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1

How much data (size) are we talking about? And does the data have to stay on the device once it it sent to the server, can it be deleted afterwards? I think an elegant way to handle warning the user that they are running out of space is to leave an os notification where you can let them know that your application will stop working unless data is cleared. ...


-1

The other answers explain why autocorrect is bad. But you are correct about users being really bad at typing their own email address, so here's an alternate solution: Make them enter their email address twice, just like when setting a new password. Even if they are lazy and copy-paste it, hopefully they will at least look at it again and have a chance to ...


1

Depends on How smart is your checking? Relatively speaking a list of typo's is unsophisticated. There are services that can determine the presence of a valid Domain Name record an email server an individual email box Certainly in the case 1 above, if there is no matching Domain Name Record - then an email can not reach the recipient. So in this case ...


1

I wouldn't personally recommend auto correcting the email address' domain name, but you could check it against the "VALID" domain name extension, and for that you need to check it against list of valid domain name extensions which would be an absolute pain, specially nowadays that we have new and totally weird domain name extensions, here is a link to all of ...


0

People sometimes intentionally obscure their contact information online, e.g. by l33t-ing a few characters. One more reason not to do it.


9

Definitely don't silently change the address without telling the user, as this can lead to extreme confusion if it guesses wrong. Instead, you might consider a "Did you mean...?" message underneath the field. This is easily understood by any user who has done a Google search. Mailgun has a service for doing exactly this. They have an online demo. In ...


7

How about an ajax request real-time to check if the submitted domain is valid or not? If it's valid, presume it's right. If you can't find an MX or A record at that domain, state "could not find this domain" or suggest a "did you mean" mined from past records you kept about what users changed the input from and to all the previous times you "could not find ...


2

I think its useful to separate common typing errors from spelling mistakes. auto-correct might not be relevant for correcting domain names as @Simwil suggested because of changes to domain name extensions. This being said, if we are looking solely at auto-correcting typing errors this would enhance the overall user experience and minimise user frustration by ...


2

Autocorrect is somewhat invasive, and sometimes doesn't let user understand what was the typo or notice it at all. I would opt for typeahead (autosuggest) dropdown saying "Did you mean correct address?".


67

I would recommend against an auto-correct as domain name extensions are about to change drastically, to the point where an email ending with "sitename.anything" will be valid. Consider an inline check, which means it doesn't cause the frustration of the usual ENTRY > SUBMIT > ERROR MESSAGE > RE-ENTRY > SUBMIT name@company.co [!] Did you mean .com? Asking ...


10

I would lean towards not using Auto-correct in this instance as it can lead to more frustration than presenting an error message. The reason I say this is with the increase of domain names the accuracy of auto-correct becomes less and less. Your example is changing the .con to .com, what if the user's intention was to write .cn or .co? Form field error ...


0

It should be an information dialog. You're informing the user of something they didn't know. It is not an error. If you're a human and someone hands you a form with "W" in the "age" field, do you yell at them "Error! You gave me a bad age!", or do you politely ask "I don't understand what you wrote in the age field, can you tell me your age"? Bad input ...


0

Hiding the incompatible file types completely will cause confusion. Users will wonder if they picked the wrong folder and may spend a while looking for this missing file before they realise it can't be used. The best option would be to show all the files, but grey out the incompatible ones and make them 'unclickable'. Therefore it's immediately clear that ...



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