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2

I submit that you can't go too far with humanization. Just look at the Ling's Cars website and how it goes crazy overboard with it...but it not only works, it has worked well. Take a look at their employees page. http://www.lingscars.com/meet-staff.php#models It's hard to be so masterfully tacky, tasteless, and make millions. But, the world's worst ...


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Store credit. Wallets are things you use in several stores. So for example if I get money from amazon to put in my wallet, I can go and spend it on ebay.com. But what you're describing is limited to just the website you're currently on, more like a coupon or gift certificate. In other words, not 'portable'.


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I'd go with 'Account credit'. Here in the UK, 'store' is more something you do rather than somewhere you go - you go to the shop. Appreciate that cultural boundaries are blurring, but I think that particularly for international use, everyone has an 'account' with you, but not everyone will immediately get the 'store credit' reference. On a related note: ...


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I agree there is no rule here, but in my opinion, Wallet credit is a far more vague and ambiguous concept than store credit. You should aim to have descriptive labels that match real life context. In this particular situation I would advice to go with store credit as its more descriptive and more aligned with e-commerce particularly if users could also ...


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Edit: I think I misunderstood the question a bit. You're referring to credits and not the storage medium. In this case, Store credit makes more sense. To draw a parallel, you put "currency" in your physical wallet and not "wallet currency". Hence for an e-commerce setup, Store credit or credit would be the more appropriate term. Example - "You've received ...


5

When it begins to feel disingenuous, which is nearly always. In fact, most attempts at 'humanization' result in absurdities that people are so numb to by now they just ignore it. It's just noise at this point. Why generate more noise? Do something more productive. "Hello! Welcome to our site! What would you like to do today?" This is, for some reason, ...


61

I would say it's too humanized if it hinders the users in finding the information they visited the site for in the first place. I once visited the website of the local supermarket to find out their opening hours on a holiday. I entered every menu option i could see, but couldn't find the opening times. Instead, I found a lot of pictures of smiling ...


4

Humanizing is OK as a design tool if used sparingly, though I think people are smart / cynical enough not to be fooled by it. What ever you do DO NOT ANIMATE. Sounds are even worse. This is extremely distracting to the user. The user has come to your website to perform a task and you are effectively trying to hijack their attention. All those who remember ...


99

Humanization is no different from any other design technique Like many other design approaches, humanizing an interface has advantages and disadvantages and as such, is correspondingly prone to overuse and misuse. I'm not a fan of humanizing as a goal. Websites are not humans, and trying to humanize a website is useful only if it actually improves user ...


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I would avoid an omious black on a big button that will inevitably take money out of your pocket based entirely on your desisions to that point. I also feel like the right window's scheme works a little better based on this thought and that yellow works well with big buttons; black and white, not so much.


17

An experience is overly personal when it shares irrelevant details that get in the way of the message. Humanizing is just explaining things in terms of people rather than systems, not telling someone’s life story for no reason.


2

This sounds like it only applies to websites that want to sell you something. I definitely wouldn't see this coming from websites that want you to use their free product. For example, I definitely wouldn't see it coming from a site that boasts a new Javascript framework, or a site that promotes community service, etc. It also relies heavily on whether or ...


3

Besides anything, take a look to the "Which Color Converts the Best?" article and then How To Design Call to Action Buttons That Convert. Just in case you don't want to read them, the absolute answer is "could be anything". In your specific case, yellow is quite possibly the best choice because of contrasting and disruption of the palette, but you'll need to ...


1

Since the only color added would be to the call to action I would certainly suggest using the yellow button. why? Color is very important when trying to create emphasis. I wrote a post on my blog that recommended you let your hyperlinks shine. Well, your call-to-action buttons should shine even brighter. After all, if you’re using them correctly, these ...


0

I am more familiar with option 2 design. The quantity in option 1 is quite overwhelming and the button 'done' seems bit out of place(it took few more seconds to figure out). If one opts for input field, bringing in 'update cart' button will be necessary. Which is missing from both options.


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I guess this is the taskflow As is -> Select design -> Add to Cart -> Payment gateway Custom -> Fill form -> Mail receipt -> Manual payment You need shopping cart only for the As is section. What you need for custom order is an order history page. But since your requirement is for customers to keep track of both in a same section, this is my suggestion ...


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Why not delay customization options until the shopping cart is finalized...e.g. you press the checkout option. You'd press checkout, pay for any as-is items in the cart... then get the options for the custom items. If you don't pay for the as-is items, you don't get the ability to order custom items..but it beats having a split order (I see you ordered an ...


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I would recommend a split layout. Distinguish the process using colors, icons and context. You don't have to add the custom design to cart. The custom design is a group/set of data that the designer would use to make the product. Therefore you can treat it like sending an email. You could include a product reference number in the bespoke design that's from a ...


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Sounds like you have two channels. 1) manual payment for custom, 2) paypal for as-is. The first option doesn't really need a cart. It's not like customers are going to be filling up their virtual cart with lots of custom products. Even if they do want to order more than one thing, it sounds like this channel will be best served with a landing page that ...


2

You do not need to add customized product into cart since the payment will be done later manually. Cart approach is for payment at the end but you can use another metaphor which is highly accepted in service and customized product sector: inquiry You can create an inquiry section for customized orders with a suggestive price indication. Due to the ...


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You don't need two separate shopping carts. Your shopping cart is just a generic collection. It can contain any product(s) for that matter. In your case you can specify whether the product is "as is" or a "customizable" one (You can put a flag on the product to say whether this product is customizable. Based on this flag you can enable/disable a ...


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There's two ways you could go about this: If users must configure payments at this step, then your button could read Configure Payment or Choose Payment Option. Since changing subscriptions and setting up payments are multi-part steps, it may be best to break the process into two steps. Save and Continue then Save or Submit Payment on the next screen ...


2

It is ok to display a generic image of the product in the category page or as a primary picture. Even amazon does this. Only after the user goes into the details page will he/she get to know the available color choices and other options. As you already have a picture of the available product, it is ok to display it in the details page. This flow will work ...



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