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I found some tips over here so I shared it with you below. http://uxmovement.com/mobile/10-tips-to-get-you-started-with-responsive-design/ https://www.campaignmonitor.com/dev-resources/guides/mobile/ Though I am not expert. Hope this will help you.


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I believe this has to do with how Outlook presents the messages in the Inbox. By default, when I open the application, the first email in my Inbox (whether I've read it or not) is visible in the reading pane. If, however, I'm actually opening Outlook to click over to my calendar, I may have completely missed that email that first opened. That first email is ...


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I always have believed this is bad UX when considering the totality of email applications, and questionable UX when considering Outlook in a vacuum. When compared to other email apps, virtually every other application out there marks an item as read as soon as it's opened and decrements the total unread mail count. In Outlook, both the message status and ...


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I like this question! People who build software/hardware in the past - before app stores - used to have to sell it in the shops or on a website. People looked for features, ticking boxes - the more it had the better it was. This often meant that some of the features were of poor quality - due to developers just wanting to create the bear minimum of features ...


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Quite a bit of back and forth happens when manually trying to set up meetups using email this is why I believe calendar features are common in email. Consider the following conversation over email. Harry can I meet you on friday to talk over the thesis? Rachel No I wont be in on friday. can we make it thursday? Harry No I cant make it on thursday. how ...


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Because when you create an appointment, it will send a special mail that ask the others if they come or not. All those who accept will have the meeting added in their calendar. The email here is used to as a communication channel for the calendar part. The integration make sure that when you put someone on an appointement he will receive an email, ...


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Use your scheme with invitations and links but do put the new users in a walled-garden like environment. They are associated to their corresponding admin, they may sign in and use basic functions (like sending the admin a message or related functions) but the admin has to verify the logged in user, this will be a one-more-click process for the admin, but a ...


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Regarding research, yes, there is research. But if you want to see the full research results, generally you have to pay for that. Just one example, "Econsultancy" provides free articles about what they consider contact details best practices, but if you want the full research results, that is available for sale. Boiled down to its simplest, the best ...


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Rather than debating, I would automatically go with the online form thing. And the reasons are obvious, the convenience for the user. When filling an online form, you do not need to open your email and login, then compose the email and make sure that they have put the correct email address in the field. With contact form, all you need to do is input your ...



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