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27

I usually use brainstorming techniques to get to the terms/ideas. One example of such a process is: Find a large piece of paper. Draw 3 columns First column: Use free association to produce a list of words that come to mind when you think of the original concept. Set your mind to generating without judging, and set your goal to generate as many words as ...


27

Siri seems to be the spiritual but not functional successor to Clippy. A major difference is that people request Siri's help whereas Clippy imposed help upon you. Another interesting thing is that Clippy is an Embodied Agent. For decades people have thought "How cool would it be if using your computer was like talking to a person". From that thought they ...


16

I've been there and I approached it like this. I prefaced my pitch with some strong relevant examples of successful products that really illustrate the 'less is more' principle and some of the obvious usability issues that come with clutter - Steve Krug 101 stuff would help. I presented factual data that showed that certain features weren't even being ...


12

Try using psychology. We've been exploring social proof and set completion in our app to get people to try out more stuff. It boils down to keeping track of features they use and then suggesting that if they use one more, they'll complete some visible metric (like a badge, or a LinkedIn-style profile completion meter). We don't actually give them anything, ...


9

To me, the biggest problem with Clippy was that it was so damn patronising. As if it knew what you were wanting to do, and just had to help you. I did have it running, mainly because the animations kept me amused ( I am a simple person really ), not for the advice or comments, which I turned off. And, as @Ben says, it interrupted you doing x to tell you it ...


8

Usability is per user, per situation. The goal of UX is to maximize the quality of experience for the highest percentage of users. You can never please everyone with a particular choice; there is no single application interface that is perfect for everyone. The goal is to be good enough for the worst case, without hindering overly the best case. An example ...


8

If the exams option is always empty, then the users will (at some point, depending on the individual person) give up checking that menu option. If there is no mechanism in the application to draw the attention to new exams that appear, then you have a usability issue. Your suggestion is one way to indicate the "new items" idea, but it is not necessarily ...


7

Just to be slightly contrary... is there a possibility that the users aren't using them because they're not the right features? Where do the features come from? Who are they targeted at? What needs are they addressing? Can you tell a story to the users about the new feature where it's solving a problem that they have? If there are more features coming ...


6

What a great question! Absolutely. UX is not an inherent quality of a tool, be it a pen, a computer system, or anything else. It is an emergent quality of the tool in its interaction with a specific user population, in a specific context. So your friends pen was great for him/her in a normal setting, but would have been awful if they were trying to use it in ...


6

Three things: 1) If your premise is true (IE users are less sophisticated) then it seems like you should draw the opposite conclusion - that you need the editing bar. An unsophisticated user will have less trouble using it than writing raw HTML in a text box. 2) I'm not sure what you're talking about when you refer to "complexity". Complexity of ...


6

Duplicating actions isn't always bad in my opinion. Especially not if they are not exactly the same from the users perspective. I think in the end, there is not one way to follow for everything. It is not do-not-duplicate versus duplicate-as-much-as-possible. Look at the case at hand and decide what the user might think here, what is their usual pattern, ...


6

Creating recognizable icons is a supreme royal pain in the boo-tocks. There is no analytic Process to follow that consistently yields decent icons. All you have are some vague guidelines from the usual style guides (e.g., Windows and Mac), which cover more the graphic style of the icons than the semantics. In my experience, if an immediately obvious icon ...


6

This is a difficult one to answer but there quite a few myths out there. For example the previous answer says... "For example, you may want people to use the mobile site to view all the products, but not necessarily to purchase or rate/review the products." This is based upon the idea that people browse products but don't go through the whole checkout ...


6

A component is a tool, in this case it's a piece of software. Many components and their relationships make a system. A feature is some functionality, that is what the tool does. E.g., "My system has a share-to component; it's written in python. Its features include sharing to personbook and whistler." Typically, you can install a component, as it's a ...


5

99% of the users didn't know how to use the features that were already there in the previous version, and had ZERO desire to learn something new and different much less get bugged constantly about how they were doing things that were wrong to begin with. They knew what they wanted to do and were doing how they wanted to do it. In their minds, Clippy caused ...


