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1

Option 1 is more explicit at informing user the limit is editable and option 2 is not as explicit as option 1 but it's still clear enough for user to understand the limit field is editable. Option 2's UI is cleaner and looks better but the difference is minor. Both would work but if I have to pick one, I would pick option 2 for your particular scenario. ...


0

I second your initial thought. Use the arrows. As for your concern over "moving the carrot in the text field" you can use Javascript to actively shift the focus to the multi-column navigation once it senses the down key. The user can click back on the field in order to regain the use of the arrows on the field. Just my 2 cents. :)


1

At tradus.com We use the below We show the entire cart in first scroll. In second scroll we show the address / payment options. The header button changes according to the information filled. i.e If the address / payment information is filled , the button says "Payment>" which take user to payment. Else we show "Checkout" which actually scroll down to ...


0

The best checkout experience for me personally has been through the Poshmark iphone app. I use it often just to quickly check the total price including shipping and if I think it's too expensive, I can get back to my item easily using the back button. It takes just two clicks to make a purchase on this app if your details have been entered once. You could ...


3

Dan Ariely has some great research in his book Predictably Irrational about the "Power of Free". The most interesting example of the power of “free” in Predictably Irrational comes from Amazon.com. When they launched a “free shipping” promotion with the purchase of a second book every country except France showed a big jump in sales from the offer. ...


0

It gets harder when the cost of shipping does not go up if the customer buys more items. Often I buy plants on line, the shipping charge will be fixed or for upto 8 plants, as the vendor has to pay per box, and does not give a discount from the shipper for a smaller box. This make it very hard to compare prices on say eBay, without read the details of each ...


1

If you ever have different shipping prices the 'included' versions is much less clear. Several types of delivery, different amounts for different target locations, extra options. You'd either include the most expensive form which makes your prices inflated, of the least expensive form, which makes you some sort of sneaky deflater. They are separate products, ...


1

For me personally, it will put me off if the shipping is not including in the visible price. For two reasons, one, I don't want to the math to add the two together to see my final price, and two, I usually am more enticed to purchase something when it says free anything at the bottom. People like free stuff. If you stop to think for a moment, you'd realize ...


1

Its all about customer experience and fulfilling the delivery promise. For me Delivery is as important as the product. I will abandon a shopping cart if the delivery options are not satisfactory enough and purchase elsewhere. Our customers tell us they have gained double digit growth by removing the static delivery page within their website. Instead they ...


0

If the objective is to make sales, then the answer clearly is to remove any impediments or negative implications off the face of your offering. But this is more of a marketing directive than user experience. It's important you see the difference. In other words, leave the bad news for later. On the other hand leave the Free shipping icon as it is ...


0

Most shops price shipping and handling separately from the price of an item because it's cheaper for them to ship a given amount of product in a few large orders than in many small orders. This happens for a number of reasons including: The amount of time/effort to retrieve 2+ of an item from the warehouse is normally only marginally more than the cost of ...


2

Think of the user experience and perception: If you have a luxury product or service and want to give a feeling of white glove service then free shipping can be important part of that user experience. If you have impulse buy then the user may be more put off by add-on's than the sticker price If you say you are fighting for the lowest price - then show ...


1

One thing you might consider is taxes. In some areas shipping charges are not taxable if listed separately. Which means that your $60 item with free shipping might actually end up costing you more than if it was $50 with $10/shipping. Beyond that serious AB testing needs to occur. My limited experience says that there is almost no real difference between ...


7

Most e-Commerce sites have different shipping options. For example it may be "Free Delivery" for standard delivery, $5 for "Next Day Delivery" or $10 for "Saturday Delivery". If this was a T-Shirt company for example, and the cost of the "t-shirt" was $50, and the cost for the shipping (by an external company such as DHL) was $10 then it would be better to ...


1

From a SEO point of view I would use a separate product page for each color, and distinctly put it in the product descriptions. That way when people are searching for a red mixer, they will find your site. You also have more landing pages you can customize from a SEO standpoint. From a UX point of view it would definitely depend on the way you present it. ...


