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115

Humanization is no different from any other design technique Like many other design approaches, humanizing an interface has advantages and disadvantages and as such, is correspondingly prone to overuse and misuse. I'm not a fan of humanizing as a goal. Websites are not humans, and trying to humanize a website is useful only if it actually improves user ...


75

I would say it's too humanized if it hinders the users in finding the information they visited the site for in the first place. I once visited the website of the local supermarket to find out their opening hours on a holiday. I entered every menu option i could see, but couldn't find the opening times. Instead, I found a lot of pictures of smiling employees,...


22

An experience is overly personal when it shares irrelevant details that get in the way of the message. Humanizing is just explaining things in terms of people rather than systems, not telling someone’s life story for no reason.


20

YES, but.... In fact, you don't need to delete the promo code itself, but the association to the product. However, it's always good to delete the promo code as well, for the reasons below: Make your user's life easier You're building this for an user, and you're building an usability paradigm, thus this paradigm has to keep the user in mind. One of the ...


15

tl;dr Social confirmation is a good thing in most cases. Don't give up on it until you've exhausted all your options. Then try, try again. Reviews are not a required feature Not every site has the volume or customer interest to generate a lot of [good] reviews. I have personally seen this in two contexts: A product line that was primarily ...


11

Review's aren't always necessary or helpful I disagree with other posters who espouse the view that social reviews are desirable per se and one should exhaust efforts to enable social reviews on a site. There is nothing magical about social reviews: they are simply another design feature of a site which has pros and cons, and serves an objective. Reviews ...


9

Check your assumptions There are a few assumptions in your question that require validation (and I assure you that the ecomm giants are testing). Most people have big monitors now: Maybe. But what about their viewport? And who might you leave out when your target is everyone (like Amazon)? Older users often have their browser zoomed and don't even realize ...


8

When it begins to feel disingenuous, which is nearly always. In fact, most attempts at 'humanization' result in absurdities that people are so numb to by now they just ignore it. It's just noise at this point. Why generate more noise? Do something more productive. "Hello! Welcome to our site! What would you like to do today?" This is, for some reason, ...


6

One thing that hasn't been mentioned here is history. Do you need to know if a discount code applied to an order that has been placed in the past? If so, deleting the discount may lead to confusion if you are investigating the order - you may not know what discount was applied (it depends on if you save the discount information with the order or just keep ...


6

Good question without a definitive answer. In short, both long page and divided page has their advantages and disadvantages. You will not make a big mistake by using either one of them. Recently I had one publication on that specific topic which was accepted at the CHI conference which is the top HCI conference. Here is a link to download the article. ...


5

1) Ideally an order is generated once an user is done with the payment. You could call it Order summary, where an Order ID is usually attached to it for reference. At cart stage, "Delete Order" as an interaction does make much sense. To me, its ambiguous. 2) At cart, there are items - hence deletion should happen on each line item (product). 3) In special ...


5

One option is to use the label MAX or MAXIMUM :


5

It's usually behavioral design... Retail sites usually like customers to buy multiple products. Customers often enjoy clicking Buy, for several reasons (dopamine hit, save to cart for later, comparison shopping process, etc) However, seeing the total amount in a cart can cause buying hesitation for customers. By forcing the customer to click through to ...


5

Well, it's not "needed" by definition, this is something you'll need to research and eventually define. As a general rule, the more users, the most chances you'll have they review your product. This way, if you're selling knickers on a site with a big customer base, these customers will probably interact with a review system (whether it's reviewing or ...


4

Humanizing is OK as a design tool if used sparingly, though I think people are smart / cynical enough not to be fooled by it. What ever you do DO NOT ANIMATE. Sounds are even worse. This is extremely distracting to the user. The user has come to your website to perform a task and you are effectively trying to hijack their attention. All those who remember ...


4

Guess a lot I know that sounds kind of silly, but that's what it comes down to. You can analyze Sales figures Seasonal volume spikes Site analytics Customer service feedback Related case studies and so on But none of that will tell you the why behind the behavior you're seeing. So you're left with one option: make smart, experience-informed guesses. ...


3

Store credit. Wallets are things you use in several stores. So for example if I get money from amazon to put in my wallet, I can go and spend it on ebay.com. But what you're describing is limited to just the website you're currently on, more like a coupon or gift certificate. In other words, not 'portable'.


3

I submit that you can't go too far with humanization. Just look at the Ling's Cars website and how it goes crazy overboard with it...but it not only works, it has worked well. Take a look at their employees page. http://www.lingscars.com/meet-staff.php#models It's hard to be so masterfully tacky, tasteless, and make millions. But, the world's worst website....


3

This sounds like it only applies to websites that want to sell you something. I definitely wouldn't see this coming from websites that want you to use their free product. For example, I definitely wouldn't see it coming from a site that boasts a new Javascript framework, or a site that promotes community service, etc. It also relies heavily on whether or ...


3

Besides anything, take a look to the "Which Color Converts the Best?" article and then How To Design Call to Action Buttons That Convert. Just in case you don't want to read them, the absolute answer is "could be anything". In your specific case, yellow is quite possibly the best choice because of contrasting and disruption of the palette, but you'll need to ...


3

I definitely like the first option the best. The second one, although it looks nice, it kind of gives the appearance that there will be a different form for each delivery option. Also, if you don't like the radio button, you could use a different visual indicator, such as a green check mark.


3

There may be many reason to prefer a fixed layout instead of a responsive or a fluid one. This answer (in my opinion) can not be exhaustive unless it's applied to a specific case: I do not think there is a best solution that should always be used. You're asking about fluid layout (built using percentage of width) but there are also: responsive layout (built ...


3

Since you mentioned this is for people who are non-techy savvy, I would advice to be as clear as possible. See an attached suggestion. Few notes: 1) You could have this "Choose this option" bar persistent in all the cards, or have them come on "hover". On hover is a better idea, but then then one would need to hover first. So decide that on the context. 2)...


3

In short: You need to re-design the search results view ideally to improve the user experience. I assume you need an ideal solution to increase the cells of your company (business goal) in an easiest way for your users (users' goal)? Then it's not about the grid. It's about UX. Consider a user is searching for a jig blade. The search results are non-...


3

The most important issue is how to give customer confidence that the payment information they provide is protected. From this perspective, chat window is the worst possible option. A person will never feel secure giving out their private data over a chat channel. Even if you say it's absolutely secure. You may add Checkout button to chat window. This button ...


3

This is a bad idea because: Add visual clutter when you don't need it Users click into product details before buying because they require more information then just the name and image What if products had options, this wouldn't work I've worked on ecommerce long enough to know that the three thoughts are enough not to add buttons on the product category ...


3

Typically you place the more important content to the left. For some products (e.g. electronics), the description/specs are more important and would make sense to place it to the left. For others (e.g. fashion), the pictures are more important, so they go on the left, leaving the product name/description to the right. Of course, this is also something that'...


3

T&Cs acceptance conventionally takes the form of a required checkbox on the payment screen, typically the last element on the page before the call to action. This is also how we do it in our apps. I think this makes more sense than anywhere else, because the T&Cs apply specifically to the transaction, and while the entire process could be defined ...


3

Alright, so since this is a shopping app, I assume there is no arm in jumping to previous items at will? If so, I have the feeling a persitant "history" would work best. This is a little proposition, might be way above your scope. Let me know!


2

From the looks of it, I find the size selector put in the wrong column. From numerous other e-commerce sites, you do the selections in the first columns for colors, dates, sizes and everything else. Then, when you’re done you move over to the “Add to CART”-button (Add to Bag in your case). That makes it a conscious and more prominent action than “just” ...



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