Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

17

The idea behind this bar can be traced back to Gestalt's law of similarity which states: Elements within an assortment of objects are perceptually grouped together if they are similar to each other. This is why you shall see two columns in (a) and two rows in (b). The latter also demonstrates that colour wins over shape (in this specific example at ...


8

I would argue no - this triggers alarm bells as to: 'what have I actually done?' and is not common practices with most software products. However Excel is a bit of a weird fish when it comes to this - it could be dependant upon the macros within the sheet, here is an interesting thread discussing the same issue. ...


5

I'm going to be the wet blanket and suggest that there may not be a big benefit. The fact that these are being used more often is more about changes in technology. We can do it this way now, so let's do it this way. Yes, drag-and-drop is not a new concept. It's been part of our systems GUIs for 4 decades. But note that the process of uploading a file via ...


4

In many UIs, you can input a number directly in a spin box without using the arrows. Taking this fact into account, I think that you should use a spin box only when it makes sense for the user to change the value using the arrows instead of inputing directly a new value. In my opinion, using the arrows makes sense only when you need to increment/decrement a ...


3

It all depends on the alert that is being provided to the user. If it is an alert with regards to purchasing and item (i.e. In-App Purchases) usually the "No" is highlighted as to prevent accidental purchases. However, when it comes to cases such as connecting social accounts or opening a link in safari, "yes" should be highlighted because of the likely ...


3

Modal windows opening up other modal windows is a recipe for disaster. An approach you should consider has two components; a form editor and form navigation. If the forms are sequential in nature or nested, then a navigational component, similar to mileposts will help the user know where they are in the sequence, and facilitate navigation to previous ...


3

The placement of the OK button really depends on the content of the modal. If you tend to use them for forms, a left justified button may be best. As forms are usually left justified it is easiest for users to go down in a straight line. A user's eyes are likely not to leave the left side of the modal often. However for shorter modals that may not have ...


3

You could try the following flow. Hub page contains appropriate links which allow to set additional parameters.


3

As it is going to to be used by non-professionals, I would suggest using swatches in the first place. It's a great starting point, often offering proper balance between choice and usability for such use. As a second level (only for situations, where swatches are not enough for user) you can indeed provide an optional color picker. You have following options ...


3

Use spin boxes when the value being entered is a numerical value within a range, and don't use them when the number instead represents an identity (e.g. port number). Especially consider using spin boxes if the value is a numerical value where you want to encourage particular increments (e.g. thousands)


2

If no changes have been made to the document, it should close without dialog. This can be seen through a visual indicator that shows whether the current state is saved or not. This does raise the question of which changes the dialog is referring to. An example of where a solution has been implemented is in Linux, it tells you when the last change was ...


2

Drag and drop save much time because folder with working files are often opened and it's faster to drag it directly to website. I do it little bit faster: Alt tab from browser to folder Click and hold document icon Alt tab to your browser RELEASE!


2

Drag drop can be useful in various cases e.g. If folder with file is already open - saves you time of browsing to the correct location from the open file dialog. You can drag multiple files in one go. You can drag items from open apps e.g. drag an image from an image editing application or from an open browser window without even saving the image. In some ...


1

The overall usefulness here all depends on what files you want to upload, how your workflow is and how you organize them. Scenario 1 : You know where your stuff is You know exactly which files you want to upload, how they are named and in what folder they are located. Navigating to them in an explorer window and drag/dropping them will need ...


1

My theory is that it conveniently simulates the already learned drag and drop convention on the desktop. Opening a separate File browser can usually disorient the user because they'll have to relocate the file again. Imagine... You save a file to the desktop. You locate the file on the desktop. You drag the file to the browser. Simple! With a file ...


1

Drag and drop for file actions is common across the wider operating system environment, the file upload button is typically a control specific to browsers, and therefore when dealing with file based operations isolates them from the wider operating and UX environment that they inhabit, thereby potentially creating a break from the global UX. Implementing ...


1

If I am reading the description correctly, a person cannot type a different number into the text field that is in focus? If that is the case, that should be changed as placing that field in focus implies that the user doesn't have to use their mouse. One idea would be to allow the user to type whatever value they want into the field, and then show updated ...


1

No, as there's nothing to save. Prompting to save would raise doubt in the user (why is it asking me to save? Did I make a change? I didn't want to make a change! What did I do!?) and that is not something you want to do. :)


1

To answer the general case: Without question - you do not prompt the user to save, if no changes were made. In fact I believe that is the designed and intended behaviour for Excel - despite what you think you see. As to whether the application thinks a change has been made that is a different thing - and a specific thing to the software in question. In ...


1

Why not add declaratives within those replies? Specifically: Abandon changes? No, keep editing Yes, abandon So this explicitly answers the question being asked, and provides confirmation of the next action that is desired. It should be fairly straightforward to apply the declarative, action pattern to any of your confirmation dialogue questions.


1

Make it as easy as possible for the user. If possible, avoid them having to click 20 times. download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups The archive links should update according to the audio format the user selected. (This is a little bit of Javascript.)


1

You're right, that dialog is confusing. I'm not quite sure what the need is here from the user's perspective. You mention it is a "check-in", so I am assuming that either this dialog is displayed every time a user logs in, or it is displayed only when they click a button/link somewhere else on the site. So the natural question is, what does the user need ...


1

Actually the accepted answer does not show one main reason why it has been made this way. More than visual perception, putting a fixed bar at the bottom of a modal popup which has actions (like "OK" button in your examples) will let the user see the possible actions even if the content section is too big to fit in a small screen -->There is a scrollbar. ...


1

This is a pretty common way for calling out the tasks for the modal you have open, to bring more attention to them. I don't think its necessary to have the bar a different color if your task buttons stand out.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible