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1

I would argue that sometimes a business doesn't scale its products. K.I.S.S. is a thing. Representing a clear path to finding what you are offering is key. If search does not produce results that beneefit your users - you don't need it. It's a feature for consideration just like any other feature. Test your navigation, test your content, let users tell you ...


0

Agree. Yes, you dont know what a user may be looking for. Phone number, careers, return policy, shipping info, contact info? Also search logs help tell you whats important and what you need to more easily surface. You can improve ia and design with search knowledge


0

The answer is, YES Because, who knows about the small e-commerce site's feature? It means that the site might grow as soon with lot of products and categories. We have to keep in our mind that even though small retail site or small company sites, it should be very scalable in terms of easily accessible and user experience. Rather than using pagination or ...


0

Definitely diversify e-commerce section for these two segments. There is two approaches to it, depending on the context. Diversified pages in the overall site structure: "Solutions for Businesses" and "Solutions for the Clients". Each page has to suggest a sensible overview of the product advantages and a CTA or multiple CTAs throughout the content ...


1

Try to do a larger research, there are many companies that are doing well on both B2B and B2C market and the difference is not just an eshop. Pick companies similar to yours (size, business...) and look for interesting techniques and their implementation. Also case studies published by digital agencies working on such projects might help a lot.


2

I believe you should go back to the previous page/step and go with the second option, where the user is notified the purchase has been cancelled and give him the option to go back and try again (they might have chosen to click back to correct something, so they'd expect the operation to be cancelled/paused). but take these things in consideration: During ...


1

If you look at a large ecommerce site like Amazon, "categories" aren't really treated as definitive categories where a product belongs to a single category. They act more like a predefined set of tags. A product can belong under multiple categories. Example from Amazon Some shoppers may care about the material of the shower, others may care that it's ...


2

I'd suggest number 3. The typical order would be: Manufacturer - Product Line - Product - Descriptor - Differentiator. Each item appears as an increasingly specific detail to categorise it within the previous element, much like you might use a directory based file path to identify a file on a drive. The identifiers depend on the product and its categories ...


2

I have always seen it done like #4, I think the idea behind it is to put the differentiating text at the end because it helps keep layout and easier to scan for differences. The first part thats the same keeps in line although the measurements differ, this makes it easier to see that everything else is the same: Epic 13 Shower Stall with Center Drain (33" ...


0

Along the lines of the first answer -- the link to Order Details points to the product detail page, which has a full description, reviews, specs, etc., AND a button to Buy/Download. Your table is sort of like an order-confirmation, or wish list. See example below The table serves as a record of items ordered or purchased. As for the Review link, is ...


1

I would link the Order ID to the Order Details page. Just seems logical to me. I think I would want the link to act the way you describe item 8 - Access. I'm not sure why you would need to go to a product description page after you have purchased the item. In theory, you know what you have purchased. However, I would also assume that from the page that ...


0

You can give search list according to the category selected by the user but in the search field if the user types for a product name there you can suggest products of same name in different category. So the user will get an idea about the product even if they don't know the exact category of the product.


0

Use Search and Filter Let your main search to be available always to perform a search in all categories. Once user chooses a category from the shop by drop down. Provide him the products which you think what he is looking for according to your analytics. Now allow him to filter on the selected shop by/category. Search Let the search hang there when ever ...


2

I submit that you can't go too far with humanization. Just look at the Ling's Cars website and how it goes crazy overboard with it...but it not only works, it has worked well. Take a look at their employees page. http://www.lingscars.com/meet-staff.php#models It's hard to be so masterfully tacky, tasteless, and make millions. But, the world's worst ...


0

Store credit. Wallets are things you use in several stores. So for example if I get money from amazon to put in my wallet, I can go and spend it on ebay.com. But what you're describing is limited to just the website you're currently on, more like a coupon or gift certificate. In other words, not 'portable'.


0

I'd go with 'Account credit'. Here in the UK, 'store' is more something you do rather than somewhere you go - you go to the shop. Appreciate that cultural boundaries are blurring, but I think that particularly for international use, everyone has an 'account' with you, but not everyone will immediately get the 'store credit' reference. On a related note: ...


0

I agree there is no rule here, but in my opinion, Wallet credit is a far more vague and ambiguous concept than store credit. You should aim to have descriptive labels that match real life context. In this particular situation I would advice to go with store credit as its more descriptive and more aligned with e-commerce particularly if users could also ...


0

Edit: I think I misunderstood the question a bit. You're referring to credits and not the storage medium. In this case, Store credit makes more sense. To draw a parallel, you put "currency" in your physical wallet and not "wallet currency". Hence for an e-commerce setup, Store credit or credit would be the more appropriate term. Example - "You've received ...


7

When it begins to feel disingenuous, which is nearly always. In fact, most attempts at 'humanization' result in absurdities that people are so numb to by now they just ignore it. It's just noise at this point. Why generate more noise? Do something more productive. "Hello! Welcome to our site! What would you like to do today?" This is, for some reason, ...


73

I would say it's too humanized if it hinders the users in finding the information they visited the site for in the first place. I once visited the website of the local supermarket to find out their opening hours on a holiday. I entered every menu option i could see, but couldn't find the opening times. Instead, I found a lot of pictures of smiling ...


4

Humanizing is OK as a design tool if used sparingly, though I think people are smart / cynical enough not to be fooled by it. What ever you do DO NOT ANIMATE. Sounds are even worse. This is extremely distracting to the user. The user has come to your website to perform a task and you are effectively trying to hijack their attention. All those who remember ...


111

Humanization is no different from any other design technique Like many other design approaches, humanizing an interface has advantages and disadvantages and as such, is correspondingly prone to overuse and misuse. I'm not a fan of humanizing as a goal. Websites are not humans, and trying to humanize a website is useful only if it actually improves user ...


20

An experience is overly personal when it shares irrelevant details that get in the way of the message. Humanizing is just explaining things in terms of people rather than systems, not telling someone’s life story for no reason.


2

This sounds like it only applies to websites that want to sell you something. I definitely wouldn't see this coming from websites that want you to use their free product. For example, I definitely wouldn't see it coming from a site that boasts a new Javascript framework, or a site that promotes community service, etc. It also relies heavily on whether or ...


3

Besides anything, take a look to the "Which Color Converts the Best?" article and then How To Design Call to Action Buttons That Convert. Just in case you don't want to read them, the absolute answer is "could be anything". In your specific case, yellow is quite possibly the best choice because of contrasting and disruption of the palette, but you'll need to ...


1

Since the only color added would be to the call to action I would certainly suggest using the yellow button. why? Color is very important when trying to create emphasis. I wrote a post on my blog that recommended you let your hyperlinks shine. Well, your call-to-action buttons should shine even brighter. After all, if you’re using them correctly, these ...



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