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63

There is no universal answer to this question, as which is a more important factor in a buying decision varies depending on: price; type of user; perceived quality; and type of purchase. Price In general price matters more for lower valued items and discount matters more for higher valued items Type of user Based on A/B testing and discussions with other ...


24

There are factors outside of how users behave on your site that might determine whether you use one or the other. For comparison sites or shopping searches it's important to get a high listing and a low headline price often helps - the first challenge is getting people to visit your site. High traffic with higher dropout is normally more profitable than ...


21

Users pick avatars that are not always representative of their "real life" appearance. Often picking an avatar which doesn't match their true age/gender/ethnicity etc. This concept of an avatar allowing you to present yourself differently than in real life I imagine is strongly embedded with users. So if you want to capture real data you would be best of ...


14

I took a course on Coursera. Beginners Guide to Irrational Behavior by Dan Ariely. The course addressed these kind of issues. As you would guess, people are irrational. Lets say a customer is buying a pen for $20 and you say to them, "The store down the road has the exact same pen for $10". They would be more likely to consider that a deal worth exploring ...


10

If you need a piece of information from the user, ask for it. Trying to trick it out of them is likely to get you bad data (in particular, female users will often pick male avatars to hide their gender, and a significant subset of male users will pick female avatars), and may backfire if users realize you're trying to trick them.


10

I agree with others that there are just too many variables (a good portion were exposed) to make a decision without A/B testing. btw, I think the image of the OP seems to be reducing the chances to a false dichotomy where one or the other (price or discount) must be the one "highlighted" in the final design, when in deed they could both have their ...


8

I don't think there's a perfect answer here but I know I lean towards Option A. People already know where to look for the price. You've trained them to look in one spot for a price so it's easy for them to find, they don't need an extra highlight to spot it. The discount is what sets this item apart from the others. Every product on this store has a ...


7

Most e-Commerce sites have different shipping options. For example it may be "Free Delivery" for standard delivery, $5 for "Next Day Delivery" or $10 for "Saturday Delivery". If this was a T-Shirt company for example, and the cost of the "t-shirt" was $50, and the cost for the shipping (by an external company such as DHL) was $10 then it would be better to ...


6

None of your avatars resemble my appearance at all, so I would have to select based on other criteria. I might pick the lower right one, because I think he looks cute. I'm a 60+ woman. Even among those who pick an avatar based on some similarity to their own appearance the similarity might be in skin color (already mentioned in another answer), hair color, ...


5

I think its bit tricky question. Its totally depends on the your target market. If your target market is mature enough you can have add to cart button straight forward. but if not they have to dig into details. Using model box option may make this much easier. But i recommend to have both options.


5

Others have mentioned already that avatars not always correspond to the person's true gender and/or age. Another problem is that a number of people will struggle with understanding what avatar represents what age group. From the above avatars you showed, I'm struggling with figuring out who is the teenage woman and who is the 20-40 year old. I believe the ...


5

Marketing Answer: The discount is most important! UX Answer: The actual price is most important!


4

People generally only buy flowers if it's for an occasion/season (eg. Birthday,Christmas) or if they want to express an emotion (eg.Sympathy, Apology, Congratulatory) The flow can be: User goes to the site and can Browse current featured/seasonal items. Select Occasion to browse by other Occasions. Select Bouquet. Customize if needed. Reasoning: Users ...


4

There are several reasons for decisions like this: Mobile apps tend to favor simplicity over efficiency. The quick view is a convenience feature that can potentially make the app more confusing/cluttered without helping deliver on the core functionality. Features like the quick view make it faster to use the app, but end up being more confusing for users. ...


4

It's not particularly difficult to support a hover on desktop, but a click on mobile. The more important question is this: what are you hiding? As my friends at Hot Studio used to tell me (before Facebook ate them), you never want to make the user wait for the UI. As I subsequently tell others, the job of your interface is to inform, not entertain. Once ...


