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218

No, it's not a good idea. You want to make purchasing from your website as easy as possible. Forcing a user to give out an email address before they're even able to see what you're selling is not a good approach. This will most probably push a big part of your customers away from the site rather than forming a commitment to it. You should read the $300 ...


91

Call it the email address. It's unambiguous. A user returning to your service will always remember their email. They may not remember if they configured a special username, however.


83

Usability aside, there are also some technical points against your strategy: Basically, you are sending spam to your users. The content of your site is hidden behind a login page - that makes it unsearchable. In many sites, the absolute majority of traffic comes from search results and price comparison sites (like Google Shopping). Similarly, the content ...


75

Quirky employs a variation of Option #1. Instead of asking to unsubscribe, they tell you that they've unsubscribed you, giving you an option (and incentive) to re-subscribe. I was pretty impressed with this strategy. I didn't resubscribe, but I appreciated them taking me off their list based on my viewing habits.


63

There are already good answers on optimizing the existing success page. I want to add an alternative. Demo mode Skip the success page and log the user in immediately. There are a lot of examples of web applications, which allow access before verifying your email address. The user may browse the content, configure his profile, ... but public content ...


50

Emails were never intended as a form of chat type messaging. Remember that they are electronic versions of mail, so trying to modify them to be something they weren't designed for is a mistake. As to the reasons why we write the subject line first: The subject line is part of the header of an email (see the original RFC822 and the newer RFC5322), and ...


47

This one is quite easy, you simply can't. If you would use an address on an emailing list where the recipient has opt-out you violate the 6'th requirement of the CAN-SPAM Act. Doing so is violating the law and will enable the recipient to sue your company: Each separate email in violation of the law is subject to penalties of up to $16,000, and more ...


45

One way may be to allow a file-first Email creation process. If you often send files + some text, rather than text + rarely files, you may want to allow users to start a new Email in different ways: Drag + drop a file into the application window opens a new Email to which it is attached, waiting for just a description and To: address. Provide (Send Email) ...


43

Instructions on how to activate your account have beem emailed to you. Please check your email. The word "instructions" may be scary to some people. It makes activation sound more complicated than it is. I'd suggest changing the message to this: Almost done... We've sent an email to joe.doe@gmail.com. Open it up to activate your ...


43

For readers: You need to know what the stuff is all about. For writer: You need to know what the stuff you are going to write about.


40

I also think that keyword analysis will help but can fail in some cases. The following is meant as a backup and is based on the assumption that quite a number of users seem to notice immediately after sending the email that they forgot to attach something (based on email I receive). Probably a small change could make a difference? - user composes email and ...


37

(See the comments for a lively debate about this idea!) I disagree with the other answers here. (There are 5 at the moment.) Like all good design answers: it depends. In 99% of cases, you'll want to put off on gathering information for as long as possible. But there are a few very good reasons you would want to collect information first. It all depends on ...


35

No. Forcing the user to enter an email address before they can view your products will more than likely drive them away, for the following reasons: Increased barrier to entry to your site - resulting in a dramatic reduction of "eyes on the prize". It's suspicious. The user will wonder why you're asking for their email address to just see your website. ...


34

Relax. I get many emails a day from services that I am interested in, but the timing just isn't right (Meetup, Groupon, mailing lists). If I don't want them, I know how to unsubscribe, but usually seeing the first line or two without opening them is all I need. I'd be annoyed if you chastised me for not opening them. Maybe a more useful strategy is--if ...


32

The options to choose Option 4: continue to send the emails If people don't want your emails they will tell you or Option 5: imply everyones getting the email This is a little dishonest but... well, no judgments. Just send them an email; seemingly out of the blue asking if they want to continue with your emails. Something along the lines of "We ...


31

It's better to use a special one-time login url. Reasoning: You want to make the process as easy as possible to have the lowest drop-off rate. Sending someone a temporary password requires them to either retype a password that they haven't chosen, or copy and paste it. It also provides no additional security benefits.


30

The nicest one that I've seen so far was hello@myname.com. It came across as friendly and human.


29

Remember that irrespective of the domain, it's the bit before the @ that is the reference by which you addressing the person, so you can detach the username from the domain name. js@johnsmith.com keeps things nice and simple, but rather anonymous - who is js exactly john@johnsmith.com has redundancy, yes, but keeps it on a personal level which is nice and ...


21

i'd opt for an instant login (and also a verification email), but with limited privileges until the user confirms the email address.


21

mailto: links are still the standard way to display e-mail addresses, largely because it's the only way to link to e-mail addresses. Webmail clients generally require a toolbar or plugin to become the default application handler for mailto: links, but it's still better to have the link than to not have it: for people who don't have their webmail service set ...


21

Number 1 is one of my pet peeves... especially because I tend to immediately confirm my email, so the flow for me is fill out form > check email/click confirm > return to site as authenticated user. If, after doing that, I have to log in again, it drives me up the wall! At the very least, allow your users who are confirming their email address in the same ...


21

It depends on the app. You need to establish whether messaging is an integral part of the workflow for your users. Social platforms and collaboration apps often include an internal messaging mechanism. Other types of apps - not so much. But don't get hung up on the term "email" itself, because it will restrict your thinking to the conventional email - with ...


20

It's an anti-pattern that has unfortunately resulted from a legitimate problem: people type in the wrong email address and then after sign up, can't access their account. The problem here is that this solution isn't very user friendly because it's going against conventional interaction (namely, that you can copy and paste from and to form fields). There's ...


18

Do not insert hyphens, not even soft hyphens &shy; (which only appear if the browser forces a line break). This is because the user might hand-write it or read-dictate it to someone else with the hyphen. Which would be inaccurate and bad. You could however use the <wbr> element to indicate an optional word break opportunity. This will tell the ...


16

GMail does this already with similar wording as above. I have written attached in the email, but have not attached the file. This has been a feature for about 3 years I think.


15

On a security vs usability note -- the reason why some systems don't say whether it was the email or password that was entered is because by saying 'invalid email' you're conversely giving a hacker a signal that a given email does work when it is present. So I'd not say 'invalid email' -- I'd say 'email or password was not recognised'.


15

Michael - I spent a couple of years working for one of the larger email marketing firms, and from their excellent design (and deliverability) teams I learnt a couple of things about this issue: --attachments are a turnoff. We are telling users more and more to be wary of attachments as they can be harmful. Even when received from known sources, users are ...


15

The second time you are asked to enter your email you may notice it says "confirmation." That's all it is really, just confirmation that you are entering the correct email. In some instances, asking for an email twice is crucial. Consider signing up for an email list for example. If the user makes a mistake and enters their email incorrectly, they may leave ...


15

First, I'd suggest reading my answer from a few years ago which explains the importance of the wording. Secondly, if you can eliminate the delay that'd be ideal. Even with changing the instructions, you're still going to get some complaints with a 5 minute delay. But assuming the delay is here to stay, here's how I'd write it... Almost done... ...


14

Arguments against forms: Users have to fill in more information (at least their email address) There is more room for errors. What if the user mistypes the email address? No way of contacting him/her. Losing your internet connection, pressing a wrong button etc. can cause the loss of the message (very frustrating) The mail isn't in your sent mail folder. ...



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