New answers tagged

-1

Black text on an ORANGE background would be good to alert the user. Orange is widely associated with a problem, and gives more contrast than red with the pink form background.


6

Building off of several other answers: Never only rely on color. Adding an icon or text or texture not only helps colorblind people, but also makes things a bit easier for regular-seeing people. Using a dark grey or black bar gives a strong contrast with the background. It's also color neutral so you can put other kinds/colors of notifications in those ...


12

You might try adding a white border, then play with the background color. The one color that communicates 'something is wrong' louder than red is the color of death, black.


2

Referring to the comments on your questions, I disagree with your assessment (that putting messages below fields is bad for usability), and think that @timster is on the money. Put the error message below the inputs, or use encapsulated flags This is arguably more conventional than putting them above. This question What is best practice for designing form ...


20

The standard color for error messages is red, see this question : One important point to understand is that using conventional colors for errors is important because they make the errors more noticeable. User being annoyed by the color of error message is lot less of a problem than user not being able to complete the form because they didn't ...


3

The question actually provided a lot of the alternate options available, but for clarity I thought it would be good to summarize some of the answers provided: Find a complementary colour to use that will stand out - there are plenty of tools for this, and you can also consult the branding guidelines as a secondary check; this could be for the UI, the font ...


54

I would go with something in the shade of the background, but have a more red text in the alert. You can add a border in the shade of the text to make it stand out as an error more, as well.


65

I feel bad that you have to work with this background color. Oof, i just can't even wrap my head around how that decision came to pass. At any rate, if that's not a variable you have influence over then I'd go with a color that'll always retain stark contrast. I'd also avoid venturing too far outside of the styles that that users are generally familiar ...


-1

You could also try a light red background for the alert:


40

A bright yellow background with black text would work well. Fits the colour scheme of a warning sign.


15

That's an accessibility nightmare! Try reversing your error message styles: Red text on a white background.


2

There are many existing guidelines on displaying information messages to the user (whether it is by modal window, toast notification or some other method), but the general principle is that it should help solve a user's problem or help them achieve their goal. So you should ask the question: "What is the user expecting to be able to do when they click this ...


4

Nothing. If you have no content, you shouldn't display a modal at all, simply create a conditional like `if $content=true -> $modal=true; else $modal=false` otherwise you'll be creating unnecessary friction. Remember that modals are intrusive, so they must be used sparingly. If you don't have nothing to show, then you don't need a modal. However ...


1

If messages are going to be logged to any sort of file, having a consistent form can make parsing easier. Further, if the number of operations performed is apt to be of interest, one may simultaneously solve single/plural issues and make it easier for the user (or a parsing utility) to find that number of one writes the notification as:Operation successful. ...


3

There isn't a consistent pattern, but it is clear that the best experience is to be explicit in your confirmation. However if that is not technically feasible, then use non-specific copy that is equally applicable to single or plural actions By saying message(s) it makes the user think about whether that was a singular or plural. Example In a scenario of ...


0

I feel answer 2 is the best option but it needs some minor tweaks. With error message include the info on how and when can reschedule the appointment. So that user feel comfortable with the flow of changing appointment.


23

How about pushing the development team to use some logic? Based on the selected records - let them switch the string of feedback message. For instance, if the user selects only one record to delete, the system should understand it and show a message as 'The message has been deleted'. If the user selects multiple records to delete, the system should show ...


0

The trends in the industry is to be clear about the action the user took. If you want to be generic, rewrite it to say something like, "successfully deleted." And don't make the user have to click OK, display if for a few seconds and perhaps with an undo button to allow the user to recover from an erroneous mistake.


0

So if it's the business rule it's obvious to follow, but considering the JOURNEY OF USER here is what you can do: First approach - Show them the link of changing appointment, cause I believe we are giving them the flexibility with this feature. Reaction of user - The user has viewed the link, he is educated and is satisfied to know the same, so far. ...


0

I wouldn't show nothing and prevent the user from continuing - That will only create confusion and frustrate the user. The best method for handling user errors is preventing them in the first place. You can't always do this entirely but usually there is something you can do, build some logic in your application that means the user won't have to deal with ...


3

Train your users Start by letting your users know how to use the system, and define some common notices. For example: Explain the process Now, you can tell them that if they do something unexpected, they won't be able to do the task. You can also add a right click notice to explain EXACTLY what is wrong (and of course, tell them "right click on element for ...


0

Perhaps a div at the top or bottom that expands when an error has been detected, and collapses when a new selection is made or a close button has been pushed? Animation, color choice, and sizing would be key to ensure that it's noticed, but isn't overly obtrusive.


20

As a general principle, I always think of error messages as inferior design/ UI, which in most cases can and should be avoided. If the user interaction triggers an error message, why would the UI allow users the option in the first place? Examples: error message "password is not good enough" -> better: live indicator to signal password strength error ...


1

The most appropriate way in my opinion should be, disable the reschedule button and an informative message already written next or below the reschedule button telling user that the appointment cannot be rescheduled since the time left in their appointment is less than 24 hours, or whatever the condition applies.


1

In general, in any validation process, the validation should be taken before the action performed. So, you have to check for file existence before uploading process, then cancel the upload for the existing file and notify the uploader.


4

Show a notification and eventually an error. Keep your interface consistent and show the link. You can simply disable it and show a notification. It won't be annoying if it's friendly and informative. On the contrary, it would do your users a favor! It doesn't create misleading expectations with a working link or confusion by hiding the link all of a ...


4

How about the approach in Windows and OS X when copying files/folders? Validate before the file is uploaded, and give the option to the user what they want to do with duplicates: replace, skip, or rename/keep both. Windows 8 OS X


3

I don't think you should ever present an error message until the user actually triggers one. Eg I hate when sites trigger a validation error for a required field that I either clicked on or tabbed through but didn't enter an invalid value into yet. Thus in your case I would only show a note/warning/error message if the user tried to pick a datetime that ...


1

I would opt to option 2, but without showing the message explicitly. Just disable the link and put information message into its title attribute, so that the user sees it upon hovering the link. In this way only those who did want to cancel an appointment would receive the information. Additionally, you could place ? sign with a similar 'disabled' ...



Top 50 recent answers are included