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215

No, it's not a good idea. You want to make purchasing from your website as easy as possible. Forcing a user to give out an email address before they're even able to see what you're selling is not a good approach. This will most probably push a big part of your customers away from the site rather than forming a commitment to it. You should read the $300 ...


138

If you feel the 'Confirm Email Address' field is required, but want to prevent people copy-and-pasting it then why not take a different approach? When requesting the user details and email address just ask the questions once. Then, on the final sign-up / payment screen (depending on your application) add a field on this last page stating: "We will send ...


82

Usability aside, there are also some technical points against your strategy: Basically, you are sending spam to your users. The content of your site is hidden behind a login page - that makes it unsearchable. In many sites, the absolute majority of traffic comes from search results and price comparison sites (like Google Shopping). Similarly, the content ...


80

I would avoid this behaviour as it's breaking people's basic expectations of being able to copy/paste. October 2011 - an article by blogger, speaker and serial entrepreneur Boris Veldhuijzen van Zanten on The Next Web (which he founded) - 10 ways to screw up a web form and piss me off Number 1 - that's number ONE: Don’t ask people to re-type email ...


59

Etsy spent quite some time developing and testing infinite scroll in their search listings. They noticed fewer clicks on results and fewer items favourited from the infinite results page, and users stopped using the search interface to find products. They reverted back to traditional pagination. There's a good article about it here: ...


42

It's a balancing act... you want the option to add promo codes available to those who need it, but to not have it on the radar for those who don't. Here are some hard statistics on the effect of coupon codes on cart abandonment: In one usability test, removing the coupon code field increased overall conversion from 3.8% to 5.1% (an increase of 34%). In ...


41

...would the shop designer want shoppers to enter and walk as quickly as possible between shelves, or rather design the route so that shoppers are encouraged to stop, look, turn, discover... etc? Your analogy is flawed. Even if I walk slowly through a grocery store, my eyes are taking in thousands of pieces of information at a time. I have a ...


37

(See the comments for a lively debate about this idea!) I disagree with the other answers here. (There are 5 at the moment.) Like all good design answers: it depends. In 99% of cases, you'll want to put off on gathering information for as long as possible. But there are a few very good reasons you would want to collect information first. It all depends on ...


35

No. Forcing the user to enter an email address before they can view your products will more than likely drive them away, for the following reasons: Increased barrier to entry to your site - resulting in a dramatic reduction of "eyes on the prize". It's suspicious. The user will wonder why you're asking for their email address to just see your website. ...


31

The question that was not asked directly: Should we hide the main navigation in the checkout process? Yes, we should hide it. A merchant wants to hide the main navigation mainly because of the conversion rate (ratio between people entering the checkout process and the ones actually finishing it). For average users the checkout process can still be ...


26

This kind of UI elements exists and is used in many applications even if differently. Facebook events Google calendar If well designed they are even more affordant than the usual radio buttons. The thing is, because of this affordance they seem "auto selected" so there is no need of a validation like in your example. Therefore I would say radio ...


23

Since the email field is unmasked, the confirmation seems redundant to users. If the user is advanced enough to copy and paste instead of retyping, the user probably knows his/her address. Preventing copy and paste would just annoy users. When the user copies the email, the user has to look at what he wrote and thus would probably notice a mistake, ...


21

This is a tricky interaction, mostly because it has to be super intuitive since the end users are not computer savy. I know it because I´ve had to deal with it in the past :) I had the same problem while working in the UX team at 11870.com (a recomendations website similar to Yelp), this is the way we handled it, might not be the ideal solution but it ...


21

An example of this claim can be found in Smashing UX Design: Foundations for Designing Online User Experiences - page 300, point 2. It says that an odd number of products: can be easier to scan, makes the choice easier to make, keeps the eye moving across a row because the items cannot be grouped easily. It suggests that this might be backed up by the ...


20

I would like to address this issue from two different perspectives: User experience and ethics. User Experience - From a UX point of view, slow load times = bad user experience. Users get irritated if they have to wait more than they think necessary. More than 10 secs, and the user will most probably lose all patience and leave. Jakob Nielsen studied this ...


