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6

You should not show controls to the user if they can not interact with them. It will cause problems like frustration, doubts and may be even leaving the process altogether. If the user finds a control that he can't interact with, first is going to look for an explanation of why. Once he doesn't find that answer, he may feel that missed a step before, and ...


5

You should show them, but disabled or gray'ed out. If you are worried about confusion, you can make them appear disabled, but display a dialog if they are clicked. In addition, if the user has UI options, make HIDING them an option. Either way, I would still keep them on the internal MRU list, in case they become availible again.


5

Either way is fine. Of course, replacing the text with "Nothing to Paste" is much more clear and understandable than just disabled "Paste" menu entry, which is good for UX. However it seems to be standard to leave the disabled entry unchanged, like on Windows explorer, you won't find a dynamic disabled paste entry. This way is also friendly for UX because ...


5

The basic rule I recommend is use disabling when a command is currently not available but the user can do something pretty obvious to make it available. I think that fits your situation here. Presumably you have some indication whether each survey is submitted or not (users will need this to know which have been de-submitted and need re-submitting. If all ...


5

I don't think the radio buttons are a bad idea per se, but it's an explanation that itself raises new questions: if there are other modes, why can't I switch to them? It would be best to support this (or a simple label) with an explanation of the current mode and what it takes to be able to switch to the other mode. download bmml source – ...


4

Offer the buttons regardless of whether a user has the privilige to use them. When a non-priviliged user clicks one, bring up a pop-up, thanking them for wanting to use it and offer them the way to get the privilige to actually do so. For example all StackExchange sites allow you to click vote buttons. When you are not logged in they bring up a pop-up to ...


4

I don't think that both options should be visible at the same time. Having a control that allows to view one option at a time greatly simplifies interface and reduces cognitive load. You need to make a decision which option should be a default one based on business requirements and past usage analytics. I believe tabs allow to solve this problem quite ...


3

I'm actually a fan of how bootstrap does their disabled input field. http://getbootstrap.com/css/#forms They even have it set where the mouse arrow changes on hover for added clarification. However, using it is another matter. Sometimes, not showing something until it's available may be a better solution. Perhaps you should explain better in detail ...


3

You have set of the rules and need some to be selected. Appropriate controls for this task are checkboxes. Unchecked rows displayed in gray to minimize eye distraction. For quick enabling/disabling rule it should be easily founded (there could be many rules) and operated. So there are two subtask: Finding. To find rule in quick way it should be easily ...


2

The most important clue to provide is a dimmed label for the input field (in addition to, obviously, dimming any default text in the field). This only works for labels placed (properly) outside the field. A dimmed label or prompt in the field could simply mean “this is not really input.” You can also try graying the background of the field, changing it ...


2

Took me quite a while to notice the buttons. Try moving the Create an Account information you have below the puzzle to the right side of the puzzle. Since the right hand column (subscription, etc.) might be interesting to someone who is signed up, rather than a stranger. Make the reasons for account creation clearer and prominent, also, since you are using ...


2

Microsoft OneNote does not have a Save button because it automatically saves the file, which makes sense in one way, but can be a bit confusing because all of the other MS Office applications retain it. Regardless of whether it makes sense or not, consistency is certainly an important factor. If you disable it in some places and hide it in others, the user ...


2

All of this depends on what you are trying to build and what the most common opearations are. How common is to "unsubmit a survey"? Also, why not provide a "submitted tickbox" for each of the surveys instead of a general one? In your current situation, I think that your best bet may be to change the button text to "Submitted", disable the button, and also ...


2

Based on the constraint that you want to keep both sets of fields visible and indicate that they are both usable at any point, you could wrap them in a radio button group if it's not too confusing for your users, since what you're trying to say to the user (if I'm interpreting you correctly) is that they can use a preset, or they can set a specific range. ...


1

It might help to regard the list of items as "Suggested" locations instead of "Recent" locations. Details of how users obtain the paths in the first place are needed for further elaborations. But basically, the main reason for providing suggestions, is to lead the user the right way. If a user has written a full location path recently, it is likely she ...


1

With assumptions and without seeing the example: Graying out a control typically means its read-only, static or not editable. A missing element means, well, that it does not exist. If the icon is tightly coupled with the control (its a clickable element or the like in context) then it should appear as the control does. My other opinion is a screen with ...


1

I think you're on the right track with the strategies you're brought up already, especially the partially transparent one. I don't know how your layout is composed, so my suggestion is for a fictive layout which I hope can be applicable for your app. You're looking for a strategy for providing feedback of system state, to communicate to the user what is ...


1

Make the text for the disables rules all gray. For the whole row. This will help the user see at a glance which rules are in effect and which are disabled. Follow this up with an icon on the right that will let a user enable/disable the rule. You are very limited on size here so putting a toggle with "on" and "off" as text is out. Your best bet would be one ...


1

The current example has a slight contradiction in terms on how the option's input control is shown: for the second option you have the input control at the bottom, while for the third option the input control occupies the entire right panel. This can be confusing as it doesn't seem clear which option affects the interactions with right list control (and I ...


1

I would not use radio buttons unless the user can interact with it. You can use a simple label or hyperlink (explaining what the modes are) instead. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups You can have a overlay or a modal window pop-up when you click on the mode to explain what it is.



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