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24

There are factors outside of how users behave on your site that might determine whether you use one or the other. For comparison sites or shopping searches it's important to get a high listing and a low headline price often helps - the first challenge is getting people to visit your site. High traffic with higher dropout is normally more profitable than ...


13

The zoom feature mainly came into the picture to allow users to examine a product in detail and overcome the challenges involved in actually being able to handle the merchandise before buying it.This is especially common in sites which sell products like clothes or products where users might want to get a closer look at the product before making a purchase. ...


12

Your shipping and billing information is pretty crucial to the process of placing an order. If it's incorrect, your order will be misdelivered (not cool) or you won't be able to charge the customer correctly for the order. Like any input that has such huge consequences for a software process, it is good UX to allow the user to review this essential ...


7

I would combine the waiting list and a fix time slot and get the benefits of both. Waiting lists aren't just helpful when tickets are getting short. You can use them even if your course is sold out for days to resale returning tickets. A fix time slot sets the user a bit under pressure (in a good way) and, different from a refreshing session timeout, ...


7

An A/B test experiment can help determine the answer since it can go either way depending on the type of users on your site and the type of 'conversion' you're referring to (purchased, view product detail, sign up for account..etc). My assumption is that adding the product category will encourage the users to click on category and view more related ...


7

Most e-Commerce sites have different shipping options. For example it may be "Free Delivery" for standard delivery, $5 for "Next Day Delivery" or $10 for "Saturday Delivery". If this was a T-Shirt company for example, and the cost of the "t-shirt" was $50, and the cost for the shipping (by an external company such as DHL) was $10 then it would be better to ...


5

www.eventbrite.com, event management/registration service, uses option #3, which is probably the best approach:


5

Use drop down if you have more than 5-6 sizes, to reduce clutter. If you have up 5 options then radio button's present complete visibility, some good examples of best practice attached: This product only has 3 sizes, so radio buttons or visibly selectable fields are the best options here. But with an item such as shirts, with a number of neck size ...


4

After half an hour of searching the web, I found nothing relevant to your question of case studies. I did however find the UXMovement article Increasing eCommerce Conversion Rates: Category Page which has an insightful section on sorting. Sorting is rearranging the order in which a group of products is shown. For example, if you have a set of cars you’re ...


4

Off the top of my head, I don't know any other stores that do this. However, your idea of not switching over to another page makes sense. If I were to go through a person-to-person interaction in my mind, it would sound something like this: "Customer: I'd like to buy one of these shirts. Sales: Great, what color would you like? Customer: Red please. Sales: ...


4

Not only that, it's encouraged to do so. the main reason is to increase "findability". If buyers (users) can't find the product they're after - it won't get sold. Because of that, there is a long checklist to follow when adding categories to an e-commerce site, all of it, by Christian Holst. All of the bullets isn't category related, but it shows the ...


4

People generally only buy flowers if it's for an occasion/season (eg. Birthday,Christmas) or if they want to express an emotion (eg.Sympathy, Apology, Congratulatory) The flow can be: User goes to the site and can Browse current featured/seasonal items. Select Occasion to browse by other Occasions. Select Bouquet. Customize if needed. Reasoning: Users ...


4

There are several reasons for decisions like this: Mobile apps tend to favor simplicity over efficiency. The quick view is a convenience feature that can potentially make the app more confusing/cluttered without helping deliver on the core functionality. Features like the quick view make it faster to use the app, but end up being more confusing for users. ...


4

It's not particularly difficult to support a hover on desktop, but a click on mobile. The more important question is this: what are you hiding? As my friends at Hot Studio used to tell me (before Facebook ate them), you never want to make the user wait for the UI. As I subsequently tell others, the job of your interface is to inform, not entertain. Once ...


4

I think its bit tricky question. Its totally depends on the your target market. If your target market is mature enough you can have add to cart button straight forward. but if not they have to dig into details. Using model box option may make this much easier. But i recommend to have both options.


