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56

Remember 0.1, 1.0, and 10 seconds... You have about 1 second to show something whether that be the finished result or an indicator that the computer is working (usually some type of spinner) Not doing anything for 1 whole second after a user initiates an action can still make an application feel sluggish (as noted in the comments below) so I like to ...


13

I suspect that people aren't clicking because giving feedback isn't what they are there to do - they are being contracted to perform data entry. You say you don't have direct access to the users. Do you know how they are being trained? It could be that their managers are being explicit about what they can and cannot do with the software (for instance, they ...


12

Resolve the behavioral stumbling block You make a key observation that it's hard to get users to backtrack from a specific suggestion ("I want this button!") that they are psychologically anchored on. I agree. You can use reason and charm to get a user off a fixation on a specific UX suggestion, but the effort involved in doing that can result in ...


11

The feedback button in the menu bar is a somewhat hidden and the meaning may actually be getting blurred to the user. Another problem may simply be that the users are there to do a job, and providing feedback is (unfortunately) not part of that. One issue is the close proximity to all the menus. If you scan the menu structure below (taken from my Chrome, ...


9

This won't fully answer your question since you already included part of the answer in your question :) For the part where the user (or the client in some cases) insists on "But I WANT a BUTTON", I have some useful techniques: I re-confirm the user/client problem. I shift him/her from proposing solution to identifying the problem. This may require a lot ...


8

I've tried to solve this same question in the past. Here's my solution. Keep it short. Direct them to activities. Focus the issue with a choice: "I'm trying to do something that's not currently possible" OR "I'm doing something and the app isn't doing what I expected" Ask about activities: "What were you trying to do when things went wrong?" This changes ...


6

You can try changing the menu bar to "Suggestions?" with or without the question mark. Not to get too skeumorphic but users are familiar with the concept of a 'Suggestion Box' where you would drop in a letter with a complaint, suggestion for improvement, etc. How often do you see that labeled as a 'Feedback' box? If you are really getting zero feedback ...


4

DaveAlger's answer seems to pretty much cover the question, but I would contend that if a process is wired up to display a progress bar, you might as well show it immediately in all cases. An hourglass says "something is taking a long time when we didn't expect it to". A progress bar-- even the fake barber-pole kind-- says "this is taking a while, but we ...


3

Yes, it's good to inform users ...particularly if there are mixed links on the page (some open in new tabs and some don't). One popular way to denote new-tab links inline is to use an icon as follows: If you're developing using CSS, this can be done in a way that fails gracefully for text-only or accessibility browsers. You can insert an :after sprite, ...


2

There's two issues here to address: getting a proper understanding of what the suggested change is supposed to accomplish, and avoiding resistance or frustration from the customer because "why are you asking me about the problem, when I've already told you what you need to do to fix it?". In my experience it is extremely difficult to resolve this well ...


2

I'm sure this is going to upset several people but here it goes. I personally believe that this is not a user issue. A user is not going to have insightful UX requirements and this is the reason that there is a need for your expertise. Even the most educated people, which have used computers for 20+ years, struggle with computers and the internet as a ...


2

1 second is a long time at work. 400ms might be better. longer than this is often identified as "laggy" and calls performance into question. One of the applications I worked on some 20 years ago waited on transactional data from a server that typically took 15-25 seconds to arrive in extreme cases (9600b/s multi-drop line). On the window concerned the ...


2

From a UX perspective, there are things that could be done to help the user experience by not setting pointer-events to none. Showing disabled fields to a person is sometimes cruel. If the rules for why the field is disabled are complex and not obvious from the screen layout, it is like holding a carrot just out of reach of the person trying to use the ...


2

I think if the link will be redirecting to a different site, then it's helpful to convey this information to the user by means of an icon. The second icon in the question is apt for such cases. If the link will be redirecting to same site on the domain, then opening the link in new tab is not required. For plain text links, a small icon just next to the ...


1

I would not use pointer-events:none; on a disabled button. It's better to manually set the cursor and hover effect to the default/disabled state. In some cases it's useful to add a tooltip to a disabled button; pointer-events none would disable this. I've added a use case for pointer-events:none; below if your interested.. Pointer Event Use Example ...


1

What about renaming the button as "Feedback/Support" And, setting up that sub-form to effectively gather what's going on. E.g. What's going "wrong", why is it frustrating, are additional features needed, etc. Also try to see if it's your product vs how they are being trained... Make it also clear to the Vendors/Contractors (i.e. the companies that utilize ...


1

Speaking from personal experience: the only time users want to talk to you is if they're having a bad experience. Also, I think you're right in thinking that "Feedback" possibly isn't the best term to use. It's just too broad. My immediate thought is to add a start screen that the user must dismiss to start using the app - like Adobe use when there is no ...


1

It is all relative. If it is a database application with millions of records a user will (should) have a different expectation. My approach is for anything that might take longer than 1 second is to display an hour glass AFTER 1 second. I like to keep visual clutter down. If it is a task that can take more than 10 seconds and you can display actual ...


1

Couldn't it be a simpler choice? A spinner or rotating hourglass, as you put it, for operations where the length of the operation is undefined by factors outside of your control, network latency etc... A progress bar for a defined operation i.e. we know we have to read 480 records from a database and can easily convert this into a percentage read figure. ...


1

I completely agree with tohster on this issue. What a great response. I'd post this as a comment, but I don't have enough reputation yet. I've used the "S-T-P" approach, which I see as the core of tohster's solution. That is, Situation Target Proposal Situation Start with the current situation. What are you doing today? How are you doing it? What ...



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