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7

Most e-Commerce sites have different shipping options. For example it may be "Free Delivery" for standard delivery, $5 for "Next Day Delivery" or $10 for "Saturday Delivery". If this was a T-Shirt company for example, and the cost of the "t-shirt" was $50, and the cost for the shipping (by an external company such as DHL) was $10 then it would be better to ...


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Dan Ariely has some great research in his book Predictably Irrational about the "Power of Free". The most interesting example of the power of “free” in Predictably Irrational comes from Amazon.com. When they launched a “free shipping” promotion with the purchase of a second book every country except France showed a big jump in sales from the offer. ...


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Think of the user experience and perception: If you have a luxury product or service and want to give a feeling of white glove service then free shipping can be important part of that user experience. If you have impulse buy then the user may be more put off by add-on's than the sticker price If you say you are fighting for the lowest price - then show ...


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Option 1 is more explicit at informing user the limit is editable and option 2 is not as explicit as option 1 but it's still clear enough for user to understand the limit field is editable. Option 2's UI is cleaner and looks better but the difference is minor. Both would work but if I have to pick one, I would pick option 2 for your particular scenario. ...


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If you ever have different shipping prices the 'included' versions is much less clear. Several types of delivery, different amounts for different target locations, extra options. You'd either include the most expensive form which makes your prices inflated, of the least expensive form, which makes you some sort of sneaky deflater. They are separate products, ...


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For me personally, it will put me off if the shipping is not including in the visible price. For two reasons, one, I don't want to the math to add the two together to see my final price, and two, I usually am more enticed to purchase something when it says free anything at the bottom. People like free stuff. If you stop to think for a moment, you'd realize ...


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Its all about customer experience and fulfilling the delivery promise. For me Delivery is as important as the product. I will abandon a shopping cart if the delivery options are not satisfactory enough and purchase elsewhere. Our customers tell us they have gained double digit growth by removing the static delivery page within their website. Instead they ...


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One thing you might consider is taxes. In some areas shipping charges are not taxable if listed separately. Which means that your $60 item with free shipping might actually end up costing you more than if it was $50 with $10/shipping. Beyond that serious AB testing needs to occur. My limited experience says that there is almost no real difference between ...


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From a SEO point of view I would use a separate product page for each color, and distinctly put it in the product descriptions. That way when people are searching for a red mixer, they will find your site. You also have more landing pages you can customize from a SEO standpoint. From a UX point of view it would definitely depend on the way you present it. ...


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At tradus.com We use the below We show the entire cart in first scroll. In second scroll we show the address / payment options. The header button changes according to the information filled. i.e If the address / payment information is filled , the button says "Payment>" which take user to payment. Else we show "Checkout" which actually scroll down to ...



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