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1

A very nice answer to a similar question is answered by @Emerson Rocha Luiz Why is it common practice to send newsletters from fake email addresses? Copying and pasting the content as per policy. 5 reasons of why use fake emails Most emails from mail marketing are from some automatic tool or 3rd provider. These tools sometimes do not have easy way to ...


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Icons are fine. What counts is arriving at the most intuitive (user friendly) solution to the problem. There are times that an icon works wonderfully well. There are other times that users are slowed down, confused by an excessive use of icons - especially icons that must be learned. UX/IA geeks call adding an excessive amount of icons - especially ...


0

Somthing no other answer has mentioned. Out of office emails When sending huge amounts of emails (more so for marketing emails than receipt type emails) there are a lot of messages coming back these can be tricky to filter as there is no standard email reply and word based filtering gets you some false positives


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Scams (aka Phishing) This trains users not to trust a reply-to address as a vehicle for contacting the company. If you want to contact the company, visit their site manually or look up their phone number. Teach users that it's weird for official e-mails to contain contact information. Once they get used to this, they are at far lesser risk of getting ...


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As someone working in customer support, which of the following would make it easier for you to decide which mails you answer, which you forward to the technical staff, and which ones you ignore? If you got these e-mails to your contact address: Please implement feature X, we really need it! I bought product Y from you but it doesn't work Wow i liked the ...


2

Actually, there is one, but it's not what you think. Generally speaking, a no-reply e-mail is an anti-pattern. In my career, I've seen one example where two companies didn't use no-reply e-mails, and things went south. It's not a good reason to use no-reply e-mails, but certainly something you should consider when using support tools instead. Consider ...


1

If it would be possible to usefully handle most of the kinds of replies people would likely sent in response to automated notifications, such capability will often provide a better user experience than any form of no-reply email. If, however, usefully handling such replies would not be practical, having an automated notification explicitly disallow direct ...


2

One potential reason that I didn't see in the other answers is that the original email may contain sensitive information (perhaps an account number or something). Making it so that the reply goes nowhere could prevent this information from being inadvertently left in as part of an email chain.


-4

The sole purpose of sending No-Reply emails is to convey important messages, information, balance sheet of a company to share holders... It is only to convey, it is one sided and does not need any answer from the receiver and there is no need for the receiver to reply for that email. If at all any doubts arise, there are other ways of communication to the ...


2

From my experience developing e-commerce sites I know a little bit about how this happens. Rather than looking at how 'Amazon do it' in some ideal scenario we need to look at how it has happened with real small/medium sized businesses in the last few years. Imagine a bricks and mortar business with some office server running some 'Exchange' thing so that ...


1

The no-reply can be beneficial to the user. The system used by a company might be sending these emails from a bot inbox which won't reply. Not having the no-reply, might allow the user to think that he can just reply to the email where he/she will not get a reply.


24

Personally, I find this really annoying and really bad UX. There is a large music equipment online store in Europe, which does it differently, and I always enjoy interacting with them. When you reply to an invoice, you do not get just customer-care@whatever.example or billing@whatever.example, no, you actually get a direct email to the customer support ...


1

From a UX perspective - the perspective where the recipient of the 'no-reply' email is the centre of the universe: No, there is no good reason as people are used to replying to emails (some will try anyway) and clearly this would be the easiest way to raise any concerns they have at the point they have just finished reading the email. Intentionally making ...


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Is there any UX reason to send invoice like e-mails from no-reply addresses? Clarification to the customer comes to mind. The customer recognizes it's generated by a computer and not by some division of the company. Although this computer may or may not be part of the 'Customer Care' division, this is of no relevance to the customer.


71

It might not have many UX reasons... ... but it is benefical for the company. I start with companies that have a large community, for example amazon. They have 244 million users and therefore many e-mails to send and to reply to. Most of the sent e-mails probably are automatically generated shipping confirmations telling you not to reply, because this ...


7

Think of it this way, That order you just received in the mail you didn't like one little part of it, so you emailed back with some small 'issue'. Imagine how many other people are doing the same. Now imagine the effort it would take to complain about that small part if instead you had to go through a series of pages, support tickets or something along ...


3

Well, it's an anti-pattern actually as it totally disrupts the flow of any human being. I think it's something that is overused and IMHO can totally be ommited. One of the reasons I've heard was because some people (like marketeers) hate to sift through dozens of out-of-office mails. Another reason is probably because some companies apply a very rigorous set ...


1

Unfortunately not. There are varieties of the ”message sent successfully”, but no standard or convention available. In these cases, where there are no real convention, one can look at the web applications that users are familiar with. GMail.com by Google uses an information box where you have a link to the recently sent message. Outlook.com by Microsoft ...


0

You are asking for an exhaustive classification of typefaces into a taxonomy based on all sorts of variables. Alas, it doesn't exist--mainly because it's not really possible. Typefaces just don't fit into simple classifications easily. There's just too much subjectivity and, ultimately, context that will play a part in most of these factors. I think the ...


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I think Fontbook should suit your requirements. It covers nearly 37,000 typefaces and every typeface has details about era, foundry, usage, designer, library, release date, number of sub families, font weights, glyphs per font, and trademark. It's a really well organized app. More about the app here.


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I have some paper font catalogs which could be used as such (eg. Creative Type ) , but also you can find such online, eg. http://www.100besttypefaces.com Also, both MyFonts.com and Fonts.com, but even FontShop tries to provide such information next to their typefaces.



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