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Grey is a convention, not a rule It helps to understand why grey is used for disabled buttons: Grey is a neutral color so it's good for communicating subtle or de-emphasized elements. Disabled buttons (because they are not clickable) are usually communicated to the user via de-emphasis. The visual message is: "I am a button (look at my shape) but I ...


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Nothing ever always represents anything... man. But seriously, those buttons look disabled. Don't waste your time running a test, just use another color. White buttons with a blue outline would probably look fine.


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I agree with the points made above. The visual association of a disabled button depends on the context of other buttons and styling. In the same way that red and green to do not always mean negative and positive, grey can mean anything you give it providing there is context enough for a user to understand what active looks like.


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My short answer is no. Grey does not always represent disabled condition. I think it depends on the usage, context and the colour scheme of your app. Lets take email sign up popups as a first example. You land on some news website and immediately after the page loads you are presented with a popup with couple of inputs and usually two buttons, Cancel and ...


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You might want to have a look at a related UXSE question. It is okay to use grey for non disabled things, provided there is no conflict on page. Currently your grey color is overloaded by two meanings. On buttons it acts as a disabled state, on icon is not the case. This reduces affordance and users would definitely frown upon it. The top answers in the ...


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I would not use pointer-events:none; on a disabled button. It's better to manually set the cursor and hover effect to the default/disabled state. In some cases it's useful to add a tooltip to a disabled button; pointer-events none would disable this. I've added a use case for pointer-events:none; below if your interested.. Pointer Event Use Example ...


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From a UX perspective, there are things that could be done to help the user experience by not setting pointer-events to none. Showing disabled fields to a person is sometimes cruel. If the rules for why the field is disabled are complex and not obvious from the screen layout, it is like holding a carrot just out of reach of the person trying to use the ...



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