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I did a bit of informal user testing on this a while ago, to see if there were issues. United Kingdom at the top, then repeated alphabetically. From memory: Many users missed the top listing initially. All users found the correct country eventually Some found the country by returning to the top Some found the country by scrolling to the bottom While ...


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What's wrong with including all the common names? For instance, if you wanted to support the UK and the Netherlands: England Great Britain Holland Netherlands Northern Ireland Scotland United Kingdom Wales If you're worried that users will get confused why there is more than one option, than you could do this: England (or the United Kingdom) Great ...


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You have two options: 1. Avoid lengthy text Is it really necessary to have long text, do people need it to make the choice/selection? Long text can also be overwhelming and difficult to scan. In my experience there is a good chance that an alternative way of presenting options will come up after a brainstorm session. Give it a try! 2. Accept that it's ...


1

I wouldn't use rollover tooltips or additional buttons in the dropdown as user will be confused about the action. I would propose : A) Adjust the width of the dropdown to the max length of the items or even breakdown the item after some width and show each item as a bloc : B )If the content is very distinctive, cut the end of the text and use three dot (....


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If you only have a few options but they're all very long, then maybe a select box isn't the way to go. It could become very annoying for the user to have to click to expand, or hover over, the text for several options just to be sure they are choosing the right one. You could use a custom styled radio button group instead and implement a button to expand a ...


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Having run an almost excessive amount of user testing into the subject of forms (our app is very form-heavy), the conclusion was always that users cared far more about how much they could see on the screen as opposed to how long the form is. In any of the few variants, users that saw more on the screen were easily put off because they could see the amount of ...


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Yes you can split the form and ask user to fill it which improves experience. 1) You may categorize the fields by which are mandatory and optional one. 2) we can use progress bar or navigation (step1 -> 2 ->3) for marking progress. The important thing here is usrr should able to go to prev screens form fields. 3) you may ask user to fill optional fields ...


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Users do not fill such long forms on mobile when they have to type stuff. My suggestions is to have minimum fields or have fields where users do not have to type much and select from given options.


3

I've had to handle a similar situation like this recently. You can try having each question on a single page and track the users progress with a fluid progress bar (dots will just highlight the length). For the dropdown, you can have a scrollable dropdown view, so the user can scroll that instead of the page without loosing focus.


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On hover will not work on mobile devices so scrap that. You could try the ellipsis to show that content has been omitted but not deleted. Item One ... You could try a + symbol to indicate there is more Item One + Click on either symbol to trigger extra menu items verticaly.


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Its not obvious whether a hover action is what one needs to view the full contents of that particular line of text. You could use the trusty [+] sign at the end of the visible part of that line of text.



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