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41

Just because your brand color is red doesn't make the use of red for errors obsolete, it's just a matter of extent. Take the Viaplay signup form for example: Viaplay has red as their main accent color, which is used throughout the website for actions buttons, icons, header, graphic elements etc.. however, in the form they do tone down the use. They ...


34

You have to go with the first option (stating that the "username or password is invalid"), and this has nothing to do with security. Let's say that I usually use JohnGB as my username, but on your service someone else has that username, so I use JohnGB123 instead. Say I've then forgotten my username and I enter JohnGB as my username, but use my correct ...


29

This is something that you have to be careful with, because you don't know what your users' state of mind is when your application is crashing. As always, it really depends on what kind of application you're writing, and how serious your users are likely to be about it. In the case of something like Google Chrome (as @Josh's answer contains), it's hard to ...


24

Many applications display humorous crash messages (see Chrome's "He's dead, Jim!"). The key here is that the application also provide means to the user to recover the application to some degree (reloading the page, learning more about errors, or sending feedback to Chrome). The ability for the user to do something about the crash, in addition to the ...


24

In general, using only color to indicate information is bad for accessibility reasons. Red/green colorblindness is the most common and occurs in 8% of males. Using an icon, like an X or warning sign, is the best way to go. If you must differentiate color for business reasons (i.e. people at the top think it should be a different color), then pick one that ...


19

The point of a good error page is to apologize for the error, explain what happened in layman terms, what might be responsible for this, and what next steps to take. Yet, error 500 rarely supplies a good explanation so the error page has to be vague. This results in users starting to refresh the page hoping it would miraculously render, even in cases of ...


16

HTTP error codes are primarily useful for support and debugging. In the early days of the internet, almost all users were technical, and so having them made a lot of sense. Today, it still makes sense having them visible, but that should not be the only information that you provide. Explain it like a human for the rest of the world to understand what ...


16

404 and 500 are most common error codes and 404 is the most famous one. If your target audience have exposure to computer as educational basis or a mid level surfer he/she will understand as what 404 means and not much of other status codes. Still it is not a good practice to display error codes as only or prominent way of communicating technical ...


15

Instead of using colors, draw visual emphasis through other means, such as using danger icons, font weight, and/or jagged outlines. Here's a an example, excessively using all three of these cues: EDIT: The comments below suggest that I didn't make it clear enough in my original post that using all three of these cues together would be excessive. (I'd ...


13

I'm going to give some advice from a Security standpoint + UX. I wouldn't sacrifice either one for the other. Have both. There's an important question of secure practices in your question. The Best Practice from a security standpoint is to not identify which entry was invalid, and have a generic answer. Let's ask What Would Google Do and take Google's ...


13

This was originally a comment, because I had assumed it was considered and not used prior to this question being posted.. At the moment, these are your URLs (with "summary" being a type of action, presumably): /region /region/{action}/{id} Your question is, what should you do if someone tries to access it without an ID, like this: /region/{action} I ...


9

My first thought is that most people will abandon the secondary naming scheme you assign each colour, and will probably call each state by its colour. The first real-world example of this behaviour that comes to mind is the American Department of Homeland Security's (discontinued) colour-coded threat level warning system. You will note that, even in the ...


9

I would go with option three: show both as separate messages. The reason is that it makes it clear to the user that there are two distinct system states as a result of their action. One of Jakob Nielsen's 10 Usability Heuristics is visibility of system status: The system should always keep users informed about what is going on, through appropriate ...


9

Looking at your form, I have a couple of concerns about your feedback mechanism You are relying too much on color to communicate content or feedback and a colorblind user might not be able to see the difference between the two forms and might wonder what is the error is. I just ran your "error image" against a color blindness checker and in two types of ...


9

Error information should be tailored to the audience that needs to take action on the error. If it is the user, the user needs to get a user-friendly or at least user-understandable accounting of what the error is and what is expected of him. Nobody would expect ALL users to know what "404" means. If it is the systems administrator, or the network ...


8

You state that your application would have limited functionality, even if this "error" occurs. Thus any over-eager error reporting is likely to interfere with the limited-functionality version of the application, either by obscuring it or by accidentally convincing the user that something went wrong and the app is now non-functional. I would advise against ...


7

I guess there are no rational reason to treat a 500 differently than any other error. However, when an error is within the 5xx range you may run into any of the following issues: The server configuration is invalid—not just affecting the current resource but the entire site, thus rendering a main menu useless (it's just a link to a lot of other error ...


7

It depends on who "the user" is. HTTP error codes are definitely cryptic and unhelpful to users using a browser. Different web servers will each have their way of displaying these pages, with varying levels of user-friendliness out of the box. In most cases web developers can override these, but many times this will only be done for the most common ...


7

There is, I believe, research on making error messages more lighthearted and accessible (I recall having read it some point in the last 7 years of researching, but cannot recall where). The thing is, an error message displayed to the user should indicate that a problem occurred that was out of the control of the system. It should provide any relevant ...


7

I think it's ok to make guesses about where your users were trying to go, but always provide the correct HTTP response code to indicate that the item was not found or was "Permanently Moved" and consider showing a simple message on the page in case the user really was trying to go somewhere they thought was legitimate and are confused why you redirected ...


6

I think it's a really good idea to provide navigation or a search capability on an error page, because once the user realizes that something has gone wrong her next thought will most likely be "what do I do now?". We, as designers, can and should help the user make that decision. This example from Carsonified is one of my favorites: The tone might not be ...


6

Option 2 objection As an iOS(iPhone, iPad, iPod) user, and I know that is not everybody, an "X" to right on the inside of a form field indicates first of all that if I click/tap the "X" it would clear the field. I recommend to add that functionality if you go with option 2. That being said I respond better to Option 1 because my initial take is that it is ...


5

If it as an internal website, then 'yes' display an error, something like the following: Data is currently unavailable; Currently unavailable; No data available, error 1234 Even follow it with an error code that you and your team will recognize, so if someone in the company reports it to you or another of your team, then you'll know exactly what it means ...


5

I believe it is best the first example, but without the error icon, just the color field, which is best because it highlights the error in form. As an example this is how the image registration Twitter. And this is another very interesting example, in this link GWT Bootstrap


5

IMO neither of your candidates is strong enough. The user shouldn't have to look for the field with error, it should be very obvious. And you probably should place the text about the error (e.g. "Doesn't look like an email address", "Password doesn't match" etc.) next to the field. Above all fields works fine for short forms but it gets quite problematic ...


5

It's true that error codes are not user friendly at all, but it's up to web designers must do a complete job and provide appropriate pages for error conditions. Twitters 502 error page:


5

Yes you can, but it will not help you much. What you need is information on what was happening when an exception was thrown in your code. In many cases, users can't even provide you the information you need, because they have no idea what is going on in the code. In other cases, they do have relevant information (e.g. what they were clicking when the error ...


4

If errors are clearly indicated, then users can assume that a task that is not marked as an error did complete successfully. However, if most users may have never seen the record for an errored task, then this confusion could occur. Here are my two suggestions, and in my opinion, you should utilize both, but one should be be sufficient: Change 0 seconds ...


4

@Barfieldmvs response is probably the right way to go about it - show an "updating" state while the ajax call is in progress, and clear this when there is a successfull ( or failed ) response back. The advantage of this is that, should the ajax call die without any form of response, there is a clear indication that something is wrong, as the "updating" state ...


4

I had a similar problem in one the native apps that I am designing and I ended up categorising the internet connection errors in two groups in terms of user experience. 1. Internet connection errors that appear when opening the app for the first time My proposal is to handle these errors with error screens (most of the apps that I benchmarked are doing ...



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