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6

You should not show controls to the user if they can not interact with them. It will cause problems like frustration, doubts and may be even leaving the process altogether. If the user finds a control that he can't interact with, first is going to look for an explanation of why. Once he doesn't find that answer, he may feel that missed a step before, and ...


6

The basic rule I recommend is use disabling when a command is currently not available but the user can do something pretty obvious to make it available. I think that fits your situation here. Presumably you have some indication whether each survey is submitted or not (users will need this to know which have been de-submitted and need re-submitting. If all ...


5

You should show them, but disabled or gray'ed out. If you are worried about confusion, you can make them appear disabled, but display a dialog if they are clicked. In addition, if the user has UI options, make HIDING them an option. Either way, I would still keep them on the internal MRU list, in case they become availible again.


5

Either way is fine. Of course, replacing the text with "Nothing to Paste" is much more clear and understandable than just disabled "Paste" menu entry, which is good for UX. However it seems to be standard to leave the disabled entry unchanged, like on Windows explorer, you won't find a dynamic disabled paste entry. This way is also friendly for UX because ...


4

I don't think that both options should be visible at the same time. Having a control that allows to view one option at a time greatly simplifies interface and reduces cognitive load. You need to make a decision which option should be a default one based on business requirements and past usage analytics. I believe tabs allow to solve this problem quite ...


4

I'm actually a fan of how bootstrap does their disabled input field. http://getbootstrap.com/css/#forms They even have it set where the mouse arrow changes on hover for added clarification. However, using it is another matter. Sometimes, not showing something until it's available may be a better solution. Perhaps you should explain better in detail ...


2

All of this depends on what you are trying to build and what the most common opearations are. How common is to "unsubmit a survey"? Also, why not provide a "submitted tickbox" for each of the surveys instead of a general one? In your current situation, I think that your best bet may be to change the button text to "Submitted", disable the button, and also ...


2

Microsoft OneNote does not have a Save button because it automatically saves the file, which makes sense in one way, but can be a bit confusing because all of the other MS Office applications retain it. Regardless of whether it makes sense or not, consistency is certainly an important factor. If you disable it in some places and hide it in others, the user ...


2

Based on the constraint that you want to keep both sets of fields visible and indicate that they are both usable at any point, you could wrap them in a radio button group if it's not too confusing for your users, since what you're trying to say to the user (if I'm interpreting you correctly) is that they can use a preset, or they can set a specific range. ...


2

The most important clue to provide is a dimmed label for the input field (in addition to, obviously, dimming any default text in the field). This only works for labels placed (properly) outside the field. A dimmed label or prompt in the field could simply mean “this is not really input.” You can also try graying the background of the field, changing it ...


2

There are several reasons that if your facetted search is very open, more like a network of combined selections, that you should leave empty filters visible. Consistency You are better off disabling the filters so the interface retains consistency throughout the interaction. If there are always the same set of filters then the user can learn the interface ...


1

People who are flicking through navigation like that are expecting to click in the same place all the time. The simple fact is that most users don't look when they are clicking "next" on each page / screen. If you start removing items from your navigation because they don't apply for that particular page, the other navigation links will move relative to ...


1

Disable option tells you that you are not eligible to access this feature because of 1: f permissions 2: or they are dependent on another action & gets invoked after an action. You can keep them disable and give an explanation on hover[not mandatory]


1

It might help to regard the list of items as "Suggested" locations instead of "Recent" locations. Details of how users obtain the paths in the first place are needed for further elaborations. But basically, the main reason for providing suggestions, is to lead the user the right way. If a user has written a full location path recently, it is likely she ...


1

With assumptions and without seeing the example: Graying out a control typically means its read-only, static or not editable. A missing element means, well, that it does not exist. If the icon is tightly coupled with the control (its a clickable element or the like in context) then it should appear as the control does. My other opinion is a screen with ...


1

I think you're on the right track with the strategies you're brought up already, especially the partially transparent one. I don't know how your layout is composed, so my suggestion is for a fictive layout which I hope can be applicable for your app. You're looking for a strategy for providing feedback of system state, to communicate to the user what is ...



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