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-1

I would go for that:(mockup style, need some design)


0

There are two cases here, Users can select items and the cart then groups them to offer discounts / combos as applicable. There are certain predefined combos, with limited variation possible to be selected by the user. Users would be more interested in the items they want to eat and not precisely looking for combos or at times interested in the combos ...


0

Probably not Remember that the user's perspective is different from the app developer's perspective. What is the user looking for? I would guess that your users will want to look at the menu and order items they like. This is certainly what they would do at a restaurant. Any configuration would take place after they make the initial selection (eg "do ...


0

The solution to this question would ideally be affected depending on the engineering constraints, the size adn scope of the task, and the stage of the product, but it is common to err on the side of simplicity when coming up with a design solution. While fundamentally it isn't confusing for the user to configure options while in cart view, there are limits ...


0

In my opinion, if e-merchants place all the necessary information on only single page, that will be fine for the customers. I am of this opinion because I myself using one page checkout and given awesome results. Initially, I have to spend money on purchasing a one step checkout module from FME Modules, but the returning were more than the price.


2

In general, the add to cart button is meant to enable users to buy multiple items with a single checkout action. When you enabled buying one ebook at a time, this option was redundant, however, now it does enable: purchasing multiple items using the same payment method and same shipping address (or same email address for download links) reducing shipping ...


1

I don't think this is an area where UX design patterns are going to be helpful, because this isn't a well defined enough user flow that a reasonable pattern can emerge. That said, if I were designing this app and looking for helpful examples, I would assemble a taxonomy of something like the following sites: Banking and payment sites which offer ...


1

Add to cart is a good option if you would like to sell multiple items at one purchase. This strategy works well with physical goods in order to increase the total amount of acquisition and reduce the price of delivery cost for the company. I think that if the user clicks on add to cart, the page should provide some extra books that are similar to the ...


0

I think the simplest way would be to have an action/button that indicates a flipping action, and a separate label that show whether it is the front of back of the shirt being shown (especially if it is not obvious because of the collar). This way you can separate the trigger from the image and perhaps allows you more flexibility in case you want to change ...


2

Actually many sites nowadays provide this feature. And it's useful not because it's a trending one but people feel that it saves them time as it avoids minimum of 2 page reloads. But the idea of having add to card as very small text is a bad one. It would be better if both are buttons. 1. Add to cart can be bigger and the primary option 2. Below that can ...


0

This is a security issue with all “In – app Purchase or Payment” method due to phishing attack. Yahoo! uses a technique which is called “Sign in Seal”. Using that method, Yahoo! users create a seal (normally an image) which is stored in Yahoo! servers and is bound to a random generated token and that token is stored in a cookie on client side. This way when ...


2

I would use a vertical draggable separator that reveals the front and back sides as you drag it with your mouse or finger. Something like this: Edit: it depends on what you mean by "shop index page". If it's an array of dozens of items, then the best option would be to have front & back views side-by-side. If, however, I assumed correctly and the ...


1

I would suggest showing both a front and back view of the shirt in one photo/view.


0

You could try one of the following: A simple flip icon; Click/Tap on the image flips it (you would have to separate the click from image and title).


0

How about prompting the user to sign up only when he leaves the site? By saying, we can see you have shortlisted few items..do you want us to save it for you - Yes save it should lead to sign up?


6

I don't think there is any great benefit in having both "Buy Now" and "Add to Cart" options, if the only difference is that one takes the customer straight to the checkout. I think it's an unnecessary complication that forces the customer to think about which route they should follow. The traditional paradigm of adding products to a cart and then checking ...


0

I think that your checkout process is clear enough without the order summary as an additional "check" for the customer. The most common process would be the following: Cart Summary Delivery Payment Confirmation/Thank you Lots of people use their online shopping cart as an informal shortlist. They are basically curating the contents of their order after ...


-2

NO need to show all details. Just Product thumbnail, name and quantity. Customer has already made up his mind to buy something and that is why he has put it in his cart. Also showing too much information may distract the customer. This is my opinion. You can consider A/B test. I was doing this study and research for more than 3 months for my company and ...


0

It's hard to think about this UX without knowing what exactly you're selling, but in principle what you're describing works just fine. For example, if you are selling a set of complex services which require an inquiry before sale, it's reasonable to enqueue a set of items for batch or package inquiry: This might work for other complex/packaged products ...


7

For most commerce sites, you do not want to lead the customer on or p*ss the customer off. Therefore, letting the customer know as early as possible is the best practice. If you can determine the location beforehand (e.g. using the methods that @skwotz outlined), then you can filter products accordingly. But sometimes sites cannot tell where the customer ...


4

It's best to let people know this as soon as possible. It is very disappointing to get halfway through check out only to realize you can't get it shipped to where you want. A lot of large ecomm sites have a modal when you first arrive at the site to select a country. http://www.louisvuitton.com/ I've seen ones where they bring you to a browse only section ...



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