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I wasn't able to find anything specifically addressing this in the UI guidelines from Apple or Microsoft, but Chrome uses a similar method of conveying information in the Omnibox. It uses the globe to indicate a website and a magnifying glass to indicate a search. Chrome also uses color to distinguish the different types of selection, which may be ...


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Whatever you do, be mindful of keyboard users as well. I'm not 100% sure of the situation cross-browser, but if you go with the onChange event, you need to make sure it isn't firing each time the up/down arrows are pressed, otherwise when a keyboard user tries to navigate through the list, it'll fire each time they land on an option.


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My suggestion would be to retain the button to add the module as users might accidently click on a selection and find it has been added to a page. This is in violation to Nielsen's heuristics since you are accidently allowing a person to make an error. To quote the heuristic Even better than good error messages is a careful design which prevents a ...


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In the JS Fiddle example you could try eliminating one level by replacing the top level with recurring icons on the right. For locations you could maybe use the abbreviation of a country or state (I don't know what your top level is). Since users can't select the top level (at least, I assume thet can't), you could make it more grey. However, it seems to me ...


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Using indentation and fonts to separate hierarchy levels has its problems: Why should an italic text signify top level, and boldface signal subordination? If the intermediate levels are not selectable, you may also use space to separate levels: The first level is shown as Transportation --------- Car Aircraft --------- Clicking "Car", the next level is ...


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I think this is a reasonable design if the number of items is not huge. The structure is clear, and it allows quick selection of an item. I have tweaked it a little bit to separate the top two levels more. If there is a large number of items, you should use a collapsing tree structure, so the user can narrow down the item they want without having to see ...


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I think a clear distinction between levels can come with such a structure. You can provide states, then locations and Alphabetize it. Also, you can use guides from @Izhaki What's good UX for selecting an item from a list of potentially 20k+ items?


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What about a + next to the country name to open it? This is a fairly standard paradigm. Another option would be to make clicking on the country both show the country results and open the regions for that country. This may be the clearest option on a desktop site, where the navigation is generally displayed next to the content. It wouldn't translate to ...


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The second is uncommon, and a better alternative would be radio controls, as these are probably more familiar to users. The first works best where space is limited, or you just want to hide the un-chosen options to remove visual noise for the user when they are reviewing their choice. e.g. My favourite care is a [Volvo] because it is [spacious]. This ...


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Sometimes, UX decisions are very simple. Not always there has to be some big philosophy behind it. And simple designs are the best designs :) Your case is one of them. Keep the select closed if it is taking too much space or if there are multiple select options. Also you can see, what looks better(which goes with your overall design) on your page. The open ...



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