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15

UX isn't just about doing what the user wants, or even what the user needs. Good UX requires taking many elements into consideration. For example: Business Requirements - Does this requirement help achieve any measurable business benefit? Does giving every customer a free cup of coffee directly increase the number of actual sales you make? Technical ...


6

Because the image and text are differently in each case I would do the following. 1st grouping I would only use that in an aligned left scenario 2nd grouping I would have to use this in a centered design 3rd grouping I would use this only when floating like elements next to each other.


4

I haven’t heard of any study about your question. But I can only base my opinions on readability issues, for this specific case. (See image) For the big paragraph text, is easier to read when aligned to left . It makes it a clear paragraph. Your 3rd option shows the typical “teeth” that annoys the readability. Also not applied in print design for such big ...


4

Is any data connected to the login account? Then yes. People want to keep their stuff when they change email just like when they move houses. Is there no data connected to the login account? Then why have a login at all?


2

The e-mail address is a way for you to notify/warn/inform users outside their account. If users prefer to use a different address for that kind of communication, let them change it. So from UX perspective I would call it essential. For accounts that use an email address as login name you can give the option to add antoher e-mail address for notifications ...


2

For an existing product, you have two primary modes of working on new features: 1. Optimization When optimizing an existing product to the needs of it's user base, or to extend into adjacent markets, research into real user behavior is critical. You would be hunting primarily for pain points, under-used features, and workflow gaps. You can guess based on ...


2

I would argue that they are indeed very relevant and I personally find them extremely useful in an enterprise environment. If there is no concept of state, what happens when you send a message and expect an immediate response? If you know the user is busy, your expectations are set: "Ah ha they are busy/away/offline, I might not get a response straight away....


2

There's a big difference depending on how you do this. Frustration As you mention (just a link, and when they click the user finds out the feature doesn't exist yet) will probably create a lot of frustration and the potential loss of the visitor. Anticipation However, NOT HIDING it, but making it a prominent part of a page, will create a sense of ...


1

I think your next step here should be focusing on the improvement of the current features. If you have already discovered that "most calls point to issues that could be solved by improving current features, rather than introducing new ones," then adding new features doesn't make much sense here from a UX standpoint. Instead of wasting your, designers, and ...


1

You've answered your own question here (although, ahem, you might want to rephrase it into a question). User research shows that the priority is improving features you already have. Prioritise that before adding another feature. At the heart of great UX is a long, fiddly, detailed, often boring, Continuous Improvement Process


1

The answer is rather subjective and depends on what those features are. For example, if your app is in the MVP or Alpha stage and lacks important functionality such as Checking Sent Items in a Mail App. If your app lacks this feature and you decide to have an Action for it, saying Sent Items and show a message there that this feature is coming soon - It ...


1

Many people will want to save a copy of a web page that is an invoice / contains a reference number from an online purchase, rather than printing it off or waiting for the email confirmation (particularly older users tend to do this). Perhaps we can remove this option once all users have the expectation that they can always get back to such online data ...


1

I suppose online, offline and away are still relevant. I didn't include busy because busy and away both imply that the user is not available to attend to message. The difference between busy and away; Busy is user triggered, much like "do not disturb" but away is triggered by the app after the app idles for a period of time. Given an office setting, ...


1

Attention by differentiation? Theoretically, little bursts of color and unexpected shape in the inbox will help with open rates. That will depend on the audience. Think of the oft cited Millennials who speak emoji fluently. (One catch there, if the emoji makes sense to you, it's probably not cool any more.) Just test it There's only one way to find out. A/...


1

A successful product should be viable, feasible, useful and likable. The voting system ignores the viable and feasible dimensions of the product. Also, many users do not know which features will actually be useful. The voting system can help you determine only the likable dimension. I recommend you to create a coefficient based on the dimensions of ...


1

You apparently need 50 rep to comment, so I would just like to add to @riotgear's beautiful "context dependent" answer. You also asked about an "Acceptable amount of lines" I would say this is again dependent on context. Only this time, instead of it being around placement/surrounding, based on you user's viewing context: On the go, quickly scanning a ...


1

I've found HEART framework metrics proposed by Google very useful. If you start thinking along the guidelines offered by this framework you will be able to answer this question.



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