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0

The question is mostly moot because, even where dragging on empty space is an option, nobody sits there choosing a spot to drag from. That would take longer than moving the mouse straight to the one place you know will work. In terms of quickly acquiring a draggable area, I think it has more than zero value. But if it's not consistent it's not useful, and ...


13

The title bar isn't always the only spot to that can be used to drag the window, (these days some windows can be dragged by parts of their background, but it's rare) but it's the oldest and most established and common convention. It originated in the early WIMP UIs, the Smalltalk systems from the 70s and 80s. If you study the way the above windows were ...


1

There's quite probably also a historical reason: defining whether the cursor is in the title bar is computationally a much simpler problem than defining whether it is in NOT(text OR button OR input box OR scrollbar OR ...). I think I remember draggable windows in GEM on a machine bought in 1987 with 512kB of RAM, and certainly in some DOS applications (text ...


13

This is actually not always true. In some cases the default behavior of most apps would be to allow to drag windows by empty space. An example is KDE. See the screenshot: KDE's default Oxygen widget style has window decoration visually merged with window contents. Thus, to make feel match look, the theme also by default allows to drag windows from all ...


9

The Windows OS provides the (optional) title bar and control box, as well as a mechanism for OS users to organize their application windows (re-positioning, minimizing, maximizing, closing). From the perspective of the Windows OS, the title bar is the user's API for these operations. Everything else in the window is "content" that is under the control of ...


2

Dragging is limited to the title bar for consistency and perhaps usability. If you could both drag a window by clicking in the content area, as well as interact with buttons, text, etc. in the content area, there would be a much higher margin for error (and presumed difficulty in programming). Clicks within the window are reserved for interacting with ...


21

I would say that this often leads to an unwanted drag and drop action. What if this window for example has a small scrollbar, you want to scroll to the bottom of the page and you accidentally miss the scrollbar? You would drag the window down and you might need to reverse this action. Why is it uncommon that windows can be moved by clicking anyway in the ...


0

You could use multiple screens, much like how you'd drag an icon on the home screen from one area to the one next to it. Here's a quick mockup.


0

Option 2 is better than option 1, but I wouldn't bother with the green highlighting. If you are rendering the actual size and position (indented for child element / not indented for root element) where the item will be dropped, then you don't really need any highlighting. The "shadow" and space where the item will drop is all the visual info your user will ...


0

Option 2 looks more intuitive because : it does not introduce a new element like the arrow, the meaning of which might not be obvious to your users and does not force you to suddenly move the item title horizontally and therefore create discomfort during the process by. To build upon it and have your users understand that their action is going to affect ...


0

My answer is one you might already have thought of but I want to share what I did when I ran into the same problem. I conlcuded that zebra striping doesn’t really solve anything but is just a way to make things a bit clearer and is also often used to make tables less boring to look at. They can be useful for two things: to be able to oversee a long row ...


1

I agree that zebra stripes probably are more of a liability than help in this situation. But note that zebra stripes are but just one way to ensure a solid horizontal division between rows. It's also important to note that the evidence that they improve things isn't by any means conclusive. As the article mentions, there's some evidence it helps, but context ...


0

Zebra stripes prevent parallax errors when reading grid rows. You just need every other row too look different. What about giving dragged rows a 3rd colour? Once you save the changes you can re-stripe the rows.


0

As long as your layout is not overcrowded, multiplying the hints does help users figure out what features are available. In addition to the drag handles, you might therefore want to add a "Drag rows to reorder" caption near the top of your table.



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