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0

Not providing specific error messages can come to bite you in the end, when some bug in your JavaScript code causes an invalid submit and the only diagnostic you have is an e-mail from a user saying it said ‘Generic error.’


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Don not worry about users who disable javascript in the browsers. It depends on the back-end framework and API you follow. Will anyone else use your API? If yes : Answer will be Yes you need to make the error message more specific. If NO : Answer will be NO since your UI is the sole user of the back-end and your your UI has got all the validations done ...


2

Yes, you should give specific error messages! In a perfect world, errors would never happen. Unfortunately, we do not live in a perfect world. Errors can happen, and let me tell you that by far, the most irritating thing to come out of an error is a generic message such as "An error has occurred!" The one product that I've seen this happen the most in is ...


1

No (but...) The critical points are that the app requires JavaScript to function and you're not intending to support a non-JS fallback mode of operation. Having said that, you may need to consider accessability issues for users using screen-readers, etc, and may need to revisit the decision regarding non-JS support, in which case you'll need to supply a ...


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From comment and reply above: If a user must go out of his way so as to pass client-side validation but fails server-side validation as a result of putting javascript in a field then we're truly talking about an edge case. – Mayo @Mayo We are. And that's why I'm asking if it's really necessary to provide detailed errors in such a scenario. – ...


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The difficulty is that you're trying to portray 2-dimensional information (type of error against the time it happens) using a single dimension (light on/off over time). As others have pointed out, if possible, find another way. WiFi and a web interface is probably a good one. If you must use a single LED for multiple errors, I would suggest as follows: A ...


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This is a very common situation with client-side validation In a world with no budget or time constraints, yes...of course users would be better off with more information. In the real world, you probably have far better priorities. The only time when users would see a server-generated form error is: (a) if your client-side JS is broken (in which case, ...


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Yes, you should provide server-side validation along with client-side validation Client-side validation allows you to provide feedback as quickly as possible. Immediate feedback allows users to identify and fix common errors without having to submit the form to see the errors. Server-side validation messages provide a backup communication tool. There are a ...


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Simply, yes. Why wouldn't you provide the user with as much information to rectify the problem, that they need?


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None of the answers used "dim" information. My suggestion: Low battery - slowly dim in and out. Represents "sluggish performance" due to weak battery. Re-plug - short blinks in rapid succession (4-6). Represents "something's wrong" signal. Suport call - combine long/short/space blinks (like Darryl suggests) but only after some special button press (when ...


0

You have basically three types of errors : No battery Not connected Need assistance The most common are the 2 firsts, the third part is well covered in other answers so I will let you refer to them. You have 3 LEDs, let say they are green, orange and red. A signal with the three appearing in loop (green->orange->red...) can be a low battery signal. It ...


2

Very restrictive scenario, but if you're going to persist with such an interface the manual will need to clearly show the relating codes. I would suggest two groups of flashes as such, with a maximum of 5 flashes per group, you can [almost] easily display 20+ errors. I don't think I've made too many errors here, but you could tap out the codes to ensure ...


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Well personally, I think usability-wise, LEDs are among the worst to inform your users of a particular error. Modes Now to deal with that problem in the best possible manner. You have 3 clearly distinct modes (actually 4, 'off') to distinguish errors: Fast flash Slow flash Solid There are some in between (i.e. a slower phasing, alternating light) but ...


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Many computers use beep codes when they start up, as at that point, all that is available is the system board -- there may not even be a display unit. A similar system could be used with blinking the LED in groups of flashes; use one flash per second for the most common (low battery), then a group of two flashes with a distinct gap between groups, and so ...


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Apple must provide a visual clue if it cannot send a text message. Why not leverage that? Just googled (as I don't use an iPhone) and Apple uses an exclamation point. See: https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT204065


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Android offers you the opportunity to use a Toast, iOS doesn't have such a feature. Apple actually tells you to serve people an AlertView whenever you want to show an error occurred.



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