4

Depends on the business. Sometimes a customer already knows what they're looking for, or has previously shopped and made the decision, and being able to "grab and check out" is convenient. I don't think forcing another click (and then a return-to-list click) will cost you many consumer sales. Pros want as much streamlining as they can get.


4

One of the main reasons might be that a lot of companies use the Address Verification System to match the entered address against the cardholder's address (assuming a Credit/Debit Card payment takes place). In this case you'll need the billing address. So this is the address you need anyway - and in a lot of cases the billing address will match the shipping ...


4

I would advise strongly against removing the step, but to add it as optional step instead. There are a lot of reasons why the billing and shipping address could differ, e.g. people order goods to be sent to their offices people purchase goods as presents some people simply have a second address ... That being said, here's the main reason why you need the ...


4

There are quite a few usability concerns with option one which I would caution against: You are making the assumption that users can understand that the word prepaid and it has a whole list of options namely credit card, debit card and netbanking. The user is left to make an assumption about the word prepaid entails which can lead to many ...


4

Here is a Google's Adsense heatmap. You're right, the lower left is comparatively less hot to place ads or promotions or banners than say top left or center. In your case, you don't want to place the banners on top right because it is annoying and will be in the way of accessing the main functionality. Hence, the benefits of moving it to the bottom left ...


4

General rules of thumb: it should not save any personal info unless I asked it too (such as credit card info--people don't trust a site that is storing their personal data without their permission) it should save non-personal info for my convenience (such as my shopping cart--if it's saved, I'm more likely to finish my purchase)


4

You could do some A/B testing to determine which approach is best but, as some other answers suggest, there may be no one size fits all solution. If you could start by randomly varying which number is given prominence and track how individual customers respond to this (i.e. are they clicking on more products with big discounts, or going for lower prices), ...


3

Any cut-off you make will be at an arbitrary point in time, which may make sense for some users- but by equal amount not make sense for those who require access to legacy information. If you have the capacity to retain and provide access to all records, absolutely do so. Implementing arbitrary cut-offs break usage logic for the most part. With this in ...


3

There is a great answer spcifically on how users respond to web page loading times here. For the particular site you linked to, I think the movement on all the items at once is quite distracting, and I would suggest that you limit the moving / animated items to the one that the user is currently focused on (hover for mouse, press for touch devices). Doing ...


3

I think buttons are better as well because it gives the user a full understanding of what sizes are available and how the garment is sized just at a glance. For example, a dress can be sized with letters (XS, S, M...) or numbers (00, 0, 2, 4), and all sizes might not be offered (XS, 00). Even if your sizing is generally consistent, it's still helpful to ...


3

There are a couple issues with how you want your page to display, personally I did not have any load times for the images but I am running on lightning speed internet at my work. The first is that sometimes it appears that one of the images may get stuck and the animation may not kick in so you have all these moving people but then one is standing still. I ...


3

The two solutions that you suggest are the extremes on a possible range of solutions. Often the best solution is somewhere in the middle. The fact that you've recognized them doesn't necessarily mean that your two only choices are forgetting and importing. One option is to say "Hi, we noticed that this email has already been used on this site. You can ...


3

Sorry to break the news for you, but assuming a task-based behaviour (meaning users enter your sites in order to do something), pop-overs are nothing but an annoying hurdle. If you create a task model for your users tasks, you'll notice there isn't a single place they need your popover. Even with an explorer behaviour, pop-overs are just an annoying ...


3

Why a pop-up at all? When a shopper adds an item they will arrive on the "cart page". Within that page you can offer an engagement / inducement section in a natural or 'conversational' flow. e.g. "Thanks for browsing with us. Like your style! If you leave us your email we'll be in touch about great offers." e.g. "Thanks for browsing with us. Nice ...


3

Sadly, I think you need to show it in Canadian at the end - otherwise if there's a problem, how the heck is the user supposed to even know what's going on, let alone do something about it? You're going to also need to show that Canadian number at the last step, to remind the user that they are paying in Canadian dollars, not -other currency- and that you ...



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