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0

I wouldn't show nothing and prevent the user from continuing - That will only create confusion and frustrate the user. The best method for handling user errors is preventing them in the first place. You can't always do this entirely but usually there is something you can do, build some logic in your application that means the user won't have to deal with ...


3

Train your users Start by letting your users know how to use the system, and define some common notices. For example: Explain the process Now, you can tell them that if they do something unexpected, they won't be able to do the task. You can also add a right click notice to explain EXACTLY what is wrong (and of course, tell them "right click on element for ...


0

Perhaps a div at the top or bottom that expands when an error has been detected, and collapses when a new selection is made or a close button has been pushed? Animation, color choice, and sizing would be key to ensure that it's noticed, but isn't overly obtrusive.


0

As a general principle, I always think of error messages as inferior design/ UI, which in most cases can and should be avoided. If the user interaction triggers an error message, why would the UI allow users the option in the first place? Examples: error message "password is not good enough" -> better: live indicator to signal password strength error ...


1

The most appropriate way in my opinion should be, disable the reschedule button and an informative message already written next or below the reschedule button telling user that the appointment cannot be rescheduled since the time left in their appointment is less than 24 hours, or whatever the condition applies.


1

In general, in any validation process, the validation should be taken before the action performed. So, you have to check for file existence before uploading process, then cancel the upload for the existing file and notify the uploader.


1

Show a notification and eventually an error. Keep your interface consistent and show the link. You can simply disable it and show a notification. It won't be annoying if it's friendly and informative. On the contrary, it would do your users a favor! It doesn't create misleading expectations with a working link or confusion by hiding the link all of a ...


4

How about the approach in Windows and OS X when copying files/folders? Validate before the file is uploaded, and give the option to the user what they want to do with duplicates: replace, skip, or rename/keep both. Windows 8 OS X


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I don't think you should ever present an error message until the user actually triggers one. Eg I hate when sites trigger a validation error for a required field that I either clicked on or tabbed through but didn't enter an invalid value into yet. Thus in your case I would only show a note/warning/error message if the user tried to pick a datetime that ...


1

I would opt to option 2, but without showing the message explicitly. Just disable the link and put information message into its title attribute, so that the user sees it upon hovering the link. In this way only those who did want to cancel an appointment would receive the information. Additionally, you could place ? sign with a similar 'disabled' ...


1

Your use cases list out a perfect opportunity to move to an offline first implementation by using service workers. You can get started by reading more here: http://offlinefirst.org/ , but the overall sentiment is to cache some parts of your application on the user's side, and let the application handle failures more gracefully by waiting to post until ...


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You could have the app check the signal strength and accordingly give out a message. For E.G If the network is strong and there still is a timeout, you could show something like this Looks like the server is taking to long to respond, please try again in sometime . If the network is weak, you could show something like this Looks like you ...



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