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6

Good question without a definitive answer. In short, both long page and divided page has their advantages and disadvantages. You will not make a big mistake by using either one of them. Recently I had one publication on that specific topic which was accepted at the CHI conference which is the top HCI conference. Here is a link to download the article. ...


2

The way that most desktop sites appear on mobile means that making the text size larger isn't going to be quite as helpful as you might like and may break the layout - potentially making the experience even worse. From an ecommerce point of view, my suggestion would be to have another look at your Google Analytics and see where in the funnel most of your ...


2

On a long form like this where there are multiple groups of questions there is a good chance something might go wrong for the user. I would focus on asking one thing per page, eg "Your contact details" followed by "How would you like to receive your parcel". Having only one thing on a page gives you more space to explain why you are asking for certain ...


2

Lots of good advice here. It probably boils down to the following: Are there lots of fields where the potential for making errors is high? If you have a long page you cannot rely on inline error validation, because your users may not visit any of the fields and may simply jump to the primary call to action. If they do this the system will need to report ...


2

I think the best solution is to split that long form into steps. From users perspective is easier and less scarier for them to handle a form like this. Also it’s easier for user to get lost in a long form and it’s very difficult to present error, especially when there are multiple errors. In e-commerce this “step-by-step” behaviour is well known and the ...


2

If registration 2 page is just optional information i think you should split that information into multiple pages. This is what we called progressive disclosure. This helps the user to digest the information better and it doesn't feel claustrophobic with a screen full of options. You can use a wizard style design with a few important points. Let the user ...


2

Don't use pages. Instead, load more is more effective on small touchscreens, because it's easier to tap accurately and avoids page reloads. As for how many you should load, that same study proposes 15 to 30 items. Any more, and users start needing to scroll too far. Fewer, and users get annoyed that they have to keep tapping all the time. The study's images ...


2

Users in shopping mode tend to be rather passive, so I wouldn't require more than 1 click. A simple, small textlink saying something like "This listing is missing information" in a corner of the product view would probably not alienate your third parties, but it would get you the data you need to point you to the content you may want to review. Clicking ...


1

Option 2 since in that instance the value is clearly mapped to the handle. And I don't think you need to worry about the value being covered by the finger or thumb. In the scenario of setting the range the interaction is totally focused to this task, which means that you can let the value take up quite a generous bit of space, meaning it can be displayed ...


1

If you want to go with the sliders shown in your question, I will suggest you go with Option 2 Additionally, I guess this will work perfectly on mobiles as the track sliders would be a little difficult for precision with fingers. This page has some more options and the code too http://www.jqueryrain.com/?ot4e1H_o


1

If you still want to display the placeholder colour when it is not selectable, you could display the colours in a different format, here are two quickly mocked-up variations. By displaying the name of the colour and a sample, you can easily display to users all of the information you outlined above. This design also may benefit people with seeing ...



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