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Not just about modal errors, but errors in general: Is it an error that prevent the user from continuing using of the application? Is it an error that resulted in loss of data? Is is an error that is not likely to be overcome by silently retrying? If all of these questions are a 'no', then there is no point in explicitly showing the error to the user. A ...


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The other answer you mention states that modal dialogs distract the user. Therefore it is inadvisable to use them during the normal user workflow. However, if there is an event that is both (a) uncommon, and (b) important, then modal dialogs are entirely appropriate. Server errors may fall into this category depending on how infrequent and important they ...


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The fact that nothing happens when a user hits CTRL+V with an empty clipboard or invalid data is the feedback. Adding a message won't provide the user with any additional information that they can act on and thus is unnecessary.


2

I think that the best way to show non important errors is using a toast. Toast are non intrusive with user actions, shows a small message and fades in a short time.


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Apart from that the user surely will notice that nothing actually was pasted, the system warning sound could be helpful. Please don't use the error sound, since this isn't a system error - but a warning sound would enforce the feedback to the user, along with your fading message of an empty clipboard.


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The purpose of an error message is to help the user who encountered it, to learn how to avoid the behavior that caused the problem. The program has encountered a situation that it can not handle, and needs to tell the user, so that the user (or someone else) can arrange to avoid the situation that the program can not handle. The error an unexpected error ...


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What I would consider most important would be what should happen if a clueless user accidentally stumbles upon an unusual but important flaw in your system. If he or she produces an incorrect result after a series of steps that could potentially be difficult to recreate, you don't want to further complicate the debugging process by giving them a cryptic ...


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Since your question invites us to share what we would personally prefer, my favorite ones are those that : remain friendly, i.e. not too apologetic but strong and friendly at the same time, e.g. those that will say "We're afraid something went wrong..." in a way that does not mean "We're sooo sorry, something broke because we are real dummies... ...


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The situation you are working on relates to the more general issue of managing conflicts in a multi-user transactional system. Before crafting the best and most polite message, you need to make sure you have chosen a crystal clear conflict resolution policy that makes sense in your context and that you and your users are comfortable with. note 1 : I ...


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Although it means writing a lot more code, you should try to prevent the user from making those errors. The most popular example is the password field: as long as the password is too short, ther will be hint on it and the "save" button is greyed out. If the user can't add new items, tell him before he tries to add a new one. Also always tell the user what ...


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I would recommend a page error message, not included in the layout but as an overlay, that is strongly visible and disappears after a while.


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Instead of an error list, place each error by its UI control If the errors and warnings you refer to are all related to UI elements on the screen somewhere, then it would be useful to have all the errors located by the UI elements they relate to; so if there's a problem with the third checkbox in the seventh tab, put the warning by that checkbox. The ...


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I guess with any content and interaction with the user, you can take either one of two approaches. The first is to show what is required to resolve any issues that will impact on the user's workflow, and allow them to discover additional details as required (progressive disclosure). The alternate approach is to show everything upfront and reduce the content ...


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I thing that the solution depends heavily on your application design and visual architecture. However what i can think of is a kind of a variation of the error list from VS. If there're errors you could have a notification on the top of the window: Which could then be expanded if needed: When user clicks on one the item on the list, he gets navigated ...


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I have seen this done many times with a message console window within the app (like your visual studio screenshot). If you want to go down this route, but don't want to take up space by having the message console always visible, you could keep it hidden by default (can be opened from the view menu), and display a toast alert to notify the user of an error / ...



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