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43

I use select when the user doesn't need to know all of the alternative choices available. Autosuggest is useful for a long list. Generally, they know what they want and selects save space. Example: Choose a "State" like California or New York. You would never use radio buttons. I use radio buttons when the alternatives matter. When I want to user to ...


21

In this situation, I would not use a drop down until you need to. Using a drop down with one option will be annoying to some degree because people will click on it and expect more choices but not find any. Also, people will be trained to not click on that drop down because its 'useless'. You'll have to somehow retrain them to look for the new options ...


20

Fulfilling user expectations is a fine goal, but it’ll only get you so far. Unexpected results are not themselves bad. Sometimes they are even delightful (“Surprise!”). However, unexpected things in a UI are a sign of a usability problem. To resolve conflicts between kinds of consistency, you need to analyze the situation for the impacts of violating ...


13

Isn't this also a question about granularity? Choose the highest common factor that adds or differentiates value in your service. For example - does a service actually differentiate between users from Scotland and users from England. If yes, include both. If no, stick to the United Kingdom as in Katie's linked list. If there is no differentiation between ...


12

There is no recommended maximum number of items to put in a drop down list. No-one can say the maximum is 7 or 12 or 200 or 10,000 and definitively say that for all scenarios, that is the maximum you should use. There is a myth for drop down lists and menus that you should not use more than 7 +/- 2 because that's how your memory chunks things, but that's ...


12

The only time you should use a dropdown where there is only one available option is: to stay consistent with pages that have many options for the same selection. For example: You are shopping for a new pair of shoes and are currently looking at a style that has sizes 5-14 available. These sizes are displayed in a dropdown. You click on a different style ...


9

Other than space and the number of options, there really isn't a big difference. One thing I do like about radio buttons is that you can style them to look like large buttons, which can be useful for touch interfaces. If you only have a few options, it would be much easier to push a big button than to push the little dropdown and push the little option. ...


9

Choose a standard and stick by it. Here is a link to the International Standards Organisation country names and codes. http://www.iso.org/iso/country_codes/iso_3166_code_lists/country_names_and_code_elements.htm


9

I can think of three approaches for this : download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups With regards to letting the user know at which point the device is unsupported,I would suggest doing it at the earliest so that the customer agent doesn't spend a great deal of time trying to help and then in the end give the response that ...


9

In my personal view dropdowns are outdated and quite frankly rather annoying to interact with. They are fiddly when opening/closing, most often they don't provide much help when scanning items, when combined it is cumbersome to go back a level (e.g. you need to open the Main Heading dropdown again) and when holding many items, a lot of scrolling back and ...


9

The overlay is faster when picking neighboring values. Selecting the next (or previous) value is useful when... Making a font size a little bigger (or smaller). "Trying out" each font in the list (one at a time) to find the "correct" one. Changing the quantity when ordering a product. Picking the correct option, after overshooting (with the mouse) and ...


8

Radio buttons. This is the exact situation that they are designed for.


8

I would recommend going for Radio buttons since you just have two items to show and using radio buttons you can show the information up front Instead of having the user click on the dropdown list and then select a language. To quote what this article on dropdown lists says on when to use to dropdown lists If there’s anywhere between 7 and 15 options, a ...


8

As long as it is clear from your formatting of the links that they are links, you shouldn't have a problem with this. It is basically a drop down menu, and they are used all over the place without too much of an issue. Additionally you are using verbs in the menu items, so it is clear that selecting one of them will perform an action.


8

Radio buttons actually have a very different physical analogy than the paper one you mention: That's also why they are called radio button. I don't know who invented the combo box or how he came up with the idea. I don't think that anyone here will be able to state with confidence how the inventor came up with the idea. I do think your statement that ...


7

A quick search found a Wikipedia page with religions ranked by number of adherents. That seems as good a list as any. Just define your cutoff number for minimum popularity and you have your list.


7

The language for this default option would be entirely dependent upon the context. In general, however, the copy you do use should be unambiguous. It should clearly inform the user what the result of their non-selection will be upon the state of the system. For example, eBay allows a seller to choose whether they would like to offer shipping insurance to ...


7

You could just have one input field that handles city, state, or post code as is pretty common with these things.


7

Menus are a navigation element and so what make the most sense is whatever makes navigation easier for your users. Your first example is a good menu, as although you have only one item under 'Otters', it wouldn't make sense renaming 'Otters' to 'Sarah' as it would then look like 'Sarah' were a type of animal. Additionally, if you get a second otter to keep ...


6

The autocomplete suggestion solution is much better. People don't mind filling of text fields They also struggle with drop downs. EDIT: For example the autocomplete function on http://www.salary.com as the person types in a city a drop down opens that matches all the possible matches. Then the user picks the one they need. The reason is that the user ...


6

Common practices when dealing with long drop down lists (often lists of countries) include: Put the most used options at the top of the list. In country lists, that usually means putting the US, UK, etc at the top of the list since most users will want those. Sort alphabetically. This makes scanning through the list really easy. Make sure the keyboard can ...


6

This question is very similar to this one about selecting a subset of items in a long list.


6

From what I understand, You already have the name of the dealership you want to bring up. This particular UI design approach replicates the physical world way of getting to things. If I want to get to that dealership, how would I? Well, I gotta go to that region, get to the zone, get to the district and then find the dealership. In the physical world, there ...


6

For the hunting down the list you can check out the answers from Adding USA at the top of dropdown list of countries. OK practice or not?. For example: automatically copy popular countries to the top of the list detect the user's location and select that or add it to the top allow for plain text typing and auto complete countries that match Also, if you ...


6

If you have nothing else to guide a sorting order, alphabetic makes the most sense. At the very least it creates an affordance for repeated use, where people will likely recall the name of a previously used menu item before learning the position, and if they're asked to select an item from that menu by documentation or another person, they'll be able to find ...


6

For mouse interaction you can use split buttons instead of menu buttons. In the buttons "A", "B", ... above you can choose the pressed or unpressed state. With the drop down buttons below you can choose the attributes. See microsoft ui guidelines Example with split buttons (not styled): Other approach: The selection of the attributes is displayed when ...


6

With this issue I would suggest to always stick with the way that Safari natively renders the drop down menu. This is what Safari users are already use to, and therefore the behaviour they expect. If a user has a screen with high enough resolution to show the whole list in that manner then you are effectively saving them time from having to scroll through a ...


6

Dropdown lists came out of good design, just like radio buttons :). It's not about importing an analogy from the physical world, it's about providing a solution to a design problem. There was a need to let people choose out of a list of options, without having the list take up all your real estate. One solution would be to put the list inside a modal window, ...


5

The Chosen javascript plugin may be exactly what you're after. It's a versatile combo-box solution. Elegant, too. Here's a screenshot example.


5

Sounds like you need a list with all the names, plus an on-the-fly search box on top of it, filtering the list below: When nothing is typed in the search box, it shows all the names below As the user starts typing, the list is filtered, leaving less and less names Once the list is filtered enough, I would allow the user to move all the names in the ...



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