20

A single button should perform an action, and not act as a radio button. If you want buttons to act as radio buttons, you should use a segmented button. There is established precedent for this in both mobile and web UI, so people are likely to already understand what they do. Additionally the design of segmented buttons shows that the buttons are ...


19

Booking.com experimented with it, conversion dropped immensely. Everything they do there is A/B-tested. I wish I could share statistics, but those are documented internally so you'll just have to take this anecdotal evidence for what it is: something a guy on the internet posted. That said, the reason no large e-commerce websites use it means that it ...


17

I think it can better to make a visual support for such input, that will allow to enter not only breaks, but also days off. Input can look like this: Clicking on row or cell header (with hour or day) should turn on/off all days or hours. Also you can add popular variants at top of table to select them faster — «24x7», «All days without weekends» etc. ...


16

The term Add to Cart indicates that you might be adding the item into the basket of items you are intending to buy but you want to continue shopping, so it's very common to hit an Add to Cart button and for nothing much to happen other than a simple in-page confirmation and a 'number of items in basket' indicator to increment in the corner of the page. The ...


16

It's explained in Amazon's website, in this page Why don't we show the price?: Retailers like Amazon have the legal right to set their own prices independently, but some manufacturers place restrictions on how those prices may be communicated. Because our price on this item is lower than the manufacturer's "minimum advertised price," the ...


15

Nice question. I can think of a few reasons. The contract with the vendor may forbid it. Vendors have all kinds of weird ideas. Some don't let ecommerce websites disclose even the current price unless the user clicked on the product and asked for it specifically. In general, the less info the buyer has, the less he feels in control and the more vulnerable ...


15

I think that treating the current price as 0% would be much more intuitive to a larger section of your users. If you treat your base price as 100% and display relative prices as 120% or 80%, a user might have to visualize the result as 120-100=20% increase or 80-100=20% decrease. The point is that this cognitive strain can be avoided by doing the ...


15

I can see no real functional reason to clear a basket automatically. Basket should have a function to clear old(er) items. A "select all" on the list of items in the basket and "remove from basket" action would suffice for that. Other than that there should be warnings on price changes as Amazon does. And of course there should be a warning when an item in ...


13

I would expect payment information to be demanded only once I've been presented with the absolute grand total, so that I know exactly how much I'm going to be charged. One of the common steps in a checkout process is choosing from delivery options, which often have different charges associated with them. Another example is gift wrapping, which usually ...


13

The zoom feature mainly came into the picture to allow users to examine a product in detail and overcome the challenges involved in actually being able to handle the merchandise before buying it.This is especially common in sites which sell products like clothes or products where users might want to get a closer look at the product before making a purchase. ...


12

Smashing Magazine published an article about a year ago called Fundamental Guidelines Of E-Commerce Checkout Design. One of the points there (No. 10) was that registration should be optional because: "customers already have a myriad of user names and passwords to remember and don’t want to create an entirely new account just to buy one or two products from ...


12

Instead of saying one colour is better than another for your "add to cart" button, I suggest you carry out a multivariate test with different colour and text combinations. You'll soon discover which colour results in the most conversions. (This all assumes your website has enough traffic to conduct the tests in a sensible length of time).


12

Don't do this. Don't even do it for password fields. I use a password database (Password Safe) and I hate sites that won't let me paste a password after I've copied it to the clipboard. I'm trying to be a responsible netizen and not use the same password for multiple sites and not use short, easily cracked passwords either, so don't prevent me from doing so ...


12

I like the textbox idea but I also see the point that people need to press enter and some might not get it. Maybe you can build a prototype and test it? The point about an SEO disadvantage due to less internal linking is also a valid one. However, I would add the number of total pages to your solution as users should know which page they can go to: ...


12

This is tricky, because you have a variety of different scenarios for when automatically clearing items is a great idea and probably just as many for when it’s not. Personally I agree that it shouldn’t be cleared. I’ve been surprised when visiting the same site again to find items in my cart that I didn’t remove by myself. But that’s just me — and the ...



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