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2

Assuming you want to do right to your customer (and store) by making the payment and shipping flow as short and hassle-less as possible, I'd offer them the option to choice as soon as possible A. 'Quick pay purchase' with PayPal (Or 'x-click purchase', or..) B. Manual check-out (or whomever you like to call the 'native' option) If they choose A, you can ...


1

Despite appearances, navigating long lists of alpha-numerical data seems an unrealistic scenario for bra shopping. Women generally know their bra size, and unless they're shopping for outlying sizes e.g. very large, their investigation is more likely to be primarily driven by style (type), color, and price. Once they've homed in on a product, the sizes, ...


1

Customers can either combine a piece with more from the same set/collection (e.g. bra and knickers in lingerie or parts of a formal suit) or they freely choose parts of an outfit and a set or piece can also be shown in a different fabric, color, pattern or design. This can be divided – also visually or by gestures – into horizontal and vertical alternatives ...


2

I would absolutely save the users cart. You could do this by checking to see when the cart was last updated in your database for example or cross-referencing the User ID with the Cart ID to check if the user has left the site but with a cart full of goodies. Then - you have a few options: Save the cart - and re-instantiate the cart when they come back ...


4

General rules of thumb: it should not save any personal info unless I asked it too (such as credit card info--people don't trust a site that is storing their personal data without their permission) it should save non-personal info for my convenience (such as my shopping cart--if it's saved, I'm more likely to finish my purchase)


0

For our product, which is case management (not a retail or commercial product) I started implementing new pagination. It is compact and has a field for user entry and there is a dropdown.


1

Let’s say you need a million codes tops. We’ll use a friendly scheme that has a milliard/billion possible combinations, but could be scaled up easily, so not every possible combination yielded a valid coupon code. Get a list of 1000 short and frequent non-vulgar words, preferably from the same category, e.g. just nouns. Randomize their order. Assign to each ...


2

If you need a lot of different unique codes it matters whether the user will have to manually type it in, and it will have to be generated algorithmicly. Typed in Manually For something they'll have to type in, and still sufficiently random, I've done this before by generating a string like GHJ5-JKG4. Start by picking a random number between 0 and 31. ...


1

Without any additional rules that would define what values can be used for a coupon code (or any restrictions), I recommend something that would be (1) easy to remember and (2) something that sort of describes the kind of discount that can be obtained. Examples: SAVE25%OFF FREESHIPPING WIDGET123 (Product name like you suggested - at least it implies that ...


1

For what it’s worth, the plus sign is probably more universally understood than the concept of shopping cart / basket / bag. It does not necessarily mean ‘Add X to Y’, however, but ‘Increase Amount of X’ – by 1 if not indicated otherwise – which may include automatic addition of another X to Y, especially if there is already at least 1 X in Y. Where amounts ...


3

While the plus icon may be widely understood as "add", I would say it's a big risk to rely solely on it without any context. If localization is not feasible, my inclination would be to test an icon that shows a plus or arrow with a cart next to it, and also make this a very strong CTA using color/size/layout.


0

You can use (a) pre-designed silhouettes or (b) customized avatars Silhouettes depicting archetypes will focus on the classifications (in this case, age/gender) rather than the avatars themselves. However, to be widely understandable, your depictions will probably be stereotypical in some way: thus, they might be offensive to some users. For example, a ...


6

None of your avatars resemble my appearance at all, so I would have to select based on other criteria. I might pick the lower right one, because I think he looks cute. I'm a 60+ woman. Even among those who pick an avatar based on some similarity to their own appearance the similarity might be in skin color (already mentioned in another answer), hair color, ...


0

You cannot trust what users will tell you. The medical field has experienced this for ages. However is that essential? You could just ask for an age-group instead. I've seen its value in research by Forrester and many others. Asking for less precise data could yield the same relevance but preserving a little user anonymity might get your further. Without ...


0

Here is what to do: 1 - Make sure your current design is buttoned up. There are "+" amongst "Remove" labels. Go one way or the other. "Add Color" seems like an open text field you will need to consider misspelling, corrections and data validation. Having a forced user constraint like a dropdown or checkbox group might help. This is an instance where ...


5

Others have mentioned already that avatars not always correspond to the person's true gender and/or age. Another problem is that a number of people will struggle with understanding what avatar represents what age group. From the above avatars you showed, I'm struggling with figuring out who is the teenage woman and who is the 20-40 year old. I believe the ...


0

Just a thought: You could model avatars based on distinct personas you created earlier in the UX process and let the user choose one of these taht he finds himself fitting into. You could use this information to further engineer the UX process for the set of users that picked same persona.


21

Users pick avatars that are not always representative of their "real life" appearance. Often picking an avatar which doesn't match their true age/gender/ethnicity etc. This concept of an avatar allowing you to present yourself differently than in real life I imagine is strongly embedded with users. So if you want to capture real data you would be best of ...


10

If you need a piece of information from the user, ask for it. Trying to trick it out of them is likely to get you bad data (in particular, female users will often pick male avatars to hide their gender, and a significant subset of male users will pick female avatars), and may backfire if users realize you're trying to trick them.



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