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There is no good support for HTML forms in email clients, please check out this post http://www.flitehaus.com/blog/2011-06-20-can-i-include-form-email about the support for HTML forms.What you can do is send a link in the mail, which opens in the browser and contains the form.A quiz should be interactive, providing a Quiz in email client would not be ...


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To be honest, I would go back to the client and tell them that a form within an email is not the right approach. If you explain why, and suggest a better approach they will often take your advice. Can the quiz can be in the browser and the email will drive people to the this? If you absolutely had to do something in an email, you would need to rethink how ...


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If you want to go with a low-friction login system like this, why not implement login with a third party service like Mozilla Persona which requires only that the user input their email?


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Irrespective of the securtiy requirements of the system I personally feel that instead of falling into the cycle of entering the username > awaiting email > clicking on url to access the website a simple username password would suffice. In today's era somehow the end users want simple and quick responsive systems. So making them wait for an email to get the ...


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What is the purpose of the authentication? Are you collecting e-mail addresses for a marketing campaign? I see another flow with your potential alternative User enters email and hits submit I read this as User enters fake email foo@bar.org and hits submit User sees content So the user can effectively view the content without registering


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A book I really found helpful for this topic is Seductive Interaction Design. It deals with the many ways we can keep the user invested in our content while we get the information from them that we need. Studies show that people who have made a very small commitment are psychologically more likely to agree to a bigger (and more inconvenient) similar ...


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The best solution would be to handle those emails automatic, forwarding them to the appropriate recipient. For emails that cant be auto forwarded, you can simply write an automatic email back saying something like: "Sorry, you can't reply to our automatic emails, please login and do your action online (examle.com/do/action). If you have any questions ...


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Unfortunately there is only one way to fix this issue and it's not a good one. People will always do this even if you include the warning in 48px blinking red type so you have to set the reply-to email as the one that should be getting replied to. Either that or live with people that can't be bothered to read the instructions. You may consider putting the ...


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I think the problem that you are describing is not a problem with do-not-reply emails but with the lack of support for email interaction with your system. Many systems (like bug reporting Sifter, Trello, Basecamp and others) let people respond to issues sent to them by email (a response needs to be included above a certain point in the email) and after a ...


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Fortunately or unfortunately, spammers are good at convincing people to click links in emails. How do they do it? Personalize it - Include the name of the sender (assuming the recipient knows the sender.) Use the recipient's name. This proves it is not a generic email. Spoof your sending address - Make it appear the email came directly from the sender ...


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Don't rely on colour only First, I would urge you not rely on colour for semantics, this is to consider the colour blind (8% of male population). You can have the icons coloured, but you should provide different symbols for each state. Icons are nearly always unclear and ambiguous Second, nearly all icons are ambiguous and unclear, particularly for new ...


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Here's an idea. Include a retargeting tag on the unsubscribe page and target them through conventional advertising. You cannot send them another email -- due to the law and ethics. But, you can deliver advertisements targeted to those who have unsubscribed, and encourage them to re-subscribe for the latest show updates. Whether it is cost-effective or not ...


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No there are very little standards for newsletters. If you want a banner looking ad on your newsletter (or just a banner) simply resize your image to the proper width -> 600px for example. And keep your ratio. Newsletter are usually 600px wide (in order to appear correctly under most circumstances). If you can't put a standard width advert banner in your ...


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I guess you're implementing HTML-e-mail over plain text - an I would really consider using relative sizes email reading is done a lot in smartphones these days where your suggested sizes would be wider than some phones max screen width. Relative is the cure for not using too wide images.


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This one is quite easy, you simply can't. If you would use an address on an emailing list where the recipient has opt-out you violate the 6'th requirement of the CAN-SPAM Act. Doing so is violating the law and will enable the recipient to sue your company: Each separate email in violation of the law is subject to penalties of up to $16,000, and more ...


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I don't think it would be a good idea to send them an email again if they unsubscribed to the newsletter. The user could lose confidence in your service. If he decided to unsubscribe it means he had good reasons to do so. Maybe the emails was too frequent, the content wasn't suitable, etc. Plus the legal parameter to take into account. Sadly I think you'll ...



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