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3

This is a content strategy questions and the answer would depend on the tone of your overall site. Some sites have spent a lot of time developing a "personality". So within that concept, if your site overall is a straight transnational (in, out, done) site it would be good to end with a message that fits that content model. Such as your typical, "Your order ...


3

It really depends on your site, who your customers are, and what they expect. One can conceive of a website as a medium in which "You, the store owner" are talking to "Me, the buyer." In that scenario a more personal scenario may work very well. In other cases (say Amazon) in which one knows there isn't a "person" on the other end it may not work as well. ...


7

tl;dr 3 positive options, 1 neutral and 1 negative, and that makes 5 in total to strike a balance. The choice of labels and emoji/smiley should target the least negative emotion and the least positive emotion; because you have to cross the minimum threshold to be in the extreme/maximum. If you are fishing for data then this is the best option. Also emotions ...


3

I'd add annoyed and bored. Happiness sounds like a consequence of being excited or amused and indifferent could just be no vote but if you want to keep it neutral you can use something like: Excited - Amused - Indifferent - Bored - Annoyed


3

Bias toward positive emotions 3 of the 5 are positive emotions: Happy, Excited, Amused 1 of 5 is nuetral emotions: Indifferent 1 of 5 is negative emotions: Angry You're setting up your ratings for a positive bias from the get go. Terminology Not everyone that doesn't like the content of an article is angry. What if the content is just poorly written, ...


0

You are asking for an exhaustive classification of typefaces into a taxonomy based on all sorts of variables. Alas, it doesn't exist--mainly because it's not really possible. Typefaces just don't fit into simple classifications easily. There's just too much subjectivity and, ultimately, context that will play a part in most of these factors. I think the ...


2

I think Fontbook should suit your requirements. It covers nearly 37,000 typefaces and every typeface has details about era, foundry, usage, designer, library, release date, number of sub families, font weights, glyphs per font, and trademark. It's a really well organized app. More about the app here.


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I have some paper font catalogs which could be used as such (eg. Creative Type ) , but also you can find such online, eg. http://www.100besttypefaces.com Also, both MyFonts.com and Fonts.com, but even FontShop tries to provide such information next to their typefaces.



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