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In your first email to the clients, make sure you mention with emphasis that the emails are available in other languages, probably mentioning available languages also. Provide a link where they are able view this first email in their native language. When they are led to read the email content after selecting their language, gently ask them if they would ...


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This is more of a technical blindspot. The nearset solution would be (assuming you support somwhere between 2 to 5 languages) you can send newletter in all languages in a single mail. If it is just 2 language then you can suppliment second language text inline. Also you may use CC-TLD domain to assume language (risky approach with country having many native ...


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Why not a link to the settings page where they can change their "default" language. The settings page could also have links to the translated versions of the email(s) for ease of access ... or allow for re-sending the last email in the newly selected language upon change of default language. Allowing (MAKING?) the user pick their preferred language will be ...


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My single biggest recommendation would be to think less about the emails themselves, and more about what you want them to get people doing. For example, if it's impossible to get value out of your application without taking three initial steps (say, creating a project, uploading your logo, and sharing it with a client), then I would look to time the emails ...


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Generally, I'd go with the 'make sure they're still alive' principle: Register Send them an email when they register. That can be a confirmation email or just a welcome email. Interact Send them more when they interact with the site, as Benny mentions. But not too many - lots of emails are annoying. If you really have to send lots, provide an option to ...


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I don't provide any evidence or proof of best practice, but I've noticed a good thing in TripAdvisor. I signed up over a year ago, didn't think much about it and got one or two e-mail. Since I didn't care, the e-mail stopped coming. However, I started posting stuff to TripAdvisor after our latest combined trip of Iceland and New York (just for the record ...


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Actually, it gets even weirder. You will want to use tables for formatting and put your styles just after <body> instead of in <head>. There are lots of gotchas, like no background images. Psst: it's pretty much all because of Outlook. Surprised? Your best bet is to use a test service like https://litmus.com/ or even a physical device lab to ...


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UX Movement recently put out a good article discussing a closely related topic. They concluded that requiring fields actually causes users to fill out less information. With that in mind, I would suggest that requiring data only makes sense when you absolutely must have it in order to proceed. Pretending to require data is probably even worse, as you seem to ...


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First, what is the use of "data collection" if the data is not used otherwise than harass the users? Not cool. Anyway, explain why you ask for such data as my email - if you don't have a real answer, don't ask. "Best practice" depends actually on the very use of the data. For example Hubspot requires a fairly complex data form for its free download of ...


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It sure isn't best practice and impedes users' trust for at least two reasons : what about a site that asks for personal information without saying what they are going to do with it ? What is the value for me ? Can I trust they will use it in my interest only ? what about a site that I can trick that easily ? Has the all thing been that poorly thought and ...



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