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First you design the system as if there will be no training. You have to consciously try to imagine that training will not be an option and make the system as usable as possible. This is no trivial thing, as some aspects may need training, no matter how good the UX is. Once you have done that, you then design the training. This way you should be able to ...


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I guess I am really lucky to have the services of an excellent technical writer to handle all the documentation for the manuals. The process she follows is as follows: Provide a high level screenshot Provide annotations on the screenshot using numbers or callouts Provide a table which specifies what annotation or call out does. The thing to note here is ...


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I think the goal of a training is to engage the trainee. This could be done through interactivity, but please avoid making interactivity the goal. Often we talk about such effects in UX and psychology, but a perfectly designed interaction pattern can never compensate for bad quality content. Some talks (pure video, for example, TED talks / Coursera) can be ...


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In Technical Communication, Volume 51, Number 2, May 2004, Gellivej and van der Meij present evidence for the effectiveness of screen captures in four scenarios, and I summarize their findings as follows: Switching attention - no significant effect Developing a mental model of the program - strong effect on accuracy Identifying and locating window elements ...


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One option is "on the job training" download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups This of course can be overused but sprinkled in it can be effective. A few important pieces to this include: Being able to dismiss if I don't care, a link to learn more and, most importantly, a way to keep track that the user has seen the message ...



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