4

Depends on the business. Sometimes a customer already knows what they're looking for, or has previously shopped and made the decision, and being able to "grab and check out" is convenient. I don't think forcing another click (and then a return-to-list click) will cost you many consumer sales. Pros want as much streamlining as they can get.


4

One of the main reasons might be that a lot of companies use the Address Verification System to match the entered address against the cardholder's address (assuming a Credit/Debit Card payment takes place). In this case you'll need the billing address. So this is the address you need anyway - and in a lot of cases the billing address will match the shipping ...


4

I would advise strongly against removing the step, but to add it as optional step instead. There are a lot of reasons why the billing and shipping address could differ, e.g. people order goods to be sent to their offices people purchase goods as presents some people simply have a second address ... That being said, here's the main reason why you need the ...


4

There are quite a few usability concerns with option one which I would caution against: You are making the assumption that users can understand that the word prepaid and it has a whole list of options namely credit card, debit card and netbanking. The user is left to make an assumption about the word prepaid entails which can lead to many ...


4

Here is a Google's Adsense heatmap. You're right, the lower left is comparatively less hot to place ads or promotions or banners than say top left or center. In your case, you don't want to place the banners on top right because it is annoying and will be in the way of accessing the main functionality. Hence, the benefits of moving it to the bottom left ...


3

If plugin breaks (temporary outage, deprecation, whatever) it is your site whose reputation is damaged, not FB's Extra resources to load => slower site Prominence of other brands dilutes your own if you were to write a list of stack-ranked goals for each page of your site I doubt that "send people to our Twitter" would make the cut, yet I assume its ...


3

The ecommerce company I work for uses modals (pop-ups) to show a quick view of products. Google Analytics doesn't detect this interaction (no trigger was set on it either) so I don't have any data of people who click on the quickview vs. people who navigate to the products detail page. After implementation the effect of it (on conversion rates or something ...


3

Here are some suggestions Auto complete and suggested results in the search results: I assume your site has a search feature and you can use auto complete as well as suggested results to help users find what they are looking for. To quote this uxmag article When users type in a search field, it’s nice to give them some suggested autocompleted ...


3

LukeW and Etre ran some tests that compared a single page, multiple page, and accordion version of the same generic e-commerce checkout form (personal, shipping, and billing info). They measured standard usability and eye-tracking data for each. The results did seem to indicate that simply porting the same questions from one long web page to several web ...


3

I think you could combine Order view and Package view. The atomic item is a Package, as it is shipped independently. So default view is detailed package view, which could be ordered by status or other column name. The table also supports folding packages into a Order view, when all packages are grouped by order and folded into one order line. User can unfold ...


3

I would imagine that for guest checkout, you will want to collect the payment at the point of checkout, so as to mitigate the risk of the customer not showing up to collect? So, you'll only accept payment by credit and debit cards for guest checkouts. You can entice your customer to create an online account by enabling more payment options such as ...


3

Keeping the "friction" low is vital. Amazon worked out early on that every additional click in their check-out process cost them something close to 50% of their sales - hence their development of a very smooth sales process. Here in New Zealand all of the major pizza delivery franchises chains have a similar approach: User registration is offered at the ...


3

Should each user try all four versions? Re-using the same user gives you the ability to statistically discriminate smaller performance differences among your versions, assuming you know the right statistics to apply (e.g., repeated-measures ANOVA, for task completion time). Re-using users allows you to factor out the users’ idiosyncratic differences (as ...


3

I think Quickview as an independent function is a necessary evil in that it loads faster than a product detail page. As a necessary step in a purchase pathway, it holds less value, likewise in all ideal cases, the product detail would carry its full weight in converting a transaction. Your true question of whether next/previous is useful or a gimmick - it's ...


3

Do it now. "With a paper prototype, you can user test early design ideas at an extremely low cost. Doing so lets you fix usability problems before you waste money implementing something that doesn't work." -- Jakob Nielsen It's not just about fixing "usability problems," but verifying your design decisions. The link goes to Nielsen's article on the ...



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