Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

3

For a retail site, I would consider "Add To Cart" to be a piece of core functionality. Implementation of core functionality should not magically appear and disappear. While it seems relatively clear in your description, I think this can be confusing to users. If they have not hovered over an item yet, there will not have been an "Add to Cart" button/link ...


3

Communicate why there is a limit Item limits can vary greatly depending on the situation so there isn't a single value that can be applied across the board. It is frustrating anytime an interface prevents logically valid input without explaining why. In an e-commerce situation the best way to communicate reality to a user is to simply tell them your ...


3

I definitely like the first option the best. The second one, although it looks nice, it kind of gives the appearance that there will be a different form for each delivery option. Also, if you don't like the radio button, you could use a different visual indicator, such as a green check mark.


2

From the looks of it, I find the size selector put in the wrong column. From numerous other e-commerce sites, you do the selections in the first columns for colors, dates, sizes and everything else. Then, when you’re done you move over to the “Add to CART”-button (Add to Bag in your case). That makes it a conscious and more prominent action than “just” ...


1

The radio buttons are better associated with uniqueness of the selection than the tabs. However, I would use none of your options but move the delivery option to the last page just before the user places his order. Currently, you mix the user details with the order details which is confusing. Also, you have only three options now, take in account that ...


1

I don't think that there should three options to choose from in either UI option. Implicitly there are two options for a user in that they can either have their package delivered or they can pick it up in store. I'm also assuming that the information a user would need to enter would be different for an in-store pickup in comparison to a delivery. My ...


1

Tabs idea is bad. We went from "I could have a drop down but it feels outdated" to having three big tabs. Users will wonder what is hiding behind each tab. But I guess it will be the same content on all three tabs? It isn't really clear if the text I enter in one tab will be present on the next.. This is how users think of tabs: I think your first solution ...


1

There's one thing I've learned from Reddit, Yik Yak, Stack Exchange, and any other platform with visible metadata: scores increase engagement. You receive no significant incentive from participating, other than a number—yet psychologically we want to beat others. As long as it fits your platform, this might be a great way to increase involvement.


1

I'm not a big fan of multiple choices once the user selected the desired one, so once the user "made his mind", I try to reduce friction as much as possible by "killing" any other non-needed choice. In this particular case, what I would do is to use a multi step process: first, user selects the desired payment option. Then, user is directed to a page ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible