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I think the BACK/NEXT navigation within the quickview is only useful if the user is in a well defined category or filter where they are trying to compare similar items.


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Is there not enough real estate for a tab bar at the bottom of the page? It's a very standard thing to do at least on iOS. Another solution might be incorporating their account name/picture as a button (not substantiated by research, but user probably are more likely to tap their own name/picture to see where it brings them). A similar alternative may be ...


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I think what the wireframe has is a better option minus the 9 dots. 3 dots, from what I've been seeing, is becoming the (dare i say universal) 'more' icon. With your suggestion, what happens if they want to add more links in a few months? You could also look into some design patterns for side drawer menu options as well. You can have them show just a bit ...


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It is indeed a specialised audience. They are doctors about to buy medical equipment. In some cases the category description helps them understand the products' functionalities better, the differences between them, why buy this instead of that etc. I agree that 4-5 paragraphs is too much info for an e-commerce store, but since the client is willing to ...


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You can make a prediction from the IP, fetch whatever content you believe is relevant, but allow the user to select a different destination. At the top of the home page add a large destination field that can be changed by the user. This field will be the first element to be loaded on the page, other related content will follow. The user may choose a ...


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Four or five paragraphs is a lot of information for an ecommerce site (unless it is very specialized and buyers need that information upfront - example you're selling elevators/elevator equipment - and the user base doesn't like "clicking"). Your second scenario is excellent and can come in a wide variety of flavors, divs that expand off to the side or ...


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The honest answer is it depends on the focus of the site and the general design and the demographics of the user base. Here is the list of steps I would suggest to figure out this problem Establish the maximum resolution which you plan to support by looking at the user demographics and analytics if available. This would help you establish your maximum ...


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You don't need a modal; instead, have it straight on the site: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups This way the user isn't blocked by a modal. However, the downside is this is an added layer before they can start shopping, but it won't be intrusive in any way. Also, this can be saved by cookies so it won't be a ...


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Negative First Experience You've already pointed out the first problem. Access to the site isn't exactly blocked, but the first impression of your brand and web experience for a user, all hinges on the quality and implementation of a popup. According to NNG popups are the most hated advertising technique While you're exactly advertising, it's clear that ...


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There are several different ways I have seen this done, Some companies tell you prior to you submitting payment while for other companies you see that once you have paid and look on the "order tracking" pages. A specific example which I feel works very well is as follows: The company is Very. When you submit an order you are taken to the order delivery ...


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Customers don’t want to buy a product, they want to find a solution to their problem. So you should organize your site based on the function of your products. Since both versions (cloud based and non-cloud based) serve the same function, I recommend you to group them together. Find bellow two alternative suggestions : You can divide existing product slides ...


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If the website they are moving to is perceived as more secure, or more authoritative then conversions are likely to increase. Example is Paypal In your specific case if the partner is a better known ticket office or the actual service provider itself (i.e. a theatre) then the user will know everything is "official" and unlikely to have any hitches. ...


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I think that this quite recent article (June 2014) about the "Sign Up" button can help: the author changed the “Sign Up” button to “Try it Free” and clicks increased by 212% (more data in the article). His thesis is that the standard "Sign Up" buttons don't work because "they ask for blind commitment" and "do not offer any value". Visitors also "see common ...


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Make it yours is the better option here for reasons already mentioned. But it's probably better vs. Contact Us, as opposed to being the ideal phrase. The user is not making it theirs by clicking this button, even though this language is more compelling than Contact Us. Contact Us is too generic and might also have a negative association, like when users are ...


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A/B testing is definitely the best way to answer your question. However, I agree that "Make it Yours" would encourage the user to move forward in your flow since it is contextually relevant. "Contact Us" is more conventional, but it is also generic. As a user, I'm not sure if this CTA actually has anything to do with the product I just configured. I could ...


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It depends on page to page. When you want a user to do one defined action you direct him with a call to action button. Giving too many might lead to the analysis paralysis or in most cases it makes all if them look equally important and thus leading to lesser conversions.


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From what you've described of the user flow, "Make it yours" speaks to your user in the context she's in and clearly indicates the next step. Now, in your specific case the underlying question is: "Should I use a CTA with more casual/friendly language or direct language in this case?" and the truth is... we don't know for sure. The best way to find out ...


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Just by reading the "Make it yours" it already sounds more compelling than a generic contact us. A friendly and inviting language can be a great approach. The more transparent and human it is the better. From an user point of view I always find that when website use friendly and almost daring language, it tends to captivate me more than the most common ...


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Jakob Nielsen warns about using automatic popups (even though old javascript popups aren't technically the same thing as modal windows, they have the same basic function) - http://www.nngroup.com/articles/most-hated-advertising-techniques/. These surveys are based on ads and not regular site content, but I think that there's a big chans that the users will ...


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There seems to be a common misconception that different apps should have different UX. I contend that what is good for ECRM is also good for a supply chain application. Ask them if they would like different UX design in Work versus Excel. Find some standard guideline to support that UX design. I personally don't like modal. I found this in some Microsoft UX ...


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On a very general notice, enterprise applications tend to favor speed over good UX making it harder to learn but faster to operate once you’ve learned the application. This is a very different approach from a customer application where UX is (and should be) the top priority. Having it this way is kind of legacy from the first enterprise application run on ...



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