5

If you want to let people know that there are new features in a subtle way, simply mark them with something that lets them stand out from older features. That way you make use of a person's natural curiosity to get them to see what it is that makes it different. I would suggest using a sash / ribbon on the corner of whatever someone has to select to see ...


4

Printing is an expensive operation, requiring lots of time, ink and paper, so it's generally a good idea to assure users that they're getting what they want and confirm they are printing the right document (this can be an issue if they're printing from a file view interface where they could easily click the wrong file). That suggests a case for a print ...


4

I've come across a few websites that do something like that, and it seemed to work well. Experiment with the transitioning a bit and I'm sure it can work. It's nice to have the options available, but out of sight until "liked." There will be some people who want to "add to collection" or "share" but don't want to "like" it first. That's the only downside I ...


4

Who says redundancy is always bad? It's common to have menus, toolbars, and keyboard shortcuts that all do the same thing. If the duplicates don't each add something (i.e. they really are completely redundant), then it's time to remove something, but it might not be the bits you first think. In Gmail, reply is available above and below a message, because ...


4

As I understand your argument: "We don't offer formatting because IE users don't understand HTML". (Is that your intention?) Mistakes: As argued in a comment, I doubt the correlation you assume Even if such a correlation would exist, it is not static. You mix up feature and implementation: The feature you (want to) remove is rich text formatting. By ...


4

One approach could be to highlight new options with a different background or text colour. This will make the new feature stand out and the user will notice it (hopefully). Then you could have a tooltip or even popup that explains more about the new feature. This way the user will feel more in control. Don't forget to include an option for turning it off ...


4

I cant find any study which states that its the second most used navigation feature,but according to this study from Mozilla What is the most clicked Firefox button? in 2010, it was the most used navigation feature To quote the study By a landslide the 'Back' button was the most clicked of all navigation buttons which include the Back, Forward, ...


4

Offer the buttons regardless of whether a user has the privilige to use them. When a non-priviliged user clicks one, bring up a pop-up, thanking them for wanting to use it and offer them the way to get the privilige to actually do so. For example all StackExchange sites allow you to click vote buttons. When you are not logged in they bring up a pop-up to ...


4

I worked on the Information architecture for a similar app so here are some pointers which can help Define the primary objective of the app. I know its feature rich but it still will have a primary objective such as enabling hotel bookings or finding hotels Define the secondary objectives of the app Check how the app handles these primary and secondary ...


4

I see several aspects in your proposal that I would solve differently. "Flash cards" appears disabled, but is actually a valid option. That option currently appears as disabled as your "locked" option. I'd color all available options black, not gray, to avoid that. Show clearly which option is currently selected. It's always a challenge to show which one ...


3

Clippy's problems: 1) Invasive 2) Visually unappealing 3) Lacked UI integration with any of the other Office features To make it better: 1) Have Clippy be an obvious feature that can be enabled or disabled. Preferably the first time you run the program (and not with every new session). 2) Instead of randomly appearing and floating in the document, make ...


3

Clifford Nass says that Clippy behaves socially inappropriate, as it suggests the same help over and over again, effectively communicating that he "sees" the user for the first time. So instead of improving its algorithms to make it more intelligent, he used a different social pattern: whenever a user answered "No" to his question "Was this help useful?", ...


3

You certainly get the situation where two very distinct groups of might want differing information from a website:- A site which is primarily aimed at the general public, may also be used by a group of 'professional users'. Ideally the professional users get picked up at the intial design stage, get their own persona and get given their own way of viewing ...


3

There will always be a section of any user base that will hate a developer if they dare charge for anything. (Even if (as per your proposal) the charge is voluntary and those who aren't prepared to pay can still hitch a ride on the coattails of those who do; which is the problem that shareware has always had.) The people who fall into this category expect to ...


3

Basic steps to identify the minimum set of features that your app requires, involves identifying your users and their needs first. That helps shortlisting features at the end. If a feature doesn't help to achieve the most important goals (or outcomes) then you can leave it out or put in a backlog. Step 1: Define the Users (Personas) that will use your app. ...



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