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178

There is not really a "UX" reason for this—or if there is, it is a very limited one. The actual reason why dialog backgrounds are (by default) some shade of grey is because some designers thought that looked better. In many early operating systems, dialog and window backgrounds were stark white. Obviously they were white on the original Mac OS, since it had ...


59

An interesting question, and one that I think many of us might have pondered before without really diving too deep into the possible issues. From a purely design perspective, I can think of a number of plausible reasons: Convention: the first person did it this way, and then everybody else followed because "that's how it's done". Safety first: separating a ...


35

Too much white can cause eye strain, so tints of grey reduce this. There is another ux.se topic which discusses white vs grey backgrounds: Grey versus white background for ease of use and readability/legibility


16

Because the difference between the font-color and the background-color can cause eye strain and is not optimal. Having black or dark-grey text on a lighter grey background is the easiest for the human eye to read. See this link for a more detailed answer. It tells you when to use brighter fonts with a dark background, and also when not to do this. ...


16

Both Find and Find and Replace are related functionally as you mention. But both actions seem to be orthogonal in terms of what user need (mindset) they cater to. You will know in advance either you want to find something or you rather want to substitute occurrences of something. In the latter case it just happens that you need to find occurrences of the ...


9

If you can expect your users to be power text editor users, for example programmers, then it makes sense to combine these dialogs into one, or, even better, make it a toolbar and show real-time results as you type. This is an expected feature for development tools nowadays, as it speeds up the editing process greatly. IDEs (integrated development ...


4

I see this as new behaviour. Without an old install of MSOffice to test I can't be absolutely sure, but in the past find/replace dialog boxes were often modal, and covered quite a lot of text. For find only tools this isn't necessary - they tend to have 2-4 controls of which only one is a text box (wide). Replace requires at least another text box and ...


4

I like to label buttons with the action they perform where possible. In the dialogue you describe, I would try something like this:


4

Discard change. Make it clear that Dialog B edits part of configuration that Dialog A controls. Do this by: show system state make the values that Dialog B edits displayed as a summary change-set in Dialog A use different buttons have "Save" / "Apply" on Dialog A and "OK" / "Done" on Dialog B I wouldn't recommend having that interaction pattern in ...


2

I think what you're looking for would fall under the "No Keyboard Trap" (SC 2.1.2) of WCAG 2.0: "The intent of this Success Criterion is to ensure that that content does not "trap" keyboard focus within subsections of content on a Web page. This is a common problem when multiple formats are combined within a page and rendered using plug-ins or ...


2

In my experience working for my company and developing user interfaces for automated machines, i've seen that the only case where such windows and dialogs are required is when critical functions are activated and the application must be blocked until such operations terminate. In all other cases always on top windows/dialogs result annoying and frustrating ...


2

It's not appropriate to keep the upgrade notice on the very top, regardless of which other applications you might want to use, while the application in question upgrades itself. Window management and the Z order of windows Your question is about the stacking order, or Z order, of windows. I assume you're dealing with a PC or tablet, since small devices ...


2

Find is sensible with a non-modifiable document. Replace is not. Historically, was "replace" greyed-out or not displayed in read-only mode? Maybe back when there was only space for one copy of the document on the 720k floppy disk? These days, it's normal that the document's text is always modifiable and it's the file that is not, So it is "Save" that is ...


2

You could use wordings that describe where the user will land after clicking the buttons, rather than their relations to the immediate action (which creates this paradox you highlighted): Go/Return to Login/Front page Continue Sign-Up


1

I feel you need to refer the UX.stackexchange.com, after submitting the comments, it shows process icon with message. For submission of article, showing the progress/process icon would be better. Showing as background save would not fit here. Background task best fits in File sync, download and etc.


1

This behaviour does two main jobs: first, it draws attention to your popup / dialog box and second, let's user know that the page behind it (for browsers) it's inactive in this state. And those shadows or overlays are making a pretty good job. Also the colour doesn't matter, you could use white, red, blue etc. as long the UI permits.


1

You are describing the flow by specifying which widgets you will use, which is not advisable until you are clear about what it is you want the user to do. It looks like the primary task is you want the customer to confirm they received the thing they ordered. A secondary task is you would like the customer to provide some feedback. The highlighted words ...


1

Common requirements: I have identified common requirements/patterns for the "dialog" concepts I came across. OK and Cancel buttons Close icon in top-right corner (same action as "cancel"?) Hitting "escape" closes the prompt (same action as "cancel"?) User can move popup around using drag n drop Confirmation dialog must be enforced by ticking a checkbox ...


1

Ill go as far as saying: dont confirm the cancellation of the sign up. but on the login screen afterwards, provide a "no worries, continue signup where you left off"


1

Need more context here. Behaviour is different for desktop (windows, mac) app as compared to web. Desktop The dialog opens as a new window. Typically, the new window gets focus. User can tab to return focus to the main window, while keeping the smaller dialog. Or close the window using the close window shortcut (Windows: Ctrl + W , Mac: Cmd + W) Web Web ...


1

It's best to follow the standards You're asking about a dialog on Android. Dismissing a dialog box I recommend you do what the Android style guide says to do: Dialogs can be dismissed by touching/clicking outside of the dialog or by using the system back button (Android). Dialog behavior can be overridden so that users must explicitly choose one of ...


1

Honestly, if you're worrying about Authenticity, almost anyone can emulate the signature you have specified in the dialog box unless there is a unique code you have. A dialog box is a secondary window that prompts an exchange of information between the user and the program. As per the Design Guidelines for Dialog Boxes: Do not use customized dialog ...


1

A proposition from me is to use the #3 option starting the message with apology, then briefly explain why the action is unavailable and finally provide instructions on how to fix the error if possible. Sorry, the action is unavailable due to this. Go here and change this. Ideally the error message will be concise with red colored and should point to ...


1

You should keep the button labels as short as possible and they should be simple commands. So yes/no is better than long descriptions for each button. However, rather than yes/no, more descriptive commands like discard/keep are preferred. The description should, instead, be placed in the text area of the dialog. Take this example from Microsoft's Dev Center:...



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