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1

I had a problem like this recently. The answer I came up with was this: Elements/controls must be contrast compliant when disabled as this provides vital clues to the user telling them that their task is incomplete or that certain options are selected/deselected. - In short: Yes, they need to be contrast compliant. EDIT - The following is incorrect however ...


17

No, it would seem not, as W3C states 1.4.3 Contrast (Minimum): The visual presentation of text and images of text has a contrast ratio of at least 4.5:1, except for the following: (Level AA) Large Text: Large-scale text and images of large-scale text have a contrast ratio of at least 3:1; Incidental: Text or images of text that are part of an ...


2

I think 3 is the best option here. 1 & 2 show the form fields and have them disabled, this could indicate to a user that they could become editable - and they may wonder if they need to perform an action to make them editable. Because they will never be editable, no form controls are needed. The data should be printed. Another thing they may help this ...


0

I also prefer 3, and I would make sure to put the notification after the enabled parent page before the disabled child page. That way users know to click on it, but are prevented from trying to click on the disabled one.


1

I prefer 3. The reason is that if you have a couple of greyed out settings, displaying explantory text can become confusing or dazzling to inexperienced users. It is logical that they will try to tap the greyed out setting, in order to try turning it on. The nessecairy information will apear as needed, without overwhelming them. If you are concerned that ...



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