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33

I'd say the best two options are: 1) Display terms and conditions as long plain legalese text as usual, in a left hand column, but then summarise it in much shorter, friendlier, simpler text on the right. 500px.com does this really well: 2) Format the text in a legible manner. Separate it into linked sections with proper headings, good typography and ...


29

There's no 'right' answer here. What is more important is that you are consistent within your own documentation. Regarding touch interfaces, the typical interaction is 'tap'. Regarding desktops, the typical interaction is 'click'. In both cases, it's not the ONLY interaction, however, as both touch devices and desktops can be navigated in other ways ...


26

This conclusions from Michael Hughes might be helpful for you to decide when to include a screenshot and when not to: So where does this leave me? I am going to be more open to including screen shots where they do the following: Help reassure the user that where they are in the UI is the right place to be Help call attention to a specific ...


23

There are a number of other ways you can look at as well The walk-through approach : The walk-through approach walks your users through the app like how Google does it. Its also called the joyriding approach. To quote this article The “joyriding” approach walks the user through the features of an app or highlights the key features. It’s great ...


22

Conventions and the conscious breaking of The vast majority of people don't have their mouse buttons swapped. Even people who use the mouse with their left hand, often keep the buttons as they would normally be (myself is an example for this). Thus, people who swap these buttons can be considered in UX as complementary personas (people with special ...


17

Oh, wow. You might call this an example of the “metaphor anti-pattern,” where they re-create a physical something in digital form and thereby replicate all its weaknesses; plus, since you can’t truly replicate everything you introduce new weaknesses. In this case for example, users can’t fan through multiple pages to skim to what they want. The result is ...


16

While Fat, Cholesterol and Sodium have attained a social stigma and are regarded as "bad", they're not technically bad for you; for the most part you'll die if you don't intake all of those things. If the labels actually attempted to pass judgement on which items are bad and good, people might actually attempt to get near 0% of the "bad" items and in excess ...


14

This is an interesting approach to this issue: “Terms of Service; Didn't Read” - http://tos-dr.info/ e.g. Facebook ToS:


14

As you will be using Android, perhaps refer to their own Design Principles documentation? They use 'touch'; Access the entire collection of apps and widgets by touching the All Apps button at the center of the Favorites Tray. I would also say you 'touch the button' because isn't that exactly what you are doing on a touch screen device? That surely is ...


12

I would definitly recomend Steve Krugs book "Rocket surgery made easy". Just like his first book, "Don't make me think!", it's a pleasure to read and you'll get some new views on things. This might be the closest approach to agile usability engineering. He suggests that you schedule regular usability tests (once a month at first) and involve developers and ...


12

I know there's an accepted answer, and I usually do quite agree with Michael, but still this does bug my mind for two days. As a developer, I hated the Apple HIG It just didn't tell me what to do, how to do things in practice. The Windows Guideline was felt as "empty", but it could be that it did because it seemed, on Windows, actually noone follows them. ...


11

Looking at the examples in Microsoft's guidelines for keyboard user interface design the order is: CTRL - ALT - SHIFT - [key] This is consistent with the OS X Human Interface Guidelines, which explicitly state that the correct order is Control, Option, Shift, Command.


10

It seems like the work environment isn't that interesting for you, and I would suggest finding a start up or a small company to work for. But that doesn't seem to be the question. So here are some ideas to spice it up a little: Design your documents. Add some color, lay it out on a grid to give good example images. Take a look at skype's brand book for ...


9

Flickr advanced search allows to restrict the sarch according to Creative Commons criteria (e.g., usable for commercial purposes). Due to the diversity of people using flickr you can find many different kinds of pictures using the search term 'portrait' for example: http://www.flickr.com/search/?q=portrait&l=commderiv&ct=0&mt=all&adv=1


9

Terms and Conditions, Privacy Policy, and similar documents are there primarily for legal reasons, not UX ones. So the reason that they are usually terrible to read is that they are written in legaleses rather than human speak. A good alternative is to add additional explanations in human speak next to the legalese. StackExchange is a good example to ...


