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111

Humanization is no different from any other design technique Like many other design approaches, humanizing an interface has advantages and disadvantages and as such, is correspondingly prone to overuse and misuse. I'm not a fan of humanizing as a goal. Websites are not humans, and trying to humanize a website is useful only if it actually improves user ...


73

I would say it's too humanized if it hinders the users in finding the information they visited the site for in the first place. I once visited the website of the local supermarket to find out their opening hours on a holiday. I entered every menu option i could see, but couldn't find the opening times. Instead, I found a lot of pictures of smiling ...


63

There is no universal answer to this question, as which is a more important factor in a buying decision varies depending on: price; type of user; perceived quality; and type of purchase. Price In general price matters more for lower valued items and discount matters more for higher valued items Type of user Based on A/B testing and discussions with other ...


22

Users pick avatars that are not always representative of their "real life" appearance. Often picking an avatar which doesn't match their true age/gender/ethnicity etc. This concept of an avatar allowing you to present yourself differently than in real life I imagine is strongly embedded with users. So if you want to capture real data you would be best of ...


20

An experience is overly personal when it shares irrelevant details that get in the way of the message. Humanizing is just explaining things in terms of people rather than systems, not telling someone’s life story for no reason.


14

I took a course on Coursera. Beginners Guide to Irrational Behavior by Dan Ariely. The course addressed these kind of issues. As you would guess, people are irrational. Lets say a customer is buying a pen for $20 and you say to them, "The store down the road has the exact same pen for $10". They would be more likely to consider that a deal worth exploring ...


14

Q: How many images must be in a carousel so that the user can see all of it? A: 1 In an interesting blog post about carousel interaction stats, Eric Runyon collected data on carousel interactions for various ND.edu web pages. What he found is that effectively users only interact with the first item in the carousel: A concise analysis of this data:


11

If you need a piece of information from the user, ask for it. Trying to trick it out of them is likely to get you bad data (in particular, female users will often pick male avatars to hide their gender, and a significant subset of male users will pick female avatars), and may backfire if users realize you're trying to trick them.


10

I agree with others that there are just too many variables (a good portion were exposed) to make a decision without A/B testing. btw, I think the image of the OP seems to be reducing the chances to a false dichotomy where one or the other (price or discount) must be the one "highlighted" in the final design, when in deed they could both have their ...


8

I don't think there's a perfect answer here but I know I lean towards Option A. People already know where to look for the price. You've trained them to look in one spot for a price so it's easy for them to find, they don't need an extra highlight to spot it. The discount is what sets this item apart from the others. Every product on this store has a ...


7

None of your avatars resemble my appearance at all, so I would have to select based on other criteria. I might pick the lower right one, because I think he looks cute. I'm a 60+ woman. Even among those who pick an avatar based on some similarity to their own appearance the similarity might be in skin color (already mentioned in another answer), hair color, ...


7

For most commerce sites, you do not want to lead the customer on or p*ss the customer off. Therefore, letting the customer know as early as possible is the best practice. If you can determine the location beforehand (e.g. using the methods that @skwotz outlined), then you can filter products accordingly. But sometimes sites cannot tell where the customer ...


7

I don't think there is any great benefit in having both "Buy Now" and "Add to Cart" options, if the only difference is that one takes the customer straight to the checkout. I think it's an unnecessary complication that forces the customer to think about which route they should follow. The traditional paradigm of adding products to a cart and then checking ...


7

When it begins to feel disingenuous, which is nearly always. In fact, most attempts at 'humanization' result in absurdities that people are so numb to by now they just ignore it. It's just noise at this point. Why generate more noise? Do something more productive. "Hello! Welcome to our site! What would you like to do today?" This is, for some reason, ...


6

Others have mentioned already that avatars not always correspond to the person's true gender and/or age. Another problem is that a number of people will struggle with understanding what avatar represents what age group. From the above avatars you showed, I'm struggling with figuring out who is the teenage woman and who is the 20-40 year old. I believe the ...