-1

The best way to find out is do some A/B testing on your site.


0

My opinion is the first one as long as I can clearly see next to the product that I will be paying $10 for shipping. The second one makes me wonder how much is the shipping costing the seller and therefore the quality of the carrier/postal service. As commented already this really would benefit from A/B testing


22

There are factors outside of how users behave on your site that might determine whether you use one or the other. For comparison sites or shopping searches it's important to get a high listing and a low headline price often helps - the first challenge is getting people to visit your site. High traffic with higher dropout is normally more profitable than ...


0

What you want is the best possible click-to-sale conversion rate. Why remove the chance for a customer to add something to their cart at the earliest possible point? Or in other words, why require the customer to drill down into the details to add the item to their cart? If I know what I want, I have no reason to dive into the details. NewEgg does it the ...


0

If you are doing grocery shopping, YES Its good to have Add to cart and Quick View both the buttons on product listing. Moreover I think it depends a lot on targeted market and behaviour of shopping. i.e As I mentioned If you are selling online groceries, It makes lot of sense to put the "Add to cart" button on listing page because probability of buying ...


1

As well as being dependent on your target market, you should also consider the type of products being displayed on the page. Would your customers want/need more information? eg a pack of 10 black clothes hangers with an image of the product does not warrant a click through to a detailed description and delivery options page, and then another click for the ...


0

In broad terms the flow should be centred about the users focus point - namely the ensemble the user will buy. If the right UI is achieved this display should be ever present. Few high-level approaches Have browse tools that will "drop" an item onto the 'mannequin' Build a matrix of looks (i.e. generate real-time masonry portfolio) based selected ...


0

thank you for your answers, I can't vote up yet but the answers were both great and I have made a few amendments to the site in general. Please do let me know if you like / or don't like what you see. Interestingly, changing Products to This month's recipes are pushing people into the products page. Then when users go into all recipes they don't stay on the ...


0

When I first saw your old page my eyes scanned the links "how it works" and "Products" before hitting the logo. That indicated the end of the navigation for me and I went down to the "Get started" section. Looking at the new site my eyes scanned "Products" and "Recipes" and I since that was what I expected on a cooking site, I felt the urge to click ...


0

I have a few more questions to get a better understanding of the user activity. In the previous design, of the users that clicked the 'Get Started' button, did a majority complete their purchase or navigate to other pages within the site? After going to the recipes page, are users proceeding to the 'Get Started' (order) page? What percentage of users view ...


1

I'm still a HUGE fan of pixels. The problem however is that we're in the age of responsive design now. Unfortunately, Ems are starting to make more sense to me, even if I HATE what happens when you accidentally nest Ems or lose track of the base font-size. You could very easily end up with a font that's even smaller than you have now. Whatever you do ...


1

If you are setting your body to 16px and body text to 11px, your resulting font size will be 68.8% of your body font size. Try using EM's instead and understand how PX, EM's & percentages work. Article on font units


4

One of the main reasons might be that a lot of companies use the Address Verification System to match the entered address against the cardholder's address (assuming a Credit/Debit Card payment takes place). In this case you'll need the billing address. So this is the address you need anyway - and in a lot of cases the billing address will match the shipping ...


3

The right choice might depend on your user base. If it mostly consists of private residential customers, it is likely that they will not need to make any difference between both addresses and that their main concern will be the shipping address. If it is mainly made of business customers, things can be different for at least two reasons : the billing ...


4

Depends on the business. Sometimes a customer already knows what they're looking for, or has previously shopped and made the decision, and being able to "grab and check out" is convenient. I don't think forcing another click (and then a return-to-list click) will cost you many consumer sales. Pros want as much streamlining as they can get.


4

I think its bit tricky question. Its totally depends on the your target market. If your target market is mature enough you can have add to cart button straight forward. but if not they have to dig into details. Using model box option may make this much easier. But i recommend to have both options.


1

Amazon uses "from" in this context: EDIT Note that this is not a starting price, but a group of similar products with different prices.



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