Phillips answer, the only time that a user needs to read information within a verification system would be when something atypical has occurred. So for example in a successfully completed action, the only indicator a user needs is to know everything has gone as expected. Even something as simple as the text "Complete" or "Thanks" with either a ...


2

In talking to an end user, I don't see any action being unsuccesful 'and' completed. Not with those words anyway. But I do want to point out that it 'is' logical in certain cases. When doing asynchronous calls for example in programming there is a clear difference between success, error and complete. A call will always be completed, albeit succesfull or ...


1

This question is similar to something I recently implemented which has had success. Because I am unaware of the time required to process the request your users are clicking - I will try to give a few broad options. I will try to give answers that do not require building a dashboard or a completely new UI. Cost can drive up quickly doing so. The link ...


1

Some ideas: After clicking the link, disable it so it can't be clicked again. Enable it again when it makes sense for it to be clicked again (if the process completes or fails). Display an indicator near the link to show that the process is in progress. This could be a simple spinner or throbber, a loading bar, a "please wait" message, etc. When the ...


1

Ideas for you: User clicks on a link and a mini "request sent" status gets displayed next to the link If user stays on the page/page gets refreshed, the status next to the link updates to show the current status If user performs a lot of these long process time actions, consider putting together a dashboard where they can review status of all processes in ...


1

Two simple suggestions for you: Display some form of loading image at the side of the button, indicating that there is some processing going on. This will ensure that the user does not click on the button multiple times for fear that the button is not working. Once done, you can easily hide this loading image. Change the text of the button to 'loading...' ...


1

My opinion on your specific phrase: "Operation successfully completed" is that the successfully word is not needed because the completed already has intrinsically on it the meaning of having success. If your phrase was "Operation successfully made" or "Operation successfully done" I would not remove the successfully word.


1

We need to look at the use case and environment. A few examples: ATM machine uses sound and asterisk/dot to provide feedback. This is pretty much everywhere. Normal web form for most desktop environment uses asterisk/dot. Here, the user is assumed to have good and stable control of he keyboard and knows what they are typing. Wifi password prompt in ...



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