New answers tagged

-1

The reason why the old password field is shown is to validate you are the account holder. The reason why the new password field is repeated twice is because the password fields are usually masked and the user cannot see what they are typing, so by asking twice you ensure there are no unintended typos (after all we are only human and make typing mistakes all ...


0

There are a couple of things going on here. If a user has chosen or been prompted to change their password it is usually for security reasons. The requirement for a password that differs from the old one depends on the level of security you need to implement: In financial institutions they often require a password of more than 8 characters which must ...


0

I feel you need to refer the UX.stackexchange.com, after submitting the comments, it shows process icon with message. For submission of article, showing the progress/process icon would be better. Showing as background save would not fit here. Background task best fits in File sync, download and etc.


0

I like HKYL's suggestion, but I would add that even if something is happening in the background, you should indicate that it is happening to the user, no matter what the conditions are. For some users, having no indication of any progress can create anxiety and uncertainty about how the system is working and if their work is going to be retained. We can ...


0

You should put it in the background. When it fails, pop up a notification and/or a black bar that says something like "Publishing failed. Retrying...". And also, if the user requests the list, and the app knows it's still uploading, it just should add a little mark, that says "In progress...".


0

One thing not mentioned so far is that any non-white background color makes it very easy to highlight textboxes and some other interactive UI elements (checkboxes, comboboxes, dropboxes, etc), by using white.


176

There is not really a "UX" reason for this—or if there is, it is a very limited one. The actual reason why dialog backgrounds are (by default) some shade of grey is because some designers thought that looked better. In many early operating systems, dialog and window backgrounds were stark white. Obviously they were white on the original Mac OS, since it had ...


16

Because the difference between the font-color and the background-color can cause eye strain and is not optimal. Having black or dark-grey text on a lighter grey background is the easiest for the human eye to read. See this link for a more detailed answer. It tells you when to use brighter fonts with a dark background, and also when not to do this. ...


35

Too much white can cause eye strain, so tints of grey reduce this. There is another ux.se topic which discusses white vs grey backgrounds: Grey versus white background for ease of use and readability/legibility


1

This behaviour does two main jobs: first, it draws attention to your popup / dialog box and second, let's user know that the page behind it (for browsers) it's inactive in this state. And those shadows or overlays are making a pretty good job. Also the colour doesn't matter, you could use white, red, blue etc. as long the UI permits.


0

I agree with @maceigesawacki, adding to that All the date picker controls are Popover dialog and it doesn't need specific close(x) icon cos User can click outside the popover dialog to close the dialog User can click on the 'submit' button to submit the form data and close the dialog It's hard to accommodate the place for the close icon cos there are ...


1

You are describing the flow by specifying which widgets you will use, which is not advisable until you are clear about what it is you want the user to do. It looks like the primary task is you want the customer to confirm they received the thing they ordered. A secondary task is you would like the customer to provide some feedback. The highlighted words ...



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