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156

One reason why this might not be a good idea is that you would have to enforce unique passwords. This does not seem like a big issue to user experience at first, but from a security point of view, this is critical, here is why: Enforcing unique passwords means that when a user picks a password there is a chance they accidentally (or with malicious intent) ...


125

Closing the door for the floor the elevator is on reduces the time, the elevator can serve another floor upon request. The time is saved due to omitting the door closing step. Considering that elevators usually serve more than two floors this speeds up the more frequent use case.


125

A google search doesn't really provide me any answers but I do have some ideas on why the doors would close. 1: Time Efficiency (As stated by Andrew, Ruudt, and Angelo) Closing the door reduces the time the elevator needs, to move to a different floor when someone presses the button. 2: Safety 1 When a door stays open and a user approaches the elevator ...


41

If you choose to have a password only log in, you will run into many problems. Security If you only require a password, you have no way of knowing who it is that you are logging in unless you enforce unique passwords. In that case, if I were to sign up and tried to use a common password (say "Password") and your system told me that it was not allowed, ...


28

I respectfully disagree with Michael's answer. I can't speak to desktop GUIs, but in web forms you want to avoid having a default unless you believe a large portion of your user's (maybe 90%+) will select that value. Particularly if it's a required field. Why? Because you're likely to introduce errors because people breeze through forms quickly online - ...


22

Which is more important depends on what you are designing. My general guidelines would be: Intuitive matters mast when you're designing an app that people aren't going to invest time into learning. It's important that they get a win as soon as possible, and that means that they need to be able to use the product with little or no time learning it. Think of ...


22

A reason that just providing passwords could be problematic is in system administration. By providing only passwords you are making it difficult for the administrator to get a handle on the account. Thus while each account may have an account number, the admin won't be able to easily relate that to a user. e.g. User: "I have a problem with my account" ...


22

There are several answers about reducing time for people calling the elevator from other floors, however while desirable, I believe that is a secondary benefit. Safety trumps convenience. Typically, automatic door closure is related to an emergency situation. An example might be that a fire (possibly as yet undetected) has occurred on a floor , or hot or ...


20

It's simple math. Let's say a building has 10 floors. Leaving the doors open on the floor the elevator is on benefits 1 floor out of 10 as it reduces the time to enter the elevator. But it lengthens the time to enter the elevator on 9 out of 10 floors as those floors now need to wait for the elevator doors to close before it can start moving. As such, ...


16

From a user's perspective, the open door would also seem to be an invitation to get into the elevator. During the elapsed time of getting into the elevator, it could be called from another floor, causing the doors to close and at which point the boarding passenger thinks Wow! What a convenient and smart elevator!. But, instead of going down to the lobby, ...


15

Hard Limits In the 10ms-5ms range you're running into the refresh rates and response times of pixels on your monitor. Many monitors are limited to 60Hz (17ms refresh). You're also getting close to limits of visual perception. We take around 100ms to direct our eyes to something new that has appeared on screen. Noise The difference between a compile ...


13

Interesting idea, let's analyze its parts. EDIT: I'll state outright that I'm not really a fan of the idea for the reasons kontour stated (enforcing unique passwords exposes existing passwords to new registrants). n-factor authentication As others have alluded to, the trend in security has been to increase the factors required for authentication. It's ...


12

Elevators actually do have an option to stay on a floor and leave the doors open - that's what they do in service mode. But it also makes it ignore the call buttons outside the elevator. It is a huge time saver for people moving in/out of an apartment building - the elevator will always stay with it's doors open on the current floor, and only close them ...


11

You need to reduce or remove the confusion of the multiple inheritance and that is classically a very hard thing for users to understand when being displayed as a tree because a tree has a single direction of information - from the root node downwards (trunk to leaf) So perhaps you could instead use something along the lines of a Miller Columns as in the ...


11

Any problem like this involves a matrix of priorities that you need to decide on before you can have a solution. For example, do you care more about people waiting on the ground floor than any of the other floors? Do you care about energy consumption? Is there a particular floor that is more important than others? Once you've decided on these, you can ...