8

It does, in the sense that it's important for the document to be clear, structured and readable. The principles of good technical writing are eventually aimed at providing good UX for the reader (short paragraphs, a funnel structure, coherent navigation within the document etc). The same goes for spreadsheets - if your user/reader can't find his way around ...


8

Example Style Guides For example style guides applicable to applications, you can leaf through with the usual platform style guides (e.g., Windows, Apple, Gnome) for the organization, issues, and topics you may want to have. Many topics in these guides are not relevant to form-oriented UIs, but most of the guidelines for controls, messages, and dialog boxes ...


8

This would probably be called UI Style Guide or UI Guidelines but there is no 'correct' name. Apple calls theirs 'iOS Human Interface Guidelines', Microsoft calls theirs 'Windows User Experience Interaction Guidelines'. Both covers pretty much everything that needs to go into a document like this. More examples are: ...


7

Per Hal's suggestion, I'll move my comment into an answer: User Experience as a concept would apply to most anything a human would interact with.


7

As others said, you should look into generating HTML files that you ship with your product for help. One of our products (used in an environment without internet access) has been doing this for years and many users prefer it to the PDFs we also ship because the navigation is easier, the content lays itself out to fit the browser window, and the chunk size ...


7

Click implies the pressing of a physical switch which then creates a 'click' sound - typically on devices with input devices attached (such as a mouse) Push implies moving something out of its original position, typical of a physical button, again similar to a mouse (or moreso key) input Press implies moving into physical contact with something, the ...


6

People don't read. The best help is no help. Of course to do that, you need to put a ton of time and work into the UX. So, assuming you do need help, I'd suggest the best would be context sensitive help that can link to your web site with the latest up-to-date help information. You'd publish help as HTML, saving you from proprietary CHM production ...


6

I would consider revealing the help gradually: If you set a standard where each field has a tooltip, you can avoid any special icon - the user will immediately know mouse over will result in a tooltip. Each tooltip should have a link in it (or alternatively the whole tooltip is press-able) to expand it for a more in depth explanation. This explanation can ...


6

I don't have references to hand, and Google is failing me, but my (very fallible) recollection is that: bold text inline decreases reading speed / legibility bold text increases "scannability" when searching since folk can easily find the bolded text There are, of course, other options to highlight key points that will help readers find the important ...


6

To be frank, only a selected few are aware that the Enter and Return keys are not the same - whether you refer to it as Enter or Return, users will press either buttons (if they have both buttons). This is due to the fact that very few software products where the Enter and Return keys do different things (Avid's Pro Tools is the only example I can give). My ...


6

"Enter key" is a more popular choice than "Return key". According to Google ngrams. I'd therefore write "Press Enter" unless I could be certain that the users have a specific keyboard with a specific label on the key want them to use.


6

You should use the screenshot in below case When you cant explain the screen in words properly i.e. if there are more similar option on the screen which might confuse the user. When user will get navigate from one screen to another screen which are non consistent i.e. major UI change or you are redirecting user to different application. Also, you ...


5

I find the Twitter signup page to do a pretty good job at this: They even use this for validation / feedback: It does require a few hundred pixels next to your input field, though. It does, however, leave you the freedom to just provide a short help text followed by a "more..." link.


5

First you design the system as if there will be no training. You have to consciously try to imagine that training will not be an option and make the system as usable as possible. This is no trivial thing, as some aspects may need training, no matter how good the UX is. Once you have done that, you then design the training. This way you should be able to ...


4

OK, I must disclose upfront that this guy is a friend of mine, but this month he's launching a website that's supposed to make the whole process of working with personas easier. One of the features is just what you asked about - access to a very large set of portrait photos taken around the world, explicitly for this purpose (with agreement signed by the ...



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