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17

The idea behind this bar can be traced back to Gestalt's law of similarity which states: Elements within an assortment of objects are perceptually grouped together if they are similar to each other. This is why you shall see two columns in (a) and two rows in (b). The latter also demonstrates that colour wins over shape (in this specific example at ...


10

I'm author of WinSCP and I've found this "question" really inspiring. Thanks. This is my (kind of) "answer". Improvements I've done (see also screenshot below): Inspired by @Vijay's answer (and Directory Opus), I have merged similar buttons into one with drop down menu. So now there are only 4 buttons, Yes (with Newer Only and Yes to All in menu), No ...


8

I would argue no - this triggers alarm bells as to: 'what have I actually done?' and is not common practices with most software products. However Excel is a bit of a weird fish when it comes to this - it could be dependant upon the macros within the sheet, here is an interesting thread discussing the same issue. ...


4

I would recommend going with the cancel option since most users might not be used to the concept of using the close icon (the X) to close a dialog in a mobile app (you have them in websites) but then with a mobile app the common affordance to what I have found is to to have a distinct cancel option as shown below:


4

In many UIs, you can input a number directly in a spin box without using the arrows. Taking this fact into account, I think that you should use a spin box only when it makes sense for the user to change the value using the arrows instead of inputing directly a new value. In my opinion, using the arrows makes sense only when you need to increment/decrement a ...


3

Use spin boxes when the value being entered is a numerical value within a range, and don't use them when the number instead represents an identity (e.g. port number). Especially consider using spin boxes if the value is a numerical value where you want to encourage particular increments (e.g. thousands)


3

For the most part I would go with a dedicated 'Cancel' labelled button rather than an 'x' on mobile. The target area is generally to small for the user to have a fluid interaction. If you make the 'x' a bigger target area it can be used. A good size might be the one used for delete options(red -). It seems to work quite well for apple so far. Not exactly ...


3

As it is going to to be used by non-professionals, I would suggest using swatches in the first place. It's a great starting point, often offering proper balance between choice and usability for such use. As a second level (only for situations, where swatches are not enough for user) you can indeed provide an optional color picker. You have following options ...


2

If no changes have been made to the document, it should close without dialog. This can be seen through a visual indicator that shows whether the current state is saved or not. This does raise the question of which changes the dialog is referring to. An example of where a solution has been implemented is in Linux, it tells you when the last change was ...


1

Why not add declaratives within those replies? Specifically: Abandon changes? No, keep editing Yes, abandon So this explicitly answers the question being asked, and provides confirmation of the next action that is desired. It should be fairly straightforward to apply the declarative, action pattern to any of your confirmation dialogue questions.


1

To answer the general case: Without question - you do not prompt the user to save, if no changes were made. In fact I believe that is the designed and intended behaviour for Excel - despite what you think you see. As to whether the application thinks a change has been made that is a different thing - and a specific thing to the software in question. In ...


1

You're right, that dialog is confusing. I'm not quite sure what the need is here from the user's perspective. You mention it is a "check-in", so I am assuming that either this dialog is displayed every time a user logs in, or it is displayed only when they click a button/link somewhere else on the site. So the natural question is, what does the user need ...


1

Actually the accepted answer does not show one main reason why it has been made this way. More than visual perception, putting a fixed bar at the bottom of a modal popup which has actions (like "OK" button in your examples) will let the user see the possible actions even if the content section is too big to fit in a small screen -->There is a scrollbar. ...


1

As psychologists say, a human rather frequently is leaded by "unconscious brain" and cognitive baises while taking decisions. Almost all Web sites have target behaviors. How do they get us to engage in the target behavior? How do they get us to buy, register, donate, and click? What makes us click? To get us to click, they have to persuade us. ...



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