11

They say that "too many cooks spoil the soup" and while there's some truth to that, I think the proper saying is actually "too many opinionated people that think they are cooks spoil the soup" is more appropriate. So, yes, having too many uninformed opinions can be a bad thing (design by committee) but having multiple informed opinions isn't necessarily bad, ...


8

While not talking about response times as low as the question, there are some very interesting results from tests carried out by Google and Bing here: http://radar.oreilly.com/2009/06/bing-and-google-agree-slow-pag.html The bottom line is that users interact more with responsive web pages and the companies made more profit. I would think it's not too ...


8

While it is generally agreed as a rule of thumb that fewer clicks are better, a more important metric is considering how much the user has to think to complete the action. Ten thoughtless clicks are a great leap better than having to perform one confusing click. As long as the process is simple and requires very little thought, the number of clicks requires ...


8

I'd like to first of all debunk the theories of lazy programmers and global shortcuts. Lazy programmers (but not the lazy smart programmers) would not single out keyboard shortcuts as a particular requirement they're too lazy to do. There's nothing hard about setting it up. Most programming languages and frameworks provide functions and convenience ...


8

Icons can improve readability and findability in sense that users, that a familiar with interface, usually don’t read the labels in common way, but search for visual markers, that help identify item. It happens due to visual form, that we percieve before “read” — for instance, in peripheral vision we don’t read, only percieve the form and colour of item, so ...


8

If you are looking for the fastest way for experts to enter the data, you should focus on keyboard entry with keyboard navigation. I would rename Alpha and Beta to "Alpha (1-5)" and "Beta (1-5)", and make them text entry areas restricted to the numbers 1-5. You should have some sort of client side validation to ensure that no other numbers are used. I ...


8

If an elevator is sitting idle on some floor with the doors open, then the time required to respond to a service request on that floor will be reduced, but the time required to respond to a service request elsewhere will be increased. In a building with multiple elevators, it may sometimes be possible to have one elevator sitting open at the main floor ...


7

People use the elevator to move between ground (0) floor and one of the higher floors. There are two directions, upward and downward. In situation when all the people have to use elevator, upward and downward category stats would distribute normally, so about 50% of calls should be from the floor level. People are more up to use stairs in the following ...


7

Or you can use tab button if it's only a few options. Spinner much preferred if it's numeric and more than 4 options.


7

It could have a massive effect on sales. Users can't buy what they can't find. And some users prefer searching, others browsing, and others faceted search like the one you offer. You clearly ignore the former two types and only account for the latter. By not offering browsing, you are also miss on discovery - it is often a business goal to show what they ...


6

Looks like JohnGB beat me to it. As he says, efficiency wins out when: the user will be spending a lot of time with the application the application will become important to the user, and they have an investment in understanding its nuances the application exists in a time-critical domain A good example might be a stock tracking application for a city ...


6

A blank value really isn't a good idea - it doesn't really provide a visual clue, and may even imply to some users that the field is not required. Saying something like "Select an Animal" along with the same type of visual cue that you use for other required fields (the most common being the red asterisk) should help convey the point.


6

More often that not, what you have to store is determined by your payment processor and so you usually have very little say in the matter. When you do, the general rule for security is to only store what you absolutely have to. The less information you store, the lower your security risk, and the less information customers have to enter (in general) the ...


6

This was suggested in 2000 by Jef Raskin, and it was implemented by Amazon for at least a couple of years. It's a good idea, and no less secure. The reason it's not less secure than a username and password is because your username is probably guessable. It's your email address, or your first name, or your first initial plus your last name, or it's the ...


6

As with many other things, the answer probably lies in the possible failure modes. Let us consider what can go wrong in various bad cases, when the doors are open, and when they are closed. 1) A loss of suspension. A cable snaps. Doors open: you now have a gaping pit. Doors closed: you now have closed doors that will not open again until the cage rises ...



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