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27

I am going to disagree with you on this one. A logical structure to the site would match a users Mental Model, and by scattering the tabs in a seemingly random order this wouldn't equate to logical in my opinion. OK, eye tracking studies may show that the user bounces around the screen when they are looking at it, but I don't believe that is a reason to ...


17

Interesting theory based on mammalian visual processing, with significant implications not only for tabs but for any menu or list. It's also against just about every HCI standard and style guide I can find, many based on years of research and operational experience, going all the way back to MIL-STD 1472. Could they all be wrong? There’s pretty firm research ...


13

Its going to be really hard to respond to this question unless we can see a screenshot of what your interface or site currently looks like. However here are some reasons as to why you are not getting a 100 % right to left F pattern for your site: Your interface might not be totally right justified as explained by this article : Our usability studies ...


7

If you are using or have access to a Mac I highly recommend Silverback. Its cheap, effective and easy to use. To do eye tracking properly requires some really expensive specialist equipment and training to use the software and analyse the results. You might also want to check out some of the remote testing options such as TrymyUI. Also, in my experience ...


7

I can see the logic in what you're saying and this type of question is the stuff that really fascinates me... BUT Im not convinced either that the second most important tab is the last one in the list. What if you had a list of tabs that was say 6 or 7 items long. That's a lot of screen real estate for a user's eye to jump around over, and if they see a ...


6

I think that the eye tracker results can be explained by Don Norman's book Emotional Design, where he speaks of the three aspects of design: visceral, behavioral and reflexive. A good example is car driving: when you're learning, it's behavioral. You are being very careful of when and how you apply the brakes, both of your hands are firmly on the steering ...


5

I often use Webex - you can record interactions in person and over the web equally well. It works on most platforms. It's designed for meetings, but to use it for usability, you just start a meeting, have the participant join on their computer, and you join on your computer. You can view all of their actions, give them access to a prototype running on your ...


5

This will depend on the number of tabs, how they are displayed, their contents, and the user's inclination to read. With a lot of tabs, the user won't always read all of them. There's a lot of room to break the flow of reading. How tabs are displayed is a also a big factor because it determines how engaging it is to read the tab bar and how far the last tab ...


5

Not really. Frequency is one issue - but eye tracking is all about eye saccades. This is a mild oversimplification - hopefully folk won't mind. Hold your arm out and stick your thumb up. The size of top half of your thumb is roughly the size of the bit of your visual field that sees in 'high res' - the fovea. It takes up less than 1% of the retina area, ...


5

There is nothing wrong with putting the logo in the center. You're not going to implode anything. What you're fighting though is what is called the "f-shaped pattern". Nielson did a study in 2006 (which I believe you found, based on your comments above) that showed people tend to scan a page from left-to-right, top-to-bottom in a "f shape". ...


4

There's an effect in psychology with recalling lists of items, where people tend to remember the beginning and the end items - and tend to forget the ones in the middle. See diagram http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Serial_position_effect


4

The answer is: you don't know. And that is the exact reason why you have to avoid multi-column layouts. See this article: http://baymard.com/blog/avoid-multi-column-forms Quote: One of the problems with form fields in multiple columns is that your users are likely to interpret the fields inconsistently.


3

It seems the authors are making an implicit reference to the eye-mind hypothesis (see Google Scholar for literature references). In short, this means we can't assume that just because someone is looking at something they are paying attention to it -- this is why you need to set specific tasks in eye-tracking. In terms of peripheral vision, the structure of ...


3

Well I would arrange them vertically if I was to do this, because: It looks grouped. It's easy to read at one glance, and doesn't look scattered. It's easier to scan through, uncheck the default checked boxes. You are also amplifying the focus on a single part of the screen which is good. You should also have a look at this Documentation: ...


3

Here some Literature about Eye-Tracking: Duchowski, Eye Tracking Methodology: Theory and Practice, Springer 2007 (This explains the technical and scientifical approach behind the eye-tracking method in it's full scope. There's even a description of how to build your own linux interface to a tracking device) Nielsen/Pernice, Eyetracking Web Usability, New ...


3

I would suggest that you only bring attention to the checkout button at an appropriate time, such as after the user has added an item to the basket. Also that the checkout button area is more than just a button (see below). If the basket is empty, there's no point in drawing the eye to it every now and then - it distracts the user away from the ...


3

I was curious how accurate the machine is and tried to find some heatmap samples in the web. I found two and through the wayback archive the original website (with minor modifications). And here are the results: First Sample Analysed by Fen-Gui Hetamap found at normalmodes.com Second Sample Analysed by Fen-Gui Hetamap found at ...


3

Well, Feng-GUI.com tries to create a heatmap based on AI. The reliability has been discussed in other questions: Has anyone got experience of Feng GUI and been able to test it against real users?


2

Here's an interesting chart from Nielsen's site: To better understand when to use which method, it is helpful to realize that they differ along 3 dimensions: - Attitudinal vs. Behavioral - Qualitative vs. Quantitative - Context of Website or Product Use The following chart illustrates where several popular methods appear along these ...


2

In addition to attraction and gaze patterns, measuring the distance of eye movements can be helpful (such as eye movement distance between completing a task). A design that results in shorter eye movements is generally more efficient (see more in the book Measuring the User Experience). There is actually a formula to demonstrate this, but I can't remember ...


2

The last tab has more whitespace around it (on the right) and so is more noticeable and readable. So it's not surprising that the last tab has slightly higher clickthrough. So that's kind of interesting. But others have pointed out that there are other considerations to tab order, such as logic and conventions. If you're really concerned about users ...


2

Say the most important thing first and the least important last. Now I know this is far from tabs, but what users pay attention to is what they will remember the most and if a heat-map shows that the users look at the most right tabs after the first tab then why not put what we think is 2nd most important there - it will reduce their time to find it and ...


2

I have found an article on the topic finally: http://whatmakesthemclick.net/2010/01/23/… and here's the detailed research: http://journalofvision.org/content/9/10/6.full.pdf+html



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