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From what you've described of the user flow, "Make it yours" speaks to your user in the context she's in and clearly indicates the next step. Now, in your specific case the underlying question is: "Should I use a CTA with more casual/friendly language or direct language in this case?" and the truth is... we don't know for sure. The best way to find out ...


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Just by reading the "Make it yours" it already sounds more compelling than a generic contact us. A friendly and inviting language can be a great approach. The more transparent and human it is the better. From an user point of view I always find that when website use friendly and almost daring language, it tends to captivate me more than the most common ...


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Jakob Nielsen warns about using automatic popups (even though old javascript popups aren't technically the same thing as modal windows, they have the same basic function) - http://www.nngroup.com/articles/most-hated-advertising-techniques/. These surveys are based on ads and not regular site content, but I think that there's a big chans that the users will ...


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There seems to be a common misconception that different apps should have different UX. I contend that what is good for ECRM is also good for a supply chain application. Ask them if they would like different UX design in Work versus Excel. Find some standard guideline to support that UX design. I personally don't like modal. I found this in some Microsoft UX ...


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On a very general notice, enterprise applications tend to favor speed over good UX making it harder to learn but faster to operate once you’ve learned the application. This is a very different approach from a customer application where UX is (and should be) the top priority. Having it this way is kind of legacy from the first enterprise application run on ...


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A user should always have a sense of home when using any software, web or otherwise. If you rely on other sites for anything, you leave your user's experience in the hands of others. This is a great user testing case. I recommend setting up test scenario for a few people and see how they react. Ask for their honest feedback and then weigh the results. ...


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The important thing here is to keep the user informed; your users are complaining because they don't understand the process, and it is surprising them. Instead of relying on button labels to let them know what happens next, you could use a progress tracker design to show them the entire process, and their current place:


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With the currently widespread use of touchscreen devices like smartphones or tablets, a hover element is not really user-friendly, since touchscreens cannot really show hover elements. In this case, there is a good alternative: energy labels in Europe have a letter(+(+(+))) indication that is easy to display in a small box and is clear to the average user ...


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If technical reasons prevent you from having an optimal flow for the user, just add a simple line of text to your Sign Up page: 'You can choose delivery hours in the next step'.


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I think that keeping users on one site always leads to a more convenient, less confusing experience, I believe that whenever possible and logical, the user experience should be kept in one place. Think about a site like amazon, fandango or ticketmaster. You go to the site, you shop for what you want you buy it, and then you are done, you never left the site, ...



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