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9

Requiring facebook is a bad idea. There is a significant number of people that don't use FB and there's no reason to exclude them. And others, even if they do use FB, prefer to register through other avenues (twitter, google+ etc.). Best to be as flexible and accommodating as possible, for both the immediate concern of acquiring registrations and the ...


6

Having two lists could create difficulties in scrolling. Also it's not a good way to divide friends on those who have the game and those who have no. The reason is in what drives me to play with someone. "A-ha! Is she so clever? Let's see!". So don't build the barrier. The better way is to display all the friends, adding clear signs of whether someone has ...


3

Fairly sure this is a duplicate question, but here's some research: http://blog.mailchimp.com/social-login-buttons-arent-worth-it/ Mailchimp, an application with hundreds of thousands of users tried to get people to sign up with social media buttons, and after a while noticed that it was having absolutely no impact on their sign ups. Instead of investing ...


3

Sounds like you need to research your audience and their reactions to Login with Facebook a bit more. Spotify received a great deal of negative feedback when they started forcing FB login as their only system. If you can identify lost opportunities as a result of imposing FB logins on users then you should provide an alternative, unless you're happy to let ...


2

If it's something your friends don't want to see, it'll be considered spam whether it's in a status update or via private message. With that in mind, however, there's benefits for each approach: If you share the survey as a status... Only your "Close Friends" will receive a notification about it, and even though it may look like spam to everyone else, ...


2

‘Liking’ something is easier for users than ‘Sharing’ it, mainly because casual Internet surfers don’t like to be burdened by the text box. But, sharing accompanied by a positive comment could potentially add more value to the webpage. Source: http://www.829llc.com/facebook-like-vs-facebook-share/ So 'liking' is a passive action, and 'sharing' is a more ...


2

Ask to invite people first and show people with app after. You could also suggest to invite friends after a while that the user still have the same amount of friends-with-app.


2

Twitter and Facebook buttons are intended to be different and it would be against either Twitter's and Facebook's branding guides to make them look similarly/the same. I also think it would be a bad idea to modify the original buttons, since people recognize them because they are the same on every other website - so if you change them, it may happen so noone ...


1

If you are going to store any state for the user (I can't imagine a useful service that doesn't do this), then you have to create an account in your own database that is linked to the Facebook account. Look at how Stack Exchange works when you log in with Facebook; it stores information about all your activity and lets you create your own Stack Exchange ...


1

To be on the up and up, you should notify the user of your intention and explain the benefit of auto creating an account for them. One benefit would be that if the user decides to delete their Facebook account, they should still be able to login with the account that you create for them, as long as the user is provided with login details.


1

It's a pretty common praxis to collect all the "linked" services in a common settings form. For un-linked services you should either remove the functionality, or you could disable it (with a message that describes why it is disabled). Eg. "Link to Foursquare if you want to add location". Example from Foursquare: Example from Path: Example from ...


1

I would take Tinder's lead on this. You already have a proven answer, like you said, they have many many users with high privacy concerns, and Facebook. Clearly their UX worked.


1

I'm going to try to answer this in a way that doesn't relate too much on the implementation. However as of a few weeks ago, Facebook now allows users to log into apps anonymously. This is definitely something you can take advantage of. While it is good to point out the things you will never need and never use, you should state what information you need and ...


1

Generally speaking it is best to get it by having the user type it in themselves. By connecting / linking your profile, you may end up with lower conversion ratings since the user may not want to give their personal information to an app. What you can do however if users do not know their username on Facebook, you can redirect them to ...


1

It appears that the workflow you experience is an acceptable, albeit frowned upon practice. I did find some additional information in the Developer documents indicating that the workflow you experienced may become unacceptable due to a new policy (FB docs indicate enforceable on April 9th, 2014 at 10am PST.) The document read as follows: As you mentioned ...


1

A similar question was asked on Quora. As @stewart-dean stated in an earlier comment, the primary reason seems to be that it helps to verify that a user entered their email address correctly. Passwords can always be reset. Incorrect email addresses cannot.



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