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This is a ripe opportunity for a type-ahead control. In cases where you have a large number of possible choices like this, it is more likely that the user already knows the answer. It would improve the usability tremendously if you let them input the answer and move on, instead of searching a very long list, which wastes their time. For web, I would suggest ...


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So as stated in the edit, I was thinking of limiting list groups to a number of max number of items - let's say 10. To reveal all items the user would have to click a "Show all..." button: This seemed like a decent approach but then the problem is dealing with selected items that are hidden by default. E.g. if item#15 is selected, but the list displays ...


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I feel from a user's standpoint that I very much appreciate a list that auto completes as I type. I don't mean just the first letter, but each letter drills you down farther. In my experience it is the quickest way to get to am item bar none. It is also very rare and I wish more programmers would do it or use tools that do it for them if they aren't into ...


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Option 2 is a better idea. "Have a 'Recently used' section at the top with the x most-recently-used items (3? 5? 10?) and an 'All' section below with everything on the list." In terms of your 'recency or frequency' question, it all depends on what you are holding in the list. For example, if you have data which the user is unlikely to select ...


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Your hierarchy is Groups -> Items. I'm assuming the user must select or create a group before dealing with items. So you probably want to start with the list of groups in a panel on the left side. Creating/editing a group can either be done within that panel or within a popup/lightbox. To the right of the groups, you can list the items in the given group. ...


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you could leave out the description, but put a help-icon next to each role. The help-icon, perhaps a (?) or an (i), show a more detailed description in a tooltip. With this way, you have a nice, clean look and users can easily get information about the roles.


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Your approach seems fine to me. I'd just be a little more detailed and make sure what each level can and cannot do is amply clear. Something like this: These could be visual indicators of each level, too (probably an icon?). Sorry about the typos in that mockup! :)


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I am unsure what is the use case or scenario after you click on the drop down option. But as mentioned by Benortiz, it depends upon what you are solving here. If it is necessary then you can have a pop-up screen to finish the task. Some points you need to keep in mind 1. How frequently does this option used by the user - if it is very frequent then you ...


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What you want to bring up with your boss is Consistency. This is a fundamental UX principle that this pop-up would violate. Check out the consistency section of this UX Booth article: ... each user will choose to interact with your website differently; however, the way in which your website responds should be identical. ... For example, if a few of your ...



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