6

Marketing Answer: The discount is most important! UX Answer: The actual price is most important!


4

Here is a Google's Adsense heatmap. You're right, the lower left is comparatively less hot to place ads or promotions or banners than say top left or center. In your case, you don't want to place the banners on top right because it is annoying and will be in the way of accessing the main functionality. Hence, the benefits of moving it to the bottom left ...


4

There are quite a few usability concerns with option one which I would caution against: You are making the assumption that users can understand that the word prepaid and it has a whole list of options namely credit card, debit card and netbanking. The user is left to make an assumption about the word prepaid entails which can lead to many ...


4

General rules of thumb: it should not save any personal info unless I asked it too (such as credit card info--people don't trust a site that is storing their personal data without their permission) it should save non-personal info for my convenience (such as my shopping cart--if it's saved, I'm more likely to finish my purchase)


4

You could do some A/B testing to determine which approach is best but, as some other answers suggest, there may be no one size fits all solution. If you could start by randomly varying which number is given prominence and track how individual customers respond to this (i.e. are they clicking on more products with big discounts, or going for lower prices), ...


4

It's best to let people know this as soon as possible. It is very disappointing to get halfway through check out only to realize you can't get it shipped to where you want. A lot of large ecomm sites have a modal when you first arrive at the site to select a country. http://www.louisvuitton.com/ I've seen ones where they bring you to a browse only section ...


4

IP is, though, a good start. Using HTML5's location abilities is a good idea. What you are considering is something many sites have already figured out. I'd start by seeing what the other's already do. Look at large retailers with web sites that offer in-store pickup. Home Depot, Target, Walmart, etc. Ideally, you let people search everything and only ...


4

I think you need to see Uber app from a UX engineer's point of view. Make purchasing simple, clear, intuitive and elegant. I will be happy to give my users an option to cancel the order if they feel that they had purchased something wrong instead of putting an extra page for confirmation. Think it this way when you purchase an item you have an intent to do ...


4

Humanizing is OK as a design tool if used sparingly, though I think people are smart / cynical enough not to be fooled by it. What ever you do DO NOT ANIMATE. Sounds are even worse. This is extremely distracting to the user. The user has come to your website to perform a task and you are effectively trying to hijack their attention. All those who remember ...


3

While the plus icon may be widely understood as "add", I would say it's a big risk to rely solely on it without any context. If localization is not feasible, my inclination would be to test an icon that shows a plus or arrow with a cart next to it, and also make this a very strong CTA using color/size/layout.


3

If you need a lot of different unique codes it matters whether the user will have to manually type it in, and it will have to be generated algorithmicly. Typed in Manually For something they'll have to type in, and still sufficiently random, I've done this before by generating a string like GHJ5-JKG4. Start by picking a random number between 0 and 31. ...


3

For mobile users, the mailto can prove to be a life saver, they can type continuously on their mobile in their native email environment (natural for mobile?) and won't have to deal with "Tap- Enter detail -Tap again to hide Keyboard-Move downwards". Here's another thread on mobile mailto vs contact form: Contact form on mobile vs. mailto: link? For desktop, ...


3

When you validate an email address, you are checking two things: Is this a valid email? Does this user have access to this email? The only way to do 1. is to send an email, and check that it doesn't bounce. And the only way to do 2. is to send an email with some information and check that the user received that information. That can either be done by ...


3

as far as I know trust is a multidimensional construct (covering the dimensions of competence, benevolence and integrity) and therefore quite hard to grasp. That could explain why I couldn’t find any research related your particular question. With regarding to any UX related topic that hasn’t been empirically proven I always stick to practically proven ...


3

Many e-commerce sites provide redirection including popular sites like Amazon, Flipkart But I think instead of redirection the idea of pop-up or slide-in is really cool!! You can see the pop-up implementation in SnapDeal and I don't think there's anything against this approach. Checkout the snapshot: Hope this helps!!



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