New answers tagged

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The principle of tinder comes from card sorting techniques. As you stated in your question, in first iteration, user will have a big "yes list". In next iterations, passively, you can divide that bigger yes list into smaller parts. In such workflow, the priority items can be found and new counter-offers can be generated for convincing user. In the end, ...


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You could treat this similar to an ecommerce system that has "wishlist" facility in addition to ordering using a cart system. Hence admin can add the 100 items to a wishlist. Whenever admin is ready to order, wishlist is browsed and items required added to cart. Wishlist should have ability to order by for instance, aplhabetically, product type, price, ...


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I recommend using tag for that purpose. It's an easy way that a product belongs to several categories I leave two links that refer to topic Do non-technical/non-web savvy users understand the concept of tags? What is the expected paging behavior of a tree? Greetings.


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Looking from the point of a User, if you go to an e-commerce website you are going to browse and shop, so initially you want to be able to search for a desired product or browse a category of products. Filtering / sorting is also a good way to go here, especially if there is a lot of products to scroll through in each category. Once a product peaks some ...


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The ability to categorize products by brands is something I have found to be very popular on e-commerce websites. I have found that people often like a particular brand, and offering them other products by their favorite brands is a really good idea. Favourites/Wishlist allows you to tell a customer when something they like is on special and gives them a ...


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Compare with other products/brands. Compare with other retailers. Chase missing items ("Where's my stuff?"). Return items. Change account details (Password, delivery address, etc). I'm sure there are more but those are the first that spring to mind.


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TL;DR: Combination of both - choose a default, and inform users what happened. I'd suggest a notification along the top of the page, which is dismissed on user action, or when user navigates to next page without choosing an action: doesn't interrupt the flow for those users, where country was guessed correctly gives insight into what happened and how to ...


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Both your solutions are valid, but my guess you're asking this question is that you lack the insight on will they know under which currency and country they want to browse under from the beginning and/or when users will want to switch. i'd suggest a combination of both, where you ask the user to select when they 1st use the shop, and then educated the user ...


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They will also be presented with 'Add to wishlist' and 'Add to basket' buttons, and the option to pay for the product with ApplePay straight away. Is it possible to add a choice: "View details"? So, scanning the barcode would result in a screen with four options: Buy now (ApplePay) Add to basket Add to wishlist View product details The final option ...


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The fact that the person is willing to go through the trouble of scanning the bar code of an item probably means he or she is interested in that particular product, therefore it would be the most logical step to send this person to a page which mainly focuses on this product to give the user more information about it. You could obviously build both and A/B ...


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If the app also contains the product page then the barcode scanner could be described as a quick way of finding the product within the catalogue - in this case, sending the user to the regular product page would seem to be the most consistent solution. If, on the other hand, the app does not contain the product page then there is not enough info about the ...


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It sounds like a great idea with the exception that you can't guarantee who the user is buying for and therefor can't guarantee that the size you have selected is either theirs or is suitable for the person they are buying for. If you do use this then I think you really have to make sure the user is aware that it's happening otherwise you may end up with ...


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That would be a nice behaviour, to default the size in the product page to the filter selection. However you want to take care of instances whereby user buy without confirming their sizes. By not selecting the size in advance for them, you forced them to make the decision of choosing and hence reduce the chance of error or goods returned. To handle such ...


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Dizzying options a click away Zappos does a pretty nice job of dealing with this problem. Many of the shoes they carry are available in all sorts of color combinations and sizes. There are also plenty of related products that, to some extent, are part of the whole purchase consideration and should be readily available even from the detail page. They've ...


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Alright, so since this is a shopping app, I assume there is no arm in jumping to previous items at will? If so, I have the feeling a persitant "history" would work best. This is a little proposition, might be way above your scope. Let me know!


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First thing first Nobody is removing CTAs. In any case, some sites are (well, I think they did it some time ago) removing CERTAIN CTAs. In the specific case you mention, the Add to Cart button. As to why are they doing it, it may be many reasons. But answering a part of your question As UX designers, have any of you made this change on your site? What ...


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As a general design question, I think it is not unusual for design trends to change, if only to adjust to the change in user behaviour since the last wave of design trends. So I suppose in general you can look at the 'trend' as being something that is part of a constant change in design ideas, and the other part being driven by specific factors in the ...


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Exposure = Revenue (the business side) The cognitive goods matrix: There are goods you are aware you need. This is your shopping list. There are goods you are unaware you need. This is the stuff you forgot to put on your shopping list. There are goods you are aware you want, but you don't exactly need them. Like a book you have on your wishlist, but you ...


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In order to join an e-commerce trust network, it is often mandatory to have users confirm agreeing to the terms exactly at that page. Or by law. It is not always a choise. Prestashop has conveniently implemented this the right way. Customers are also used to it, because of it being enforced by law or trust organisations. It will not have much effect on the ...


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In my many years designing brand ecommerce experiences, the optimal solution in my opinion is: download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups This allows the user to access the Terms & Conditions prior to purchase if they so desire (the link should open in a new tab), which can often alleviate customer service headaches for ...


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T&Cs acceptance conventionally takes the form of a required checkbox on the payment screen, typically the last element on the page before the call to action. This is also how we do it in our apps. I think this makes more sense than anywhere else, because the T&Cs apply specifically to the transaction, and while the entire process could be defined ...



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