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3

There are several reasons for decisions like this: Mobile apps tend to favor simplicity over efficiency. The quick view is a convenience feature that can potentially make the app more confusing/cluttered without helping deliver on the core functionality. Features like the quick view make it faster to use the app, but end up being more confusing for users. ...


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It really depends on how much information you're showing with the product to me. If you're just showing the product image, price and name I wouldn't set a limit on how many across you can go at all. As long as the information can breathe, it looks nice and it's easy to follow.


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Yahoo small business website uses 920px and displays maximum 3 products in a row. I find it displaying good on mobile phones if not excellent. Sorry, missed the question heading last time, thanks for pointing out


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Quick note, 'Shopping Cart' it typically two words. So you actually are dealing with 3 words. I think you reducing the size is fine, but... ...keep in mind that word wrapping is not something that should be a focus. The web is flexible. That's one of the great things about it. And part of that flexibility is not having 100% control over typography. ...


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You could simply replace the word with the shopping icon. It simply becomes a symbol for the words you want in that space and is more of a universal graphic to convey the same information. On smaller screens your options are either making your text smaller (which can hamper legibility depending on the font especially) versus the layout you want.


2

Is activation absolutely required before continuing the process? If not, you might try something like this: Checkout form is one page. At the top is two or three fields for registration: email address, password, maybe their name. Then below that is just their payment information. When they submit the form, it logs them in and takes them to their dashboard. ...


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I assume the ordering food as a service for direct consumption rather than buying ingredients. If this is the case, I think that overall process can be clustered as; Defining the order (selecting meal and delivery hours, extra sauces etc..) Completing the order While user is defining the order, the delivery hour can have influence on the selection of ...


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Thinking of customers' decision points, you could design good checkout process. Decision points are the points, where customer ask question to herself, should she continue or exit the process? So decision points work like funnel. Obviously not all the visitors of the checkout page will purchase the items. But letting funnel to trigger early, allowing the ...


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Why would you want users to search for a category and then let them search for a specific item within this category? If I search for "TV" I want to browse the TVs, compare them, so I can make an informed decision. If I want a 40inch LED TV I would change my search query accordingly or use filters to select 40inch and LED. So I don't really see the use for ...


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The last step is only meant to review and confirm the order, not to change it. By making it read-only and not editable, you give the user more confidence in that he/she does not change something by accident, just before finally confirming the order. So I suggest to have the last step read-only and offer a link "Change order" or "I want to change the order" ...



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