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5

I'm going to be the wet blanket and suggest that there may not be a big benefit. The fact that these are being used more often is more about changes in technology. We can do it this way now, so let's do it this way. Yes, drag-and-drop is not a new concept. It's been part of our systems GUIs for 4 decades. But note that the process of uploading a file via ...


4

The overall usefulness here all depends on what files you want to upload, how your workflow is and how you organize them. Scenario 1 : You know where your stuff is You know exactly which files you want to upload, how they are named and in what folder they are located. Navigating to them in an explorer window and drag/dropping them will need ...


3

It all depends on the alert that is being provided to the user. If it is an alert with regards to purchasing and item (i.e. In-App Purchases) usually the "No" is highlighted as to prevent accidental purchases. However, when it comes to cases such as connecting social accounts or opening a link in safari, "yes" should be highlighted because of the likely ...


3

Modal windows opening up other modal windows is a recipe for disaster. An approach you should consider has two components; a form editor and form navigation. If the forms are sequential in nature or nested, then a navigational component, similar to mileposts will help the user know where they are in the sequence, and facilitate navigation to previous ...


3

The only time I can think of when no close button should be there is when "Cancel" action is not acceptable, e.g. the user must make a choice. This is often connected to popups that isn't caused by user action. For example, the system must be restarted and asks the user when the system should reboot. "Now", "In an hour" etc. Letting the user close that ...


3

Drag and drop save much time because folder with working files are often opened and it's faster to drag it directly to website. I do it little bit faster: Alt tab from browser to folder Click and hold document icon Alt tab to your browser RELEASE!


3

The placement of the OK button really depends on the content of the modal. If you tend to use them for forms, a left justified button may be best. As forms are usually left justified it is easiest for users to go down in a straight line. A user's eyes are likely not to leave the left side of the modal often. However for shorter modals that may not have ...


2

Drag drop can be useful in various cases e.g. If folder with file is already open - saves you time of browsing to the correct location from the open file dialog. You can drag multiple files in one go. You can drag items from open apps e.g. drag an image from an image editing application or from an open browser window without even saving the image. In some ...


2

A Dropdown with just two options isn't the right way to go consider displaying both the options with radio buttons. Using tabs in a wizard wouldn't be appropriate. Consider something like this . It will be a better to convert the tab into one additional step.


2

A wizard with tabs? Wizards and tabs should be mutually exclusive. As it says on page 179 of the Windows 7 User Experience Interaction Guidelines, you shouldn’t use tabs if the controls on one tab are dependent on the settings of another. The user should have one decision for each page of a wizard –there never should be so many controls that you need tabs. ...


2

1. Is it OK to resize the dialog to accommodate changed content? Yes it is nowadays, providing it doesn't cause the window to scroll offscreen. There are lots of ways to do validation notices, but the approach you've chosen (notify below the field, red, left-aligned) is a very well tested and classic approach so it's a safe choice. The main downside to ...


1

If you can't change the buttons, I would just widen the textarea to the full width of the box. And I would provide a reason for WHY you want me to give you a reason to delete something, like "We can make our service better with your feedback", or something along those lines.


1

Considering the user cannot navigate to the second tab, keep it disabled. When conditions to enable it are met, enable it and provide a fade-in animation such that the user notices the change. Keep it simple! :)


1

Surfacing new features and 'discoverability' in general are major UX challenges. Don't expect a change log (or any other approach) to completely handle this for you. Users can and will ignore even outrageous modal dialogs. As a general goal, you should strive to make new features naturally apparent to users... sometimes easier said than done. For a ...


1

Removing the [X] button should be avoided at all costs since it is the go to button if you don't know what to do and want to cancel your actions. That said I have had to make a few of them in the past. The reason was that we were building a new UI on a very old piece of software. On 1 or 2 occasions the software needed a response from the user in such a way ...


1

I want to start of by saying that I loath modals. I do know that there are certainly scenarios where they are good and necessary, but I really don't like them on principal. That being said, some of the examples given, I would argue, do not justify the disabling of the close button. A close button is a very known and comfortable escape hatch. Depending on ...


1

Personally, I think Microsoft's guideline makes little sense. A typical dialog requesting a decision from the user give buttons for all of the possible actions to take at that point (ok/cancel, yes/no, save/don't save/cancel). On most dialogs, the close button doesn't give the user additional "control"; it just provides a duplicate way to perform an ...


1

I disagree with Francis; modal dialogs more often have buttons right-aligned and text left-aligned. There isn't a strong, well-established usability reason for this other than consistency with other existing examples. That is, because most dialogs have the button(s) on the right, the user will expect the button(s) to be on the right. As a user, I personally ...


1

Have you tested the functionality with your User? It is not difficult or very time-consuming to locate and garner files using the OS search functions and copy and paste them into an appropriate folder. I would be very upset if I had to pogo stick in and out of your upload dialog 20 times to populate a photo gallery.


1

My theory is that it conveniently simulates the already learned drag and drop convention on the desktop. Opening a separate File browser can usually disorient the user because they'll have to relocate the file again. Imagine... You save a file to the desktop. You locate the file on the desktop. You drag the file to the browser. Simple! With a file ...


1

Drag and drop for file actions is common across the wider operating system environment, the file upload button is typically a control specific to browsers, and therefore when dealing with file based operations isolates them from the wider operating and UX environment that they inhabit, thereby potentially creating a break from the global UX. Implementing ...


1

If I am reading the description correctly, a person cannot type a different number into the text field that is in focus? If that is the case, that should be changed as placing that field in focus implies that the user doesn't have to use their mouse. One idea would be to allow the user to type whatever value they want into the field, and then show